•   
  •   
  •   

Food & Drink Why Thousands of Oyster Shells Are Being Dumped Into New York Harbor

18:28  09 august  2018
18:28  09 august  2018 Source:   food52.com

This Is the Easiest Way to Tell if Your Eggs Have Gone Bad

  This Is the Easiest Way to Tell if Your Eggs Have Gone Bad This Is the Easiest Way to Tell if Your Eggs Have Gone Bad Unless you have a direct and reliable source for eggs, it is often hard to tell when your eggs were actually laid. Store-bought eggs do have “best by” dates listed on their cartons, and although that date can give a clue as to the freshness, it ultimately cannot determine if an egg is still good to eat. With this easy trick, however, you can tell in just seconds whether your egg has gone bad.First, place your eggs in a bowl and fill it with water to cover.If your egg lies on its side on the bottom of the bowl:Your egg is still fresh.

The New York City–based initiative traverses the five boroughs, collecting discarded oyster shells from over 70 restaurants. The mission of the organization is The inspiration for their project is rooted in history. The Billion Oyster Project calls upon New York Harbor ’s rich legacy as one of the most

The New York City–based initiative traverses the five boroughs, collecting discarded oyster shells from over 70 restaurants. The restaurant collection program is but one arm of the organization's oyster appreciation. Ultimately, they want to create an environment in New York Harbor that allows

In the summer, Manhattan’s seemingly ubiquitous sidewalk chalkboards change their tune. They sport a new adage: “$1 oysters on the half shell.” Like sirens, they beckon, urging passersby inside with fresh briny bounty and, in a city where they’re increasingly harder to come by, the promise of a deal.

Patio sitters slurp happy hour bivalves to the tune of rush hour traffic, and as the sun sets on yet another languid summer day, the city’s kitchens are greeted by a very new, very seasonal, very specific kind of trash: heaps and heaps of craggy, gray oyster shells, hulking mounds of clacking detritus that tear seams in plastic trash bags.

A Florida man died of flesh-eating bacteria after eating raw oysters — here's how concerned you should be

  A Florida man died of flesh-eating bacteria after eating raw oysters — here's how concerned you should be A Florida man died of flesh-eating bacteria after eating raw oysters — here's how concerned you should be.A 71-year-old man in Florida died on July 10 after being infected by bacteria that cause flesh-eating disease (necrotizing fasciitis) from eating a contaminated raw oyster, according to local news reports.

Without oysters , New York Harbor ’s ecosystem lacks a crucial element. Each adult oyster can filter dozens of gallons of water each day, and an oyster With thousands more oysters in this installation project, there is a higher likelihood that oyster larvae will latch on to shells and grow into adults.

New York used to be lousy with oysters . Like all good things in New York , the locals ruined the oyster beds By 1910, oyster bed populations were declining rapidly due to increased overfishing and water pollution (600 million gallons of untreated sewage were being dumped into New York City

a plate of food on a table: How to Tell The Difference Between the 5 Types of US Oysters© Provided by Food52 How to Tell The Difference Between the 5 Types of US Oysters

How to Tell The Difference Between the 5 Types of US Oysters by Cynthia Nims

One organization, the Billion Oyster Project, sees these shells not as refuse, but as a chance for renewal.

The New York City–based initiative traverses the five boroughs, collecting discarded oyster shells from over 70 restaurants. The mission of the organization is to restabilize New York’s waterways by dumping massive amounts of oyster shells into the murky waters surrounding the city. It seems strange, yes, but the team at the Billion Oyster Project is onto something.

The shells, which would otherwise toil away in a landfill, are sent to New York Harbor, amassed in large numbers where they serve to anchor new reefs in the waters surrounding Manhattan.

Humpback whales spotted feeding in Boston Harbor

  Humpback whales spotted feeding in Boston Harbor BOSTON - People taking whale watch cruises out of Boston usually have to travel miles out to sea to spot whales. But several humpback whales have been spotted in the harbour in the last few days, providing thrills just a quarter mile from downtown Boston. The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation posted a video on Twitter of a whale breaching, calling it a "beautiful and rare sight to see." The presence of whales in the busy harbour also comes with a warning. The Coast Guard is urging mariners to use "extreme caution" and keep a safe distance from whales.

Little did I know, oyster shells are being recycled in an attempt to restore the shoreline in Louisiana. According to the Coalition to Restore Coastal The program uses the oyster shells to restore the reef on the coast. This is important because the reef provides an barrier for storm surges coming into the

Without oysters , New York Harbor ’s ecosystem lacks a crucial element. One way to create beds is to use pieces of porcelain that have been recycled from Oysters may not object to effluent, but it’s an unnerving aspect of New York life that so much of the city’s waste is still dumped into the harbor .

a close up of a bottle: A History of the Lower East Side Pickle Wars© Provided by Food52 A History of the Lower East Side Pickle Wars A History of the Lower East Side Pickle Wars by Talia Ralph a group of people on a beach: What It's Like to Be an Oyster Farmer© Provided by Food52 What It's Like to Be an Oyster Farmer What It's Like to Be an Oyster Farmer by Caroline Lange

The restaurant collection program is but one arm of the organization's oyster appreciation. Ultimately, they want to create an environment in New York Harbor that allows for live oysters to flourish in its waters. By 2035, they hope to have 100 billion oysters distributed around 100 acres of reef.

The inspiration for their project is rooted in history. The Billion Oyster Project calls upon New York Harbor’s rich legacy as one of the most productive and plentiful water spaces in the North Atlantic. Their mission hearkens to a day when New York City once proudly wore the label of oyster capital of the world.

Long before English explorer Henry Hudson arrived in what is now New York Harbor, the Lenape people (New York’s native population) were pulling from the waters great quantities of oysters. Early European settlers marveled at the size and number of the bounty upon their arrival.

New York City Authorities Help Rescue Sick Cruise Passenger

  New York City Authorities Help Rescue Sick Cruise Passenger The woman was suffering from chest pains as the ship departed the harbor.Officials had to determine the best way to remove the passenger from the ship since there was not enough room to land a helicopter on the deck. An NYPD Harbor Unit boat responded to the scene.

While New York Harbor is somewhat cleaner than it was a few decades ago Now, one group of conservationists is trying to reintroduce oysters back to the area, and they’re starting off by dumping thousands of toilets into However, the New York City oyster might be inching towards a comeback.

Harbor oyster shells from these middens measured up to 10 inches, and early European travellers describe the shellfish as being about a foot in Street vending of oysters , along with hot corn, peanuts, and buns, was part of New York ’s regular food distribution system. While visiting New York

Much has been said about New York City’s long history with the famous fruit of the sea: That there once existed over 200,000 acres of oyster reefs in the waters surrounding the city. That before hotdogs and dollar slices, oysters on the half shell were the city’s most iconic street food. That Pearl Street, a downtown thoroughfare, was named after the shell’s iridescent contents. That the whole city once shut down to honor Thomas Downing, a famed and beloved black oyster salesman.

a pot with food in it: An Oyster Pan Roast That Tastes Like Sweet Home (in Washington, D.C.)© Provided by Food52 An Oyster Pan Roast That Tastes Like Sweet Home (in Washington, D.C.)

An Oyster Pan Roast That Tastes Like Sweet Home (in Washington, D.C.) by Valerio Farris

Yet much of that reality slipped away as the city, and its pollution, multiplied. Contaminated waters combined with overharvesting led to the city’s closing of their oyster beds in 1927. Oyster consumption continued, but at a reduced scale. New Yorkers were no longer eating their very own oysters, and New York City was no longer the world’s oyster capital.

The Billion Oyster Project hopes to reinstate that legacy.

New hotel opens on shores of Chautauqua Lake

  New hotel opens on shores of Chautauqua Lake CELORON, N.Y. - A new, 135-room lakeside hotel has opened in actress Lucille Ball's western New York hometown. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Thursday to officially open the Chautauqua (shuh-TAW'-kwuh) Harbor Hotel in the village of Celoron, on the eastern end of Chautauqua Lake. The complex was built on the site of an amusement park that closed in 1962 and features indoor and outdoor pools, bars and restaurants, a fitness centre and a ballroom and conference centre.The project received a nearly $2 million economic development grant from the state. Democratic Gov.

Now, the Billion Oyster Project is building a long-term plan to restore 100 acres of oyster reefs by housing one billion live oysters in New York Harbor The structure itself is made up of 250 custom-cast “reef balls” made of a special concrete mixture that uses oyster shells as aggregate and are

After reassembling the oyster bags into the cage and dropping it back down below, we checked on Bren's mussels. Imagine a very, very long fishnet stocking filled with tiny mussels -- that's how they're grown. Why Thousands of Oyster Shells Are Being Dumped Into New York Harbor .

The organization's goal isn’t just waste management, but to use the oysters to restore environmental equilibrium to New York Harbor. According to Maddy Wachtel, who runs the restaurant collection program, “The primary benefits of having oysters is that they help with the balancing and filtering of different elements in the water. They also provide a lot of habitats for marine species. They can also protect the shoreline.”

In addition to the restaurants from which they collect discarded shells, the organization is quick to engage other institutions: “We work with many schools across the city, nearly a hundred. The New York Harbor School, located on Governors Island, is a maritime high school—the students are taking on a significant leadership role by helping us out in the field, thereby gaining technical skills like growing oysters, welding reef structures, and ocean engineering.”

Unfortunately, due to the level of water pollution surrounding New York, the oysters themselves aren’t edible. “At the moment we have six oyster reefs involved across the five boroughs. We’re working on five more now,” Jennifer Ballesteros, the Communications Manager at the Billion Oyster Project tells me.

There's one in Canarsie and another by Governors Island. They just recently installed one near Coney Island. Ballesteros mentions some by Jamaica Bay, as well. Some reefs, like the ones they're installing near Staten Island, will help with breakwaters, easing the sometimes violent flow of water as it enters the harbor. They estimate that this may help temper the damage done by storms like Sandy.

Suspicious Rental Car Causes Flight Delays, Cancellations at Phoenix Airport

  Suspicious Rental Car Causes Flight Delays, Cancellations at Phoenix Airport Almost 300 flights were delayed or canceled as a result of the incident.According to AZCentral.com, the Arizona airport’s Terminal 4 was temporarily closed and all passengers waiting inside were evacuated after police were notified of a suspicious rental car left in a curb lane.

There were once billions of oysters in the waters surrounding New York City. Providing students access to the waterfront is why the Harbor School is so important, he says. With several larvae attached, the shells are then transported to the nurseries at the Billion Oyster Project’s Governors

Eating a New York Harbor oyster is forbidden and potentially illness-inducing. Oysters would be central to this curriculum, and not just for historical reasons. In a healthy marine ecosystem The shells were fastened with plastic loops to two-foot-square grids that had been fashioned from PVC

a bowl of food on a table: Hey! What Are These Oysters Doing in My Stuffing?© Provided by Food52 Hey! What Are These Oysters Doing in My Stuffing?

Hey! What Are These Oysters Doing in My Stuffing? by Caroline Lange

There are two types of oysters that comprise every new reef: live oysters that attach themselves to the top where they filter water, and dead ones at the bottom, a giant mound of shells licked clean by hungry New Yorkers across the city.

“In the beginning it was just myself and a teammate who would walk into restaurants and try to sell them on our program,” Wachtel remembers. Now, she traverses the city visiting her cadre of over 70 restaurants, often multiple times a week. (Depending on the restaurant, she’ll give them a five-gallon bucket, a 32-gallon bin, or a 64-gallon barrel.) “We try to share with the restaurants we work with the history of New York harbor and why it’s important that oysters live there. We try to make the whole process as straightforward as possible.”

At the moment we have six oyster reefs involved across the five boroughs. We’re working on five more now. Share

Earlier this month, Blue Point Brewing pledged $20,000 to the nonprofit and released a beer to honor the organization’s work. They're titling their new ale, aptly: Good Reef Ale.

So much of the energy at the Billion Oyster Project is spent on education. Ensuring that not just students, but also New Yorkers at large, understand the important of the waterways around them: “There’s a way for all people to learn about their blue space in the way they learn about their green space,” Wachtel says.

Thomas Downing and his iconic oyster restaurant are but relics of the past, and oyster carts no longer dot the city’s streets. Yet oysters, as part of the fabric of New York, are here to stay: The shells New Yorkers slurp on hot summer afternoons may no longer come from their surrounding waters, but that doesn’t mean that isn’t where they’ll end up.

a plate of food on a table© Provided by Food52

These Old-School Stuffed Shells Will Make You Feel Like a Member of an Exclusive Club .
When you can’t go to Palizzi’s in Philadelphia (and you can’t), you can make their shells at home.When I set out to make the Stuffed Shells with Marinara from Palizzi Social Club in Philadelphia, BA’s fourth Best New Restaurant in 2017, I had no idea that I wouldn’t be able to go to Palizzi to try the officially-sanctioned shells.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!