Health: The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger - PressFrom - Canada
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Health The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger

19:36  16 february  2017
19:36  16 february  2017 Source:   vox.com?utm_source=MSNbanner

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The anti - vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger . Shortly after meeting with Trump in January, the environmental activist claimed he was invited to head a vaccine commission — a statement that sent the scientific community into a tizzy but was later denied by Trump’s spokespeople.

Much of the anti - vaccine debate surrounds the link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) and autism. Our public health system has suffered from the polarization of health policy; the anti - vaccine movement might only get stronger with increased political attention heading into 2016.

  The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger © Provided by Vox.com

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

If there were ever a moment to worry that anti-vaxxers could win, this is it.

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Anti - vaccination positions and vaccination controversies are not limited to the past. Prevention, was stronger in the United States.[9] Although the media storm instigated several lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers, increased vaccine prices, and caused some companies to stop making DTP

The anti - vaccine movement has always been around and they are likely not going anywhere, whether or not they are growing . It is at this point that the anti - vaccine movement is able to be the most effective. resumption of confidence stage – after the loss of confidence in stage three leads to a drop

On March 31, anti-vaccine activists plan to march on Washington to defend what they call their “legal right to make informed, voluntary vaccine choices.”

So far, very few people have signed up to join this group of pseudoscience promoters, thankfully. But the “call to action” at this moment in history signals something alarming: The anti-vaccine movement seems to be energized under President Donald Trump. And that’sdangerous, given that lately, vaccine skeptics have been persuading more parents in a number of states to refuse shots for their children.

Mum pens powerful plea to anti-vaxxers after losing her daughter at just eight months old.

  Mum pens powerful plea to anti-vaxxers after losing her daughter at just eight months old. A mother has posted a powerful plea on Reddit about how vaccinations, or a lack thereof, left her mourning the loss of her eight-month-old daughter. User throwaway44321424 made a heartfelt and emotional plea to parents on the platform, writing about her own experience losing her baby and why vaccinations are so important not just for the health of your children, but for the people around you too.“Three years ago I had a baby girl, her name was Emily and I loved her more than anything,” she began.“I planned things out and did everything to make sure I could afford her and we wouldn’t be living in poverty.

The modern anti - vaccine movement is based on a fraud. A study published almost 20 years ago purported to Texas could lead the way, he said, because some public schools are dangerously close to the Although the anti - vaccine movement has been strong in other states, including California

A growing anti - vaccine movement in Europe, fuelled by social media and anti-establishment populists, is putting lives at risk and may be to blame for Populist rightwing politicians, from the US to Italy, Poland and France, have jumped on the anti - vaccine bandwagon, supporting the sceptics and

The trend is worrying enough that two top vaccine researchers published op-eds in the past month warning about the risk of more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles and mumps.

“Even a modest decrease in [vaccine coverage] rates could be enough to cause future outbreaks,” wrote Saad Omer, a leading vaccine researcher at Emory University, in a Washington Post opinion piece.

In another piece, Peter Hotez, a pediatrician at Baylor College of Medicine, wrote, “I’m worried that our nation’s health will soon be threatened because we have not stood up to the pseudoscience and fake conspiracy claims of this movement.”

They’re right to be concerned. We now have a president who courts known anti-vaccine crackpots and makes the same kinds of pseudoscience claims about lifesaving immunizations that they do. If there was ever a moment to worry that the anti-vaxxers could win, this is it.

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The modern anti - vaccine movement is based on a fraud. A study published almost 20 years ago purported to Texas could lead the way, he said, because some public schools are dangerously close to the Although the anti - vaccine movement has been strong in other states, including California

A history of the anti - vaccine movement . So how great is their influence? And is it growing stronger ? The main way to measure how many kids aren’t getting vaccinated by choice is finding out which proportion of kids get exempted from school vaccine requirements for nonmedical — that

Vaccine refusals are rising in many parts of the country because states have made it easier for parents to opt out

Let’s be clear about something up front: Most American children still get their shots. More than 90 percent of kids receive vaccines for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, and chickenpox, though the coverage rates are slightly lower for other routine vaccines. Most American parents also say they support school-based vaccine requirements.

States started to mandate that school children get inoculated against diseases because we need vaccination rates to remain high to sustain what’s called “herd immunity.” For any vaccine to be effective and prevent outbreaks, a certain (high) percentage of people in a population need to be immunized. This keeps diseases from spreading easily, and keeps vulnerable groups that can't be vaccinated (such as very young babies or people with allergies to vaccines) protected.

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The anti - vaccine movement is quickly gaining traction, and we all need to watch our backs. The addition of the philosophical exemption has almost strengthened the anti - vaccine movement , as it gives credence to the idea that vaccines are something easily opted out of - something that is so

Nevertheless, the anti - vaccination movement continues to promote myths, conspiracy theories and misinformation linking the two.[142] A developing tactic appears to be the "promotion of irrelevant research [as] an active aggregation of several questionable or peripherally related research studies in

And yet, since vaccination was invented more than 200 years ago, anti-vaxxers have been organizing. The seeds of the modern anti-vaccine movement can be traced back to bogus 1990s research by Andrew Wakefield, a discredited physician-researcher who linked the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine to autism. Since then, a small but vociferous community of activists — abetted by doctors who enable them — have been spreading unfounded fears among parents about vaccine safety.

As David Gorski, a surgeon who has tracked the movement, wrote in a recent blog post, Hard-core antivaxers are a minority. They are and remain cranks. … Unfortunately, they have an outsized influence on reasonable parents who just don’t have the scientific background to recognize their misinformation and pseudoscience for what they are, contributing to vaccine hesitancy.”

A history of the anti-vaccine movement.

So how great is their influence? And is it growing stronger? In the past couple of years, there haven’t been any new peer-reviewed studies on national trends in vaccine refusal. But the latest evidence we have from individual states, in combination with older studies on vaccine coverage rates and recent surveys of doctors, suggest there’s a growing problem in several parts of the country.

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The pro- vaccine movement is getting a lot of headlines mocking Jenny McCarthy and her stance. The anti - vaccine movement , IMO, is a way they can make the United States a two-tier, rich/poor Third World country by He couldn't use one of his arms and one of his legs and grew to be only 5 feet tall.

Anti - Vaccine Scientific Support Arsenal. Scientific proof the media won't tell you about. Vaccines DO Cause Autism-Undeniable Scientific Proof. Its rendering our kids helpless to ensure the future generations are beyond dosile in lamemans terms retarded to ensure theyre agenda grows n ceases

The main way to measure how many kids aren’t getting vaccinated by choice is finding out which proportion of kids get exempted from school vaccine requirements for nonmedical — that is, personal belief or religious — reasons. Since immunization laws are state-based, there’s variation across the country when it comes to the requirements. As of August 2016, all 50 states have legislation requiring vaccines for students — but almost every state allows exemptions for people with religious beliefs against immunizations, and 18 states grant philosophical exemptions for those opposed to vaccines because of personal or moral beliefs (with the exception of Mississippi, California, and West Virginia, which have the strictest vaccine laws in the nation).

Leah Samuel of Stat News crunched the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data on nonmedical exemptions from 2009 to 2016 (her numbers, however, weren’t peer-reviewed, like some of the other studies I’ll describe next). She found that the volume of people seeking exemptions was greater in 2016 than at any other point since 2009 in 11 states: Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia. She also found the national average for nonmedical exemptions was down in 2016 from a 2009 spike — a fact she attributes to California and Vermont’s 2015 cancellation of their personal belief exemptions.

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Anti - vaccine hot spots are worsening in most of the states that allow easy philosophical or “A social movement of public health vaccine opposition has been growing in the United States in “Then what happened was the anti - vaccine groups were very strong , well-organized and became well-funded.

The World Health Organization has ranked vaccine hesitancy — the growing resistance to widely available lifesaving vaccines — as one of the top 10 health threats in the world for 2019. That news will not come as a surprise in New York City

Some of the best peer-reviewed evidence for an increase in the number of people refusing or delaying vaccines comes from Emory’s Saad Omer.

In one 2009 New England Journal of Medicine paper, Omer looked at the state-level rates of nonmedical exemptions. He finds that between 1991 and 2004, those ratesincreased from less than 0.98 percent to about 1.5 percent. Again, this uptick was not spread evenly across the US, and even varied within states.

  The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger © Provided by Vox.com New England Journal of Medicine Rates of Exemption From Vaccination for Nonmedical Reasons in Washington Counties, 2006–2007.

Generally, though, states that allowed only religious exemptions had a steady opt-out rate of about 1 percent during the period (1991 to 2004). But in states that were more lax — allowing philosophical or personal belief exemptions as well as religious and medical exemptions — the mean exemption rate increased from 0.99 to 2.54 percent.

In a 2012 follow-up to that paper, also published in NEJM, Omer found — once again — that “non-medical exemptions have continued to increase, and the rate of increase has accelerated.”

Doctors are also reporting that they’re meeting more and more parents who are skeptical of vaccines. The American Academy of Pediatrics periodically surveys its members and identified a rise in pediatricians reporting that they had patients who refused a vaccine — from 75 percent in 2006 to 87 percent in 2013.

As for state-level analyses, Baylor’s Peter Hotez looked at the rate of nonmedical exemptionsover the past 13 years in his home state of Texas. He found that in 2016, there were almost 45,000 children who refused vaccines — about double the number of exemptions in 2010 and a 19-fold increase compared with 2003:

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The American scientist, whose new book explains why vaccines didn’t cause his daughter’s autism, on why conspiracy theorists need to be challenged.

  The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger © Provided by Vox.com PLoS One Personal belief exemptions in Texas: K–12th grade students with nonmedical exemptions, Texas, 2003–2016.

Texas is one of those lax states that allow parents to get both religious and philosophical vaccine exemptions. And other studies have shown that people who live in places that make it easy to opt out of vaccines tend to have higher rates of exemptions. In one paper, states that allowed parents to refuse vaccines for philosophical or personal reasons had exemption rates that were 2.54 times as high as states that only permitted religious exemptions. Another older study, looking at data between 1991 and 2004, found an increase in exemption rates only in states that allowed philosophical exemptions.

The “vaccine hesitant” are more common than outright vaccine deniers

There’s also evidence of another growing group of vaccine skeptics: More common than outright vaccine deniers are parents who might be better described as “vaccine delayers.” They generally agree that vaccination is a public health benefit, and they don’t identify as "anti-vaxxers." But they’re hesitant and skeptical about some areas of vaccine science, and they work with doctors to create their own vaccine schedules, choosing which vaccines to give their kids and which to skip.

“There are numerically few parents who exercise exemptions entirely against all vaccines,” said sociologist Jennifer Reich, who studies the anti-vaccine movement, in an email. “But there is evidence that as many as 20 to 25 percent of American parents feel uneasy about the number of vaccines given, feel uncertain they are entirely necessary, and wonder if they are safe.”

There are real public health consequences to these exemptions, too. As I reported last year, researchers have found that rates of whooping cough and measles are higher among people who are intentionally unvaccinated. Unvaccinated individuals were often "patient zeroes" in state outbreaks, meaning they sparked disease clusters by creating pockets of susceptibility that caused others to fall ill.

Vaccine refusers are a hugely diverse group — but they do share some common characteristics

So who exactly are the vaccine refusers putting public health at risk?

A politically and geographically diverse bunch, it turns out. “In Oregon, it’s an organic movement appealing to natural things and that we shouldn’t do unnatural things to kids’ bodies,” said Hotez. “In Texas, it seems it’s more about choice and civil liberties. ‘First they take our guns away, and now they’re trying to make us vaccinate our kids.’” There are clusters of people who refuse vaccines for religious reasons across the country, too.

  The anti-vaccine movement is growing dangerously stronger © Provided by Vox.com CDC US residents with measles who were unvaccinated, by reasons for not receiving measles vaccine.

Overall, though, they do have some things in common. Most research shows that parents who reject some or all vaccines are more likely to be white, college-educated, and married, with higher family income. They also do so for personal reasons — which tend to be concerns about vaccine safety.

That squares with Reich’s findings. She interviewed a group of parents over 10 years to learn about their vaccine views, and found “the university-educated ubermoms who favor organic food and have a tendency to avoid gluten and dairy products” were among the vaccine-hesitant, according to Times Higher Education.

In an email, she told Vox that she thinks “these factors allow parents to feel they can manage illness and health without vaccines.” In other words, families with more resources may believe they can deal with serious consequences that arise if their kids become sick. “They can afford to miss work, access hospitals, and feel best able to manage risks,” she added.

That’s just parents doing what parents do, Reich said: trying to make the best decisions for their kids. Unfortunately, their decisions aren’t rooted in science, and, she added, “Their efforts to protect their own children by avoiding vaccines may actually endanger [other people] in the community, including some who are most vulnerable to the worst outcomes of infection.”

Trump may embolden the anti-vaxxers — but states have the power to push back

Every health researcher I talked to for this piece worried that President Trump’s seeming willingness to court anti-vaxxers like Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is emboldening the movement.

Infectious diseases doctor Paul Offit has linked the growing vaccine refusal to “[this] age where science denialism is institutionalized” — noting that several of Trump’s Cabinet picks hold views that are antithetical to science. “It’s just a world turned upside down.”

“[Vaccine denialism] could get worse under Trump,” Omer said, “not only because of his rhetoric but because of the cuts to the public health funding,” referring to the fact that money for public health measures like immunizations is on the chopping block under the current Republican Congress.

The vaccine researchers also said that America’s public health community isn’t addressing the problem.

“The CDC, NIH, HHS — they don’t really want to talk about [vaccine refusers],” Hotez said. “They think if we don’t make a big deal of this problem, it will go away.”

But both Hotez and Omer would like to see more outreach by public health officials into anti-vaccine communities, and see national leaders at least acknowledge the problem and defend the lifesaving value of vaccines. “Obama, Bush, Clinton, even with all the craziness around the Wakefield [vaccine autism] paper, didn’t really have much of a voice on [this issue],” said Hotez. “It’s frustrating for me.”

This leaves ample space for the states to be more active on the issue. Again, we know that when state governments make it easier for parents to opt out of vaccines with different exemption provisions, they’re more likely to exercise that right. And lately, states have been doing a good job of fighting back against anti-vaccine forces.

This 2014 JAMA paper is instructive. The researchers found that between 2009 and 2012, states considered 36 bills related to vaccine exemptions: 31 wanted to expand them, making it easier to opt out of vaccines, while only five wanted to make vaccine exemptions more difficult to obtain. None of the 31 anti-vaccine bills passed, while three of the five bills clamping down on vaccine deniers made it, which suggests that while there was more activity from the anti-vaccine side, public health won out in state legislatures.

So states’ role in ensuring communities are immunized is more important than ever. They’ll need to be strong and organized under a president who is unlikely to be a champion of vaccines and a Congress poised to cut public health funding.

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How jelly beans made a Canadian man deathly ill, and highlighted the dangers of licorice .
Doctors were stumped by a patient with dangerously high blood pressure and low potassium. Then they discovered his bag-a-day habitThe 51-year-old man showed up at the emergency ward in crisis.

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