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Health Sir Patrick Stewart reveals he uses cannabis to help treat arthritis

17:11  16 march  2017
17:11  16 march  2017 Source:   standard.co.uk

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  Sir Patrick Stewart reveals he uses cannabis to help treat arthritis © Provided by Evening Standard Limited Sir Patrick Stewart has revealed he uses marijuana daily to treat his arthritis.

The actor, known for his role as captain Jean-Luc Picard in the Star Trek TV series, takes the legally prescribed cannabis-based medication every day as a pain relief.

Stewart opened up about using the drug as he threw his support behind Oxford University’s plans to launch a £10m research programme into the effects of medical marijuana.

The X-Men actor was first prescribed the medicene in Los Angeles after a doctor gave him a note which legally allows him to take it.

Seeking help: Sir Patrick Stewart with his wife Sunny Ozell (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty) © Provided by Evening Standard Limited Seeking help: Sir Patrick Stewart with his wife Sunny Ozell (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty) “Two years ago, in Los Angeles, I was examined by a doctor and given a note which gave me legal permission to purchase, from a registered outlet, cannabis-based products, which I was advised might help the ortho-arthritis in both my hands,” he said.

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“This, it would seem, is a genetically-based condition. My mother had badly distorted and painful hands.”

The actor, who sprays his “fingers and particularly my thumb joints several times a day”, said he believes it has “significantly reduced the stiffness and pain”.

He continued: “I have had no negative side effects from this treatment and the alternative would have been to continue taking NSAID’s, Advil, Aleve and Naproxen, which are known to be harsh on the liver and to cause acid reflux.”

Speaking about the research programme, which will examine the role of cannabis medicines in the treatment of pain, cancer and inflammatory disease, he said: “As a result of this experience, I enthusiastically support the Oxford University Cannabis Research Plan.

“This is an important step forward for Britain in a field of research that has for too long been held back by prejudice, fear and ignorance. I believe this programme of research might result in benefits for people like myself as well as millions of others.”


Do Your Knees Make Noise? You May Want To See A Doctor .
<p>Noisy knees aren't just annoying, it may be an early sign of osteoarthritis, a common degenerative joint disease.</p>A new study published online in Arthritis Care & Research found that, of high-risk people who developed osteoarthritis within a year, more than 75 percent reported no frequent knee pain despite having signs of the condition on radiographic images. Rather than pain, some of these individuals had complained of noisy knees that grated, cracked, or popped when they moved. Based on these results, researchers now believe that noisy knees should be treated as a warning sign of osteoarthritis risk.

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