•   
  •   
  •   

Health Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed

21:15  27 march  2020
21:15  27 march  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Surfaces? Sneezes? Sex? How the Coronavirus Can and Cannot Spread

  Surfaces? Sneezes? Sex? How the Coronavirus Can and Cannot Spread Because this virus is so new, experts’ understanding of how it spreads is limited. They can, however, offer some guidance about how it does — and does not — seem to be transmitted. Pictures: COVID-19 outbreak 1/182 SLIDES © Aly Song/Reuters China has been battling an outbreak of a new SARS-like coronavirus (COVID-19), which originated in Wuhan. The virus has claimed over 2,000 lives in mainland China – surpassing the death toll during the SARS outbreak in 2003 – and infected more than 75,000 people around the world. Outside mainland China, Philippines reported its first fatality on Feb.

Experts say more research is needed . Fact check : Coronavirus originated in China, not elsewhere, researchers and studies say . This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Coronavirus fact check : Could your December cough have been COVID-19?

Fact check : Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus ? Experts say more research is needed . # cough # coronavirus # December .

The claim: People who suffered from a round of illness in November and December likely had the coronavirus 

A handful of widely circulated Facebook posts have asserted that people in the United States likely contracted the coronavirus as early as last fall.

“Who got sick in November or December and it lasted 10 to 14 days, with the worst cough that wouldn’t go away?” the posts say. “If you can answer, yes, then you probably had the coronavirus. There were no tests and the flu test would come back negative anyway. They called it a severe upper respiratory infection.” 

These underlying conditions make coronavirus more severe, and they're surprisingly common

  These underlying conditions make coronavirus more severe, and they're surprisingly common A wide array of people are at risk, including those with high blood pressure and diabetes. Here's how they can prepare.High blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease are so commonplace that everyone reading these words likely knows somebody with at least one of these maladies.

Fact check : Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus ? Experts say more research is needed . While a positive result could entail a true positive – that novel coronavirus was actually detected – it could also mean contamination of the test sample (which can happen in labs

to coronavirus research (DIY masks, ventilator builds, etc.) are encouraged to post in our sister and have been wondering about this after hearing rumors but didn’t see any facts supporting them. It took a lot more actually . Ebola patients' semen was infective for upwards of many months in several

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Many of the posts currently circulating include the profile photo of a Facebook user named Donna Lee Collier. Collier did not respond to a USA TODAY request for comment on the origin of the posts. 

Bonnie Powell, of Waynesboro, Georgia, copied the status and received more than 230 shares. She said the post reflects her opinion, not necessarily scientific proof. But she said she had heard from friends about sickness at the end of last year, which makes her suspicious. 

"Our area has had a very virulent 'flu' season with many of my friends testing negative for flu," she said in a Facebook message. 

Coronavirus likely originated in November, was first in U.S. in January

Researchers have tied the origin of the virus to a live animal market in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization first received a report of the outbreak on Dec. 31, but the virus originated in China more than a month earlier than that. A study published in early March by researchers at ETH Zurich puts the origin of the virus in the first half of November

What to Know Before Making Your Own DIY Sanitizer

  What to Know Before Making Your Own DIY Sanitizer Just remember—sanitizer is not a substitute for washing your hands. People are panicked about the coronavirus, officially named COVID-19, which has caused some basic necessities such as water, toilet paper, and non-perishable foods to sell out incredibly fast as thousands rush to stockpile supplies. Another hot item that is disappearing from store shelves? Hand sanitiser. Even online retailers like Amazon are having a hard time keeping brand names of the product in stock.

* More decisive research is needed to assess its value in patients with mild disease or as pre- or There are many causes of fever. Call your healthcare provider if you need assistance or seek To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be

This fact might have you wondering if that weird cough or recurrent fever you had in late January or February was actually COVID-19. The first confirmed community spread of the coronavirus in New York was in a lawyer from Westchester County who first went to the hospital for his symptoms on Feb.

Fact check: Coronavirus originated in China, not elsewhere, researchers and studies say

Rumors surrounding the origins of the novel coronavirus have swirled as it spreads around the globe. Theories that the virus originated in a Chinese laboratory, or that it originated outside of China and was brought over by the U.S. Army, are not supported by evidence, according to medical experts. The virus is believed to have animal origins, likely in bats.

Fact check: Is COVID-19 caused by human consumption of animals?

On Jan. 21, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the first case of novel coronavirus in the United States from a person who had recently returned to Washington from Wuhan. The United States has since surpassed China and Italy to become the most infected country in the world, according to a tracker from Johns Hopkins University.  

Simple steps to help you recover from coronavirus

  Simple steps to help you recover from coronavirus Simple steps to help you recover from coronavirusWhile coronavirus is an entirely new disease and there are many unknowns, it is a virus and we have lots of experience in knowing how to recover from viral infections. Currently over 80,000 people globally have recovered from Covid-19. There are plenty of simple things that you can do at home to look after yourself and get back on your feet so you can then help those around you.

Could coronavirus have been circulating in Europe in late 2019, many weeks before it was officially recognised and declared a threat there? That is the suggestion being made after a French doctor has revealed that he treated a patient in Paris with all of the symptoms of coronavirus just after Christmas.

Facts First: Trump's claims have been comprehensively inaccurate. Trump's own officials and his Republican Trump also keeps saying that the only reason the US has shown more confirmed cases than other Fact - checking Trump's claims that US coronavirus death rate is the lowest worldwide.

Symptoms of the novel coronavirus include a fever, cough and shortness of breath. Reported illnesses range from mild symptoms to severe symptoms and death. 

Could the coronavirus have been in the U.S. before January? 

Experts say it's plausible that coronavirus came over to the U.S. from China before that first January case, but more testing is needed to be sure. 

"Anecdotally, we've heard about some influenza-like illnesses in December and January that were a little bit atypical," said Dr. Luis Ostrosky, a professor of infectious diseases at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth in Houston. "But the thing we need to solve that puzzle is when we actually start doing testing of antibodies, not just detecting the virus." 

Ostrosky said that would include taking a look at blood samples from December and January to see if the virus was already in circulation. 

Infected but Feeling Fine: The Unwitting Coronavirus Spreaders

  Infected but Feeling Fine: The Unwitting Coronavirus Spreaders As many as 25 percent of people infected with the new coronavirus may not show symptoms, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns — a startlingly high number that complicates efforts to predict the pandemic’s course and strategies to mitigate its spread. In particular, the high level of symptom-free cases is leading the C.D.C. to consider broadening its guidelines on who should wear masks. “This helps explain howIn particular, the high level of symptom-free cases is leading the C.D.C. to consider broadening its guidelines on who should wear masks.

Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, said he believes when researchers do more testing, they will probably find the disease was in the U.S. earlier than first believed. 

"I believe at the end of this, when we do look back – and we will – we will probably find that this disease was here earlier than we thought," he said. "We also know that when we closed our borders, it was very, very leaky." 

However, Benjamin said it's "plausible but not likely" that the coronavirus was in the United States in November and December. If it were in the U.S. before the end of the year, the case would also have likely been connected to travel from China, he said, and likely not widespread. 

Dr. Josh Petrie, assistant research professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said it's important to remember that multiple existing viruses can cause severe upper respiratory symptoms and circulated late last year. Among them was Influenza B, which grew in intensity around November and December, as well as RSV and Influenza A.

He said it's possible there were "sporadic" travel-related cases earlier than the discovery of the first case but agreed it was likely not widespread as far back as November or December. 

Doctors Explain What a Dry Cough Actually Feels Like for Coronavirus

  Doctors Explain What a Dry Cough Actually Feels Like for Coronavirus Plus, when you should see a doctor.But it’s important to know what to look out for. A fever—the leading symptom in COVID-19 cases, per the World Health Organization (WHO)—is anything 100.4° F or higher when you take your temperature. Shortness of breath, one of the distinguishing features of COVID-19, often presents in more advanced cases and can feel like you’re “hungry” for air, experts say.

"There's a lot of surveillance that goes on for influenza every year, and so if we were seeing a lot of coronavirus activity at that time – even if you couldn't test for it – you would see signals in that influenza surveillance," he said. 

Would already having the coronavirus make someone immune to further infection by it? That's also still under investigation. Ostrosky said that, in general terms, other coronaviruses do result in built-up immunity. 

A New York Times article published Wednesday about research efforts underway to study antibodies characterized the answer to the immunity question as "a qualified yes, with some significant unknowns." Dr. Vineet D. Menachery, a virologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, told the Times that people who are infected may have one to two years of immunity, with any longer time span hard to predict. 

Our ruling: More information needed

At this point, experts contacted by USA TODAY say it's unlikely that just because someone had a cough or other symptoms of an upper respiratory infection that they "probably had the coronavirus," especially as far back as November. 

But it's also plausible that some cases did arrive in the U.S. earlier than the first reported case in January. Experts say additional testing and research is needed to get an exact picture. 

Our fact-check sources:

  • USA TODAY: Fact check: Coronavirus originated in China, not elsewhere, researchers and studies say 

    Survivors of Coronavirus Face an Uncertain Road Back to Normal

      Survivors of Coronavirus Face an Uncertain Road Back to Normal Guidelines about when patients in recovery can safely resume some aspects of their pre-coronavirus lives vary greatly around the globe, and even within countries. Get news and analysis on politics, policy, national security and more, delivered right to your inboxAdding to the uncertainty, some guidelines differ depending on the severity and type of case. Authorities in Australia have three sets of guidelines: for people who have mild cases and recover completely at home, for people who have been hospitalized, and for health-care workers.

  • USA TODAY: Fact check: Did the coronavirus originate in a Chinese laboratory? 

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information on common human coronaviruses 

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Information on the novel coronavirus 

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: First travel-related case of 2019 novel coronavirus detected in U.S.

  • ETH Zurich: Study on COVID-19 Origins

  • Johns Hopkins University: Coronavirus case map

  • The New York Times: Can you become immune to the coronavirus? 

Ian Richardson covers the Iowa Statehouse for the Register. Reach him at irichardson@registermedia.com, at 515-284-8254, or on Twitter at @DMRIanR.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed

COVID-19 expert: Coronavirus will rage 'until it infects everybody it possibly can' .
Michael Osterhom, an infectious disease researcher, warns up to 70 percent of people might become infected by COVID-19 unless a vaccine works.For the most up-to-date COVID-19 information from the Canadian government please visit Canada.

usr: 3
This is interesting!