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Health This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s

07:02  13 july  2018
07:02  13 july  2018 Source:   time.com

The First Warning Sign of Alzheimer's May Surprise You

  The First Warning Sign of Alzheimer's May Surprise You The First Warning Sign of Alzheimer's May Surprise YouWe've all heard the stories of the grandma who got lost on her way home from the grocery store, or the great uncle who relies on GPS for the drive to his weekly doctor's appointment, but now there's research to back up the anecdotal evidence that trouble finding your way around may indicate a much bigger problem.

The study provides more evidence that blood pressure may be one of the many factors that can contribute to aging brain processes, including the formation of lesions and hallmark features of diseases like Alzheimer ’ s .

Alzheimer ' s risk factors – learn how genetics, heredity, age and family history increase the risk of Alzheimer ’ s and factors you may be able to Sleep deprivation may raise the risk of getting Alzheimer ' s disease. Just one sleepless night has been found to cause the build-up of a protein

  This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s © PeopleImages/Getty Images Outside of your genetic makeup, few things are definitively linked to Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative brain conditions. Unlike heart disease, which is affected by behaviors like diet, exercise and smoking, science hasn’t documented many risk factors that make the brain more vulnerable to dementia—although there are hints that things like physical activity and brain games might help to protect against cognitive decline.

But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.

The First Warning Sign of Alzheimer's May Surprise You

  The First Warning Sign of Alzheimer's May Surprise You This problem crops up long before any clinical diagnosis of the disease​. We've all heard the stories of the grandma who got lost on her way home from the grocery store, or the great uncle who relies on GPS for the drive to his weekly doctor's appointment, but now there's research to back up the anecdotal evidence that trouble finding your way around may indicate a much bigger problem.Problems navigating new surroundings crop up before memory loss, and long before any clinical diagnosis of the disease, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Alzheimer ' s risk factors – learn how genetics, heredity, age and family history increase the risk of Alzheimer ’ s and factors you may be able to influence. Previous studies have implicated high blood pressure as a possible risk factor for dementia, including Alzheimer ’ s dementia, but there are few

Alzheimer ' s Risk Factors . What Causes Alzheimer ' s Disease and Who Gets It. Smoking didn't raise the already elevated risk of Alzheimer ' s in those who had the APOE-e4 gene. But a surprising 2007 study also found that people who were around others but felt lonely (emotional.

Previous studies have implicated high blood pressure as a possible risk factor for dementia, including Alzheimer’s dementia, but there are few studies exploring how blood pressure, particularly among older people, affects tissues in the brain. In the study, Arvanitakis and her colleagues measured the blood pressure of nearly 1,300 elderly people, aged 59 to 102 years, and followed them until they died, on average eight years after enrolling in the study. The scientists performed autopsies on the brains to document the presence of brain lesions, including signs of Alzheimer’s disease, which is characterized by the presence of protein plaques known as amyloid, and tangles of dying and dead nerve fibrils known as tau.

Also watch: Do I have Alzheimer's? Five questions to ask yourself (Provided by Fox News)

What to Eat (and What Not to Eat) to Help Prevent Dementia

  What to Eat (and What Not to Eat) to Help Prevent Dementia Brain researchers have developed a "diet for the mind" that could prevent the kind of loss of memory, focus, and judgment that define dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.A diet to treat Alzheimer’s would normalize vitamin D levels; optimize omega-3 intake; restrict omega-6 fats, fructose, protein, and carbs; and limit daily eating to a brief window of about 5 hours each day—because this type of intermittent fasting encourages autophagy, which recycles human cells and is a key part of the body’s immune immune defense against bacterial infection.

Alzheimer ' s risk factors – learn how genetics, heredity, age and family history increase the risk of Alzheimer ’ s and factors you may be able to influence. Previous studies have implicated high blood pressure as a possible risk factor for dementia, including Alzheimer ’ s dementia, but there are few

Alzheimer ' s causes and risk factors – learn how genetics, heredity, age and family history increase risk and factors you may be able to influence. The greatest known risk factor for Alzheimer ’ s is increasing age.

The American Heart Association says that blood pressure should ideally be 120/80 mmHg or below. During the study, the average blood pressure was about 134/71 mmHg, which is considered pre-hypertensive. People with higher blood pressure across the study period tended to have more brain lesions, known as infarcts, which are areas of dead brain tissue that have lost their blood supply. Infarcts can lead to strokes, but many go undetected. People with higher blood pressure also showed more tau tangles, although they did not show significant differences in the other Alzheimer’s feature, amyloid plaques. In fact, an increase in systolic pressure (the top blood pressure number) from 134 mmHg to 147 mmHg was linked to a 46% higher chance of having one or more brain infarcts.

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s

  This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s In a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.

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This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer ’ s .

In a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer ’ s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk

“We think that it’s potentially biologically plausible that altered blood pressure later in life can cause infarcts [in the brain], given the body of literature in which we know that blood pressure is associated with stroke,” says Arvanitakis. She says the study does not show that high blood pressure actually causes brain lesions, and further research is needed to explore that connection.

MORE:Young People’s Blood Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s

The study provides more evidence that blood pressure may be one of the many factors that can contribute to aging brain processes, including the formation of lesions and hallmark features of diseases like Alzheimer’s. Arvanitakis says she and her team plan to continue analyzing data from the participants to better understand how blood pressure affects the brain—including, for example, whether those who lowered their blood pressure during the study were able to reduce the formation of infarcts. (Interestingly, people with extreme drops in blood pressure during the study also had a higher risk of more infarcts, likely because the decline represented other serious health issues.)

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s

  This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer’s In a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, find more evidence that blood pressure may be one of those risk factors.

time.com This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer ’ s . High blood pressure isn't just bad for the heart.

High blood pressure isn't just bad for the heart

Also watch: Supporting caregivers of Alzheimer patients (Provided by Breakfast Television)

Most of the people in the study were taking medications to keep their blood pressure under control, but she notes that higher readings, even if they weren’t excessively high, were associated with more brain lesions. “We are not talking here about people with very high blood pressure,” she says. “We’re talking about pretty average blood pressure and what blood pressure across the whole range of readings can do to the brain.”

Until more research is done, Arvanitakis says the results should encourage people to focus on maintaining healthy blood pressure not just for their heart, but for brain health, as well. “Many, many issues are important for brain health and for avoiding brain diseases,” she says, “so we should consider them all in order to be as healthy as possible as we grow into the later stage of life.”

Gallery: 15 Things Neurologists Do to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease (Reader's Digest)Understand Alzheimer's disease: Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia, accounting for approximately 80 percent of dementia cases and affecting more than 5.5 million people in the United States. But all dementia is not Alzheimer's, says David Knopman, MD, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota, and Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology. Dementia is a general term used to describe a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving, or language. Alzheimer's is a physical disease that targets the brain, causing problems with memory, thinking, and behavior. It is also age-related (symptoms usually start at age 65) and progressive as symptoms usually develop slowly and worsen over time. Research shows that plaques and tangles, two proteins that build up and block connections between nerve cells and eventually damage and kill nerve cells in the brain, cause the symptoms of the disease. Learn more about the difference between Alzheimer's and dementia. 15 Things Neurologists Do to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

8 Weird Things Linked to Memory Loss Later in Life .
8 Weird Things Linked to Memory Loss Later in LifeBut there are lots of other factors that can affect your risk of dementia or age-related memory loss. Some are obvious (like genetics). Others are less so. Here are a few that might surprise you.

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