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Travel 32 Ways We're Making the Holidays Feel Special This Year

16:10  26 november  2020
16:10  26 november  2020 Source:   cntraveler.com

How We're Thinking About Money for Future Trips: Women Who Travel Podcast

  How We're Thinking About Money for Future Trips: Women Who Travel Podcast Plus, what to do with all those points and miles.When we recorded our “Honest Conversation About Saving and Budgeting for Travel” episode back in February, we had big plans for saving for travel, sure, but even bigger plans for spending those savings. Unfortunately, most, if not all, of those big spender dreams have been dashed, but one of this week's guests, Bourree Lam, The Wall Street Journal's personal finance bureau chief, has found the silver lining: “One way to think about [travel savings] may be that if you're saving for a big trip, you actually have more time to do that now, so you can be more ambitious.

We ' re talking virtualized traditions, distanced food swaps, and, of course, some good ol' binge-watching. That way , we can still feel together while we eat our meals." 14. " This year , we are doing a food swap. One family will make the sides, the other one will make the rest, and we'll meet

Specialist holidays There is a great variety of specialist holidays from skiing to golf, from wine The weather was sunny and this naturally made a vast difference. I would say it turned out an ideal In a boarding house or a hotel you generally feel quite happy about leaving a six- year -old sleeping for an

  32 Ways We're Making the Holidays Feel Special This Year © Courtesy Milk Bar

This holiday season is unlike any other. With stay at home orders and travel advisories in affect across the country, many of us are foregoing our annual family get togethers this year, settling instead for more intimate gatherings with our immediate households or bubbles. But that doesn't mean we can't instill a sense of festivity into the holidays—and boy, do we deserve it after this year—which is why we've tapped our network of chefs, hoteliers, bartenders, editors, and more to find out how they're planning to make the holidays feel special, wherever they're spending them. Keep reading for a whole slew of holiday tips and inspiration, from the recipes to cook and the drinks to make, to ideas for creating brand new traditions.

This Is The Most Overrated Item At The Grocery Store Right Now

  This Is The Most Overrated Item At The Grocery Store Right Now Sales of an overrated grocery item have skyrocketed this year, but there tons of reasons you should skip adding it to your list.During a 10-day period between March 11 and 21, sales of baking mixes skyrocketed 159%, and sales of sugar jumped 118%, according to newly released data from NCSolutions (NCS). Spending on baking mixes increased 38% from late February through the end of September. Sugar sales went up by 26%, desserts by 19%, ice cream by 16%, and cookies by 10%. (Related: 52 Life-Changing Kitchen Hacks That'll Make You Enjoy Cooking Again.

A. Every year , we (send) each other cards and (give) each other presents at Christmas Day. B. Today Mr. Smith is (decorating) his house with coloured lights and a Christmas tree. C. On New Year 's Eve, people often have a party with their families and friends and they celebrate it with fireworks too.

Moreover, when you are feeling under the weather, there is nothing like a sweet pair of eyes that immediately get your mind off thoughts that are making you sad and depressed. We are currently 17th highest achievers in England but if we really try hard this year we might make top 10.

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Master some new recipes

Throw a Zoom baking party: We’re all experiencing a bit of virtual gathering fatigue at this point in the year, but with a little coordination and imagination, it’s a great way to get your loved ones together for a good baking session. Sometimes I take it another step and send ingredients [in advance] (it ensures most fun levels of participation!). If anyone finds themselves with leftover treats: pack your goodies up in a cellophane bag, write a little note, include a gift tag, and give them to your neighbor, doorman, mail carrier, local volunteer squad, you name it. Baking is altruistic—and treats are meant to be shared. —Christina Tosi, chef and founder of Milk Bar

The holidays will be different this year — here's what to say to kids

  The holidays will be different this year — here's what to say to kids Experts say there are many ways parents can create new holiday traditions for their kids.“Don't assume that your kids are mad about it just because you are. There are plenty of things that we put our kids through family-wise at the holidays because it's the right thing to do,” Dr. Deborah Gilboa, a parenting and resiliency expert, told TODAY Parents. “But this might be fantastic news for some of your kids.

'Look it had been Number 1 on the Holiday Charts for years and years and I wasn't focused on it, but my lambs, my fans, the greatest people on earth Mariah Carey's Magical Christmas Special will air on Apple TV+ on December 4 and she also will release the new soundtrack single and music video for

3. __ it stops raining, we won’t be able to go to the zoo. 4. __ you decide to come to the concert, give me a call. 5. You’ll be late __ you leave now. 6. __ the pain gets worse, you will have to go to the doctor.

Firstly, I’m planning to take this MasterClass with Massimo Bottura between Christmas and New Year’s, and make a new dish from it every night. Secondly, I’m treating myself to this absolutely over-the-top cheese: Vacherin Mont d’Or. It’s made from the winter milk from the same cows that make gruyere, on the border of Switzerland and France. As such, it’s only available from around October to April, and it’s a Christmas delicacy in both countries. Murray’s Cheeses, which ships wheels of it around the country, calls it “one of the most sought-after cheeses on the market.” —Jessica Puckett, transportation editor

Dropping off snacks and recipes with loved ones helps create memories and a shared experience—two things we really crave during the holidays. I'm making aperitivo snacks to drop off with friends: spicy sumac and pomegranate nuts (a recipe from Ernesto's), jars of cured lemons I've been stealing from my neighbor's tree, buckwheat banana bread from The Smile, and orange zest and turmeric granola. I also bring a batch of fresh pasta everywhere I go these days. I've been making trofie with chestnut flour, the nutty flavor is so comforting and it fits all diets. —Melanie Masarin, founder of Ghia

Not Coming Home for the Holidays? Here’s How to Break the News to Your Family

  Not Coming Home for the Holidays? Here’s How to Break the News to Your Family It’s the responsible thing to do, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. Here’s how to tell your family. By now, you know that this year’s holiday season can’t go on like normal. COVID-19 infections are surging across the country, with small gatherings among family and friends fueling the rise in cases. That means now is a crucial time to weigh safety against comfort.

This remark is usually made in July and is received glumly, as if the person making it has said ‘I suppose we ought to think about the Bolivian balance of payment problems.’ Nothing much happens for a week and then the potential holiday -makers are rounded up and made to consult their diaries.

But when we ' re together, we always 12 really well. Some people say that opposites attract, and for Last year , it was so popular that the organizers had to close online registration because there were no more We 1 're starting (start) our trip in about five minutes, so please make yourselves comfortable.

I’m planning to do a lot of cooking over the holidays (without a crowd to serve, it actually sounds relaxing this year), so I’m treating myself to a few kitchen essentials I’ve been eyeing for months. For my spice rack, a few jars of single origin spices from Diaspora Co., plus a jar of Sichuan Chili Crisp from Fly By Jing; and to pour onto everything I eat, bottles of olive oil from female-owned Kosterina and Brightland. —Megan Spurrell, associate editor

diagram, schematic: Try your hand at a recipe from Serving New York, a new cookbook celebrating New York City restaurants. © Condé Nast Traveler Try your hand at a recipe from Serving New York, a new cookbook celebrating New York City restaurants.

I'm a big snacker, so I'm going to make the fun spin on Chex Mix that I had when I dined at Tokyo Record Bar, one of my favorite restaurant experiences in all of New York. Even better: the chefs shared the recipe in Serving New York, a cookbook celebrating New York City restaurants that has just released a new hardbound printing. All proceeds go to ROAR and Robin Hood's Restaurant Relief Fund, which provide cash assistance to area restaurant workers. —Corina Quinn, director, city guides

Disney World Is Bringing Back Its Park Hopper Pass in 2021

  Disney World Is Bringing Back Its Park Hopper Pass in 2021 Start your day with a safari ride in Animal Kingdom and end it with a delicious dinner in Epcot. Gallery: 16 of the most festive places to spend the holidays in the US (INSIDER) Park Hopper hours are, for now, scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. and will end at the parks’ close at 8 p.m. The hours may change throughout the year. The pre-visit reservation is required due to COVID-19 regulations — and visitors might not be able to park hop if one of their intended parks is already at capacity.

Or pre-order an extravagant meal

My new favorite New York City find is Milu, a Chinese family-style restaurant run by Connie Chung, an Eleven Madison Park vet. We ordered the two-person feast for $45, which comes with an incredible slow-cooked duck, Sichuan cauliflower, duck-fat rice, pickled cucumbers, and a bunch of other sides. It was a fantastic celebration meal (that, yes, we just had on a regular weeknight because why not?) where we didn’t have to lift a finger. —Stephanie Wu, articles director

To ease the burden of meal prep [of holiday meals], we’re ordering a date pecan pie from Minneapolis’ excellent Vikings & Goddesses Pie Company. And because I don’t want my parents to feel left out, even virtually, I'm shipping them an old-fashioned pecan pie from Blue Owl Bakery in Kimmswick, Missouri via Goldbelly. —Ashlea Halpern, contributor

a plate of food: Officina Provisions in Washington D.C. is offering Italian meal prep kits. © Courtesy Officina Provisions Officina Provisions in Washington D.C. is offering Italian meal prep kits.

For my D.C.-area family, the must-order meal delivery this year has become Officina Provisions, from local chef Nick Stefanelli, who presides over some of the area's finest Italian kitchens. Designed to deliver a week’s worth of quality dishes straight to your doorstep, each kit includes oven-ready prepared meals, premium cuts from the Officina butcher, fresh local produce, and other extras, like artisan baked bread or the ability to add on a curated selection of top-notch wines. Each box feeds a family of four, and the restaurants deliver throughout D.C. proper, northern Virginia, and Maryland. —C.Q.

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  Sure Signs You Had a Heart Attack, Like Maradona These are signs of a heart attack according to a doctor: pressure like chest pain, shortness of breath, sweating, vomiting, heartburn, arm pain.

Yes, you can get your holiday meal prepared by one of the best restaurants in the world. Since the pandemic began closing down restaurants all over America, Dan Barber began putting together farm boxes from Stone Barns (not only a regular fixture on world’s best restaurant lists, but also a leading light in a resurgent American farming movement). For Thanksgiving they included hazelnut and mushroom stuffing, koginut squash soup, honeynut pumpkin pie, and roasted half turkey (there’s a whole menu but those are a few highlights). You can also order one of their pasture-raised turkeys to cook yourself. I picked one up a couple years ago and I can verify it is worth the much-elevated price tag over what you pay at the grocery store. If you're in New York City, Tarrytown, NY, or Sharon, CT, check back on their website in December to see what they’re cooking up for Christmas and New Year's. —Noah Kaufman, editor, city guides

Create new traditions

Put a Christmas record on the turntable or queue up a holiday Spotify playlist. There are some great collections out there, and even though I hate being forced to hear holiday music in retail stores right after Halloween, I really love hearing Odetta’s Christmas Spirituals while drinking wine and making a special dinner, or Vince Guiraldi’s O Tannenbaum on a quiet morning. If not now, when? —Liz Lambert, principal, Lambert McGuire Design, and founder of Bunkhouse Hotels

I haven’t seen my family in nine months and neither has my son, who’s two, and not being able to see them for the holidays is crushing. To bring a bit of home (Chicago) and my Filipino culture to our holidays, I’m starting a tradition of making dumplings for Thanksgiving. My mother always made pancit molo, Filipino wonton soup, with shrimp and chicken. I’ll make that this year with my family, and have my son help make the dumplings. —Dale Talde, chef at Goosefeather at the Tarrytown House Estate, New York

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  The Easiest Weight Loss Hack You Haven't Tried Yet Numerous studies have connected poor sleep to weight gain. In addition to exercising and eating well, a doctor breaks down why quality sleep is important.Numerous studies have connected poor sleep to weight gain—especially belly fat. For example, research commentary in Environmental Health Perspectives noted that shorter sleep has been correlated with obesity, hypertension, and other metabolic disorders. (Related: 15 Underrated Weight Loss Tips That Actually Work.

We always go see the Nutcracker and make a huge, festive outing out of it. Regardless of the city, we go big. In New York, it of course meant dressing up and going to Lincoln Center, with pre-ordered treats for the kids at intermission, which they think is so classy, and Champagne for me. Last year we saw the Oregon Ballet Theatre perform it in Portland and then went out for an insane Russian meal at Kachka. This time, we’re going to keep the tradition alive, just in new ways. I’ve purchased a few traditional nutcrackers to decorate, I’m trying to get my hands on the 1977 version of the ballet where Baryshnikov and Gelsey Kirkland danced, I’m ordering Champagne, I’m buying smoked fish and caviar to make blinis with all of the fixings (chopped eggs, dill, crème fraiche, red onion…), and of course, we’ll be in velvet and silk, channeling 1890s St. Petersburg. —Rebecca Misner, west coast editor

The holiday season this year comes with a silver lining. As whenever pushed out of our comfort zones, it is an invitation to reflect, reconnect, and even shed what needs shedding—it is a time to send love not only to loved ones, but moreover to yourself. There is no better way to do this than a fire ritual and perhaps even a rite of passage, where you can write down and then burn anything you want to shed, closing a door on the life that has been up to now, while opening up for the beauty ahead. —Anna Bjurstam, creator of the Wellness Programming at Six Senses New York

One of my last big trips before the pandemic was taking my pseudo in-laws on a surprise vacation to Las Vegas. Since we won’t be able to see them this Christmas, I made them a custom Article Uprising hardcover photo book to help remember our trip—and hopefully inspire future travel plans. —A.H.

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This holiday season is a great time to consider fostering a pet from your local shelter. Since we'll all be traveling less, it's the perfect time to take in a cat or dog (or two or three!) in need of a home. As the weather gets colder, shelters are working extra hard to get strays off the frigid streets. I'm fostering three sweet kitties and it's been such a fun and enriching experience. —Vanessa Pham, co-founder of Omsom

Starbucks Just Suspended One of Its Biggest Customer Perks

  Starbucks Just Suspended One of Its Biggest Customer Perks There won't be any more Happy Hour deals at Starbucks in the coming weeks because of the rise in coronavirus cases and potential crowding in stores.Scheduled for Dec. 17 and Jan. 7, the Happy Hour events will no longer take place because of concerns about overcrowding, Starbucks confirmed to Eat This, Not That!. While the deal was originally designed to increase foot traffic during off-peak hours, this holiday season crowds are something to be avoided as they increase the chances of coronavirus infections.

Friendsgiving has been the name of the celebration for me in Paris for many years. This year, the tradition is obviously disrupted—Paris is still in a "light" lockdown, which prohibits gatherings of any kind outside of our own homes. Not one to cook an entire feast on my own, I've outsourced to a restaurant in Paris, Sunday in Soho, that could really use the support. I also ordered a vegan pumpkin pie to try from Izzy's Paris whose co-founder, Allison Kave, is something of a pie expert: She co-owns Butter & Scotch in Brooklyn. Beyond the food, I plan to wear something special (more than pajamas, at the very least!), set a nice table, and put on music to make it feel festive. It won't be the same, but I can still be intentional about seizing the opportunity to celebrate the little things in a year that has been so very trying. —Lindsey Tramuta, Traveler contributor and author of The New Parisienne: The Women & Ideas Shaping Paris

This pandemic has taught us how to truly cherish L.A. and become tourists in our own city. While we usually fly to New York for the holidays, this year we've decided to rent a beach house in Malibu and celebrate by the ocean for a few days. Soaking up the winter sun and building bonfires in the sand will definitely become a new family tradition. —Dominique Olowolafe, CEO and founder of Lightly

I am normally one to evangelize the new, and [experiences] laced with curiosity, discovery, and exploration, but this year I'm advocating for the comfort and familiarity of the tried and true. What are the activities, rituals, food, and drink that are deeply embedded in comfort and joy? How can you bring that into this holiday season in a meaningful way? The tradition that we are upholding this year is to honor slowing down, with craft, and care as the tenets of our Thanksgiving—that is, wherever possible, to make things from scratch. Just the five of us, we will spend Wednesday in the kitchen, doing all the prep and cooking, including setting the table, so on Thanksgiving, we can do our morning hike and then just truly enjoy the meal. —Luis Vargas, founder of Modern Adventure

Abuse Facetime. Make a schedule and block off time with those you know you’ll be hurting for. Maybe it’s: I'm going to do appetizers with this group of people, I'm going to do my main dinner with this group of people. Make cocktails, and do it with a person on the other end. —Jessica Nabongo, founder of Jet Black and blogger at The Catch Me If You Can

Rethink your home

We tend to get pretty granular about our music playlists at Ace. For the holiday season, we’ve settled on a universal crowd pleaser: 1973’s A Motown Christmas compilation. We'll put that album on at home and dance around while I unpack all of the cozy stuff I’d put away over the summer. Ace recently released a new collaboration with Pendleton called the Wavy Blanket—it’s been great for staying warm during socially distanced backyard hangs. —Julie Saunders, head of global marketing, Atelier Ace

My gift to myself this year is to invest in anything that saves me time, and my best recent purchase is the iRobot. We set it to vacuum weekly, so now we only have to hand-vacuum the hardest to reach spots. Truly the gift that keeps giving. —S.W.

a glass mug: Diptyque’s Moonlight Fir is a “gift to the senses,” says Traveler contributor Ashlea Halpern. © Condé Nast Traveler Diptyque’s Moonlight Fir is a “gift to the senses,” says Traveler contributor Ashlea Halpern.

Being snowbound in Minnesota, winter is particularly long and harsh—often six months, with snowfall between 36 and 70 inches. Because I can’t spend my discretionary income on travel this year, I’m investing in purchases big and small to lessen the winter doldrums. This includes splurging on a new 55-inch 4K UHD TV set (all the better for watching National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation in exquisite remastered detail), the world’s coziest wool slippers, an array of holiday candles (Diptyque’s Moonlight Fir is a gift to the senses), the most sumptuous hand cream for combating winter skin, and a whole bunch of Winsor & Newton oil paints—’cause there’s never been a better time than right now to start a new hobby. —A.H.

This year, for the first time, I won’t be heading back to the U.K. to spend Christmas with my family. My holiday plans are going to be very different and much smaller, so I think this is the perfect time to get fancy. Use your best china and glassware, get out your favorite tablecloth, and add candles at varying heights, from elegant tapers to tea lights scattered across the table. Of course, beautiful flowers always make everything seem very special—I like to have multiple smaller vases on the table to both make room for dishes and to not block anyone sitting across the table from each other. —Emily Mathison, creative director of McQueens Flowers New York

These are some weird and funky times, so I take every opportunity for self-love. My favorite indulgence as of late: I invested in what I call a "Rihanna robe"—a thick, plush Turkish cotton bathrobe that I imagine Rihanna rocks around her house in heels and a glass of red wine. We're spending a lot more time at home, so treat yourself to something comforting, yet a little decadent! —K.P.

Most people will be traveling short distances this holiday season—from the bedroom to the living room and back again!—but you can still bring the excitement of travel into your life in small and easy ways. Here’s a fun tip: I’ve started breaking up the large bouquets that sit in the front hall and the dining table and using some of my favorite Paul Arnhold glassware from Brooklyn to make small bouquets on bedside tables. It’s a simple luxury and a beautiful thing to see when you wake up. —Lizzie Tisch, chief curator, of LTD by Lizzie Tisch

This is a moment for creativity, not so much in terms of decor or design, but in improvising in a way that is fun, safer, and hopefully, not banal. Drinks and grateful fellowship will be in the orchard around our wonderful (COVID-inspired) fire pit, which features site-made log seats with beautiful backs, before Thanksgiving dinner in the garage, with the doors open to the fresh air. It will still be festive, with candles everywhere, the tables dressed with my beautiful Portuguese tablecloths, and the chairs sporting deep orange and white chinoiserie fabric from my collection in partnership with Holland & Sherry. [There will be] good food, nice wines and lots of laughter. It’s just the medicine we all need today: the love of family and friends. —Alexandra Champalimaud, founder and president of Champalimaud Design

a room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a table: Emily Mathison, creative director of McQueens Flowers New York, suggests indulging in fresh flowers this holiday season. © Courtesy McQueens Flowers Emily Mathison, creative director of McQueens Flowers New York, suggests indulging in fresh flowers this holiday season.

This might be the year I really go all-out with the holiday decor. I'm rethinking garlands and lights (and where they might possibly hang in my Brooklyn apartment), as well as one creative approach to my tree: Making it travel-themed. I saw the idea making its way around the internet, and was hooked. I'll make or use ornaments that commemorate beloved trips. And once I can travel more widely, I'll prioritize buying a new ornament in each place I go. —C.Q.

Many of my favorite designers throughout Latin America now ship to the U.S. I [plan to] splurge and treat myself by buying plates from the Anfora Cabo collection to make my holiday meals feel extra special, with a bit of wanderlust. —Katalina Mayorga, founder of El Camino Travel and owner of Casa Violeta

Candles. A fire in the fireplace. There’s nothing better than warming up the lighting in a room to make it feel special—hang some string lights, attached to a dimmer. Even twinkle lights have their place during the holiday season. I [also] love using garlands for holiday decorating, because it’s easier than a tree (you can use them on the banister or around the door or on the fireplace), and still get the scent of fresh pine or cedar. Your local garden center usually has strands of 25 - 75 foot newly cut garlands. I have also been known to cut branches of berries from trees in the park, to put in a vase at home. —L.L.

And finally, mix up some cocktails

My family usually does mimosas on Christmas morning, but this year I’m doing my own twist, using blood orange juice instead. It’s modeled after a delicious version I’ve had during brunch at Newport’s Castle Inn. A simple change, but it makes all the difference. —J.P.

a cup of coffee sitting on top of a wooden table: Take cocktail hour seriously, even if it's happening in your own kitchen, says Traveler's Megan Spurrell. © Courtesy Leyenda Take cocktail hour seriously, even if it's happening in your own kitchen, says Traveler's Megan Spurrell.

This holiday season will certainly be a bit different and your celebrations may be much much smaller, but you can still be festive. At Leyenda, we are selling gift baskets full of pre mixed cocktails, my book, Spirits of Latin America, and festive cocktails with awesome glassware. But if you can't get to Leyenda, you can probably get to your favorite bar: a lot of bars in the country are offering cocktails to go, so go support your local establishments. Lastly, if you're just depending on the USPS to deliver your goods, I recommend going online to buy some festive glassware—it's bound to make your whiskey that much better. —Ivy Mix, owner of Brooklyn’s Leyenda and author of Spirits of Latin America

If quarantine has taught me anything, it’s the value of taking cocktail hour seriously, even if it’s happening in your own kitchen. I’m not knocking drinking wine in your sweats, but after nine months at home, the extra effort required to fix yourself a fantastic martini (or two), with a little music and no blaring Netflix, makes all the difference. My greatest holiday tip is to lean into the spirit of that: I’m stocking up on a new set of coupe glasses, fancy Spanish queen olives, a bottle of Dolin vermouth, and the nicest gin I can find in my neighborhood. On the nights before Thanksgiving and Christmas, when I would usually be with having cocktails with family and friends, I’ll at least have the drinks covered. —M.S.

Starbucks Just Suspended One of Its Biggest Customer Perks .
There won't be any more Happy Hour deals at Starbucks in the coming weeks because of the rise in coronavirus cases and potential crowding in stores.Scheduled for Dec. 17 and Jan. 7, the Happy Hour events will no longer take place because of concerns about overcrowding, Starbucks confirmed to Eat This, Not That!. While the deal was originally designed to increase foot traffic during off-peak hours, this holiday season crowds are something to be avoided as they increase the chances of coronavirus infections.

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