•   
  •   
  •   

CanadaSupreme Court asked to reconsider Quebec National Assembly kirpan ban

07:30  06 december  2018
07:30  06 december  2018 Source:   globalnews.ca

It 'may not be the right time' for Quebec to cut immigration levels, Trudeau says

It 'may not be the right time' for Quebec to cut immigration levels, Trudeau says As the Coalition Avenir Québec government prepares to announce a plan to cut newcomers by 20 per cent, the prime minister told reporters in Ottawa he has heard concerns from businesses owners about the province's labour shortage. © Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he's heard from businesses owners who are concerned about Quebec's labour shortage. "I'm not sure this is the best time to reduce the number of people who are coming," he told reporters in Ottawa, speaking in French.

Balpreet Singh, Harminder Kaur argued National Assembly 's ban was legal but non-binding. The Supreme Court of Canada refused on Thursday to hear the appeal of a Sikh man and woman who were prohibited from entering Quebec 's legislature while wearing kirpans .

READ MORE: Quebec ’s top court upholds kirpan ban at the national assembly . Superior Court Justice Pierre Journet rejected their arguments in In 2006, the Supreme Court of Canada sanctioned the wearing of kirpans in schools across the country, recognizing the religious character of the object.

Supreme Court asked to reconsider Quebec National Assembly kirpan ban© Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press In its ruling issued in late October, the high court did not provide a reason for its refusal to hear the case.

A Sikh man and woman who were barred from entering Quebec’s legislature while wearing kirpans have filed a motion for reconsideration after the Supreme Court of Canada refused to hear their appeal.

The move comes after the high court upheld previous decisions from both Quebec Superior Court and Quebec Court of Appeal that found the province’s National Assembly had the right to establish its own rules.

In its ruling issued in late October, the high court did not provide a reason for its refusal to hear the case.

Canada top court rules against Vice journalist protecting source

Canada top court rules against Vice journalist protecting source Canada's top court on Friday effectively ruled against journalists protecting their sources, in a case in which police sought a Vice reporter's communications with an alleged jihadist for use in his prosecution. In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court said society's interest in investigating and prosecuting crimes outweighed the media's need to gather news without government interference in this particular case. But the justices also called for a tweak of the standard test used in weighing the two, saying journalists must be allowed to argue their side when police ask a judge for production orders.

READ MORE: Quebec ’s top court upholds kirpan ban at the national assembly . Superior Court Justice Pierre Journet rejected their arguments in In 2006, the Supreme Court of Canada sanctioned the wearing of kirpans in schools across the country, recognizing the religious character of the object.

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

This Week's Circulars

READ MORE: Supreme Court refuses to hear appeal of Quebec National Assembly kirpan ban

In January 2011, World Sikh Organization of Canada (WSO) members Balpreet Singh and Harminder Kaur did not want to remove their articles of faith as they headed into a legislative hearing to submit a brief.

Singh and Kaur said the legislature's ban on the ceremonial daggers carried by Sikhs was unconstitutional before changing their position to say it was legal but non-binding.

Superior Court Justice Pierre Journet rejected their arguments in 2015, affirming the authority of the legislature to exclude kirpans from its precincts as an assertion of parliamentary privilege. In February 2018, the Quebec Court of Appeal upheld the decision.

Supreme Court double jeopardy case could impact presidential pardon power

Supreme Court double jeopardy case could impact presidential pardon power The Supreme Court on Thursday will consider an exception to the Fifth Amendment's ban on prosecuting an individual twice for the same offense in a case that could also possibly impact President Donald Trump's pardon power as it applies to the Robert Mueller probe. Decades ago, the Supreme Court developed an exception to the Fifth Amendment's double jeopardy clause and it is now being asked to rethink precedent. The so-called "separate sovereigns exception" provides that a person can be tried twice for the same offense if the prosecutions occur in state and federal courts.

Quebec 's top court has upheld the right of the province's National Assembly to prohibit people from entering with a kirpan . Two members of the World Sikh In his decision, Healy referred to a Supreme Court ruling that said a provincial legislature could invoke the privilege to exclude strangers to prevent

Court of Appeal of Quebec upholds the right of the national assembly to bar a person carrying kirpan from entering its premises. “I make no comment whether the assembly ’s exercise of the privilege to exclude the kirpan is a wise decision. I say only that it is a legal exercise of this category of privilege.

WATCH: Westmount teachers protest proposed religious symbol ban

In a statement released on Wednesday, the WSO said two circumstances warrant the high court's reconsideration -- the election of a Coalition Avenir Québec government and a recent court ruling which provided a new framework for parliamentary privilege.

The organization claims the new government has advocated for legislation that will "disproportionately affect religious minorities."

The CAQ government has said it plans to bar certain civil servants in positions of authority -- including teachers, police officers and judges -- from wearing religious symbols at work.

READ MORE: Quebec’s proposed religious symbol ban for public workers fuelled by specific symbols: study

-- With files from Global's Annabelle Olivier and The Canadian Press

Taxes may be a bigger part of online shopping this season.
Shoppers heading online to purchase holiday gifts will find they're being charged sales tax at some websites where they weren't before. The reason: the Supreme Court. A June ruling gave states the go-ahead to require more companies to collect sales tax on online purchases. Now, more than two dozen have moved to take advantage of the ruling, many ahead of the busy holiday shopping season. "Will your shopping bill look any different? ... The answer right now is it depends," said Jason Brewer, a spokesman for the Retail Industry Leaders Association, which represents more than 70 major retailers.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!