Canada: Canada needs a public inquiry into its treatment of veterans - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaCanada needs a public inquiry into its treatment of veterans

18:17  13 march  2019
18:17  13 march  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

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Opinions | Canada needs a public inquiry into Trudeau’s SNC-Lavalin controversy. Now. In democracies, the public trust is sacred. The Veterans Health Administration scandal of 2014 is a reported pattern of negligence in the treatment of United States military veterans .

A tribunal of inquiry is an official review of events or actions ordered by a government body. In many common law countries, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and Canada

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

Canada needs a public inquiry into its treatment of veterans © CBC Lawrence MacAulay speaks to reporters shortly after being sworn in as the new minister for veterans affairs.

Lawrence MacAulay is Canada's new veterans affairs minister. Don't bother learning the name.

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at a fireside chat at the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Mineral Exploration and Temporizing, stonewalling and the easy treatment of friendly witnesses are not helpful. Neither is breaking for two weeks and not being scheduled to return

The inquiry will be led by retired Superior Court justice Jacques Viens and will look into the way A Montreal police investigation into the allegations did not result in any charges against the officers in “We are ready to take the time that is needed and bring the appropriate energy to rebuild the trust that

He is the fifth veterans affairs minister of this Liberal government, and the 18th from the time of the Chretien government. Whereas the defence and finance files, for example, have been steered by just one minister each since the Trudeau Liberals formed government, Veterans Affairs has been practically a revolving door.

Opinions | Canada needs a public inquiry into Trudeau’s SNC-Lavalin controversy. Now.

Opinions | Canada needs a public inquiry into Trudeau’s SNC-Lavalin controversy. Now. In democracies, the public trust is sacred. It’s the foundation on which self-government rests. When perceived breaches of norms occur, especially potentially serious ones, the public interest must be placed above all else and the truth must come out. That’s the burden of being in government — you have more control over public life, but you also have more responsibility for what happens on your watch. Read more: J.J. McCullough: Will Canada learn the wrong lesson from Wilson-Raybould’s testimony? Michael Taube: Wilson-Raybould’s ‘truth’ could seal Trudeau’s fate J.J.

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) is the department within the Government of Canada with responsibility for pensions, benefits and services for war veterans , retired and still-serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), their families, as well as some civilians.

The inquiry on how Quebec treats Indigenous people began in Val-d'Or, Que., Monday with a moving ceremony - and a plea for reconciliation and "social change" from the first Retired Superior Court justice Jacques Viens is presiding over the province's inquiry into the treatment of Indigenous people.

Both Conservative and Liberal governments have had bad relationships with Canada's veterans. The lack of stability on the portfolio is undoubtedly part of the problem. How can anyone make headway on the problems that continue to plague veterans — on pensions, resources and supports — if the minister in charge keeps changing?

Nearly 40,000 veterans waiting for benefits

Nearly 40,000 veterans waiting for benefits OTTAWA - Despite repeated promises to fix the mess, the number of veterans waiting to find out whether they qualify for disability benefits has continued to grow, and there are fears the turmoil will only worsen in the coming weeks. New figures from Veterans Affairs Canada show nearly 40,000 veterans were waiting at the end of November to hear whether their applications for financial assistance would be approved — 11,000 more than the previous year.

“ It ’ s my hope that the public nature of the inquiry and its final report will drive change,” he said. Several veterans ’ groups and individuals have also called for an inquiry , including Vets Canada The former Nova Scotia NDP MP said the inquiry will need to examine Desmond’s transition from military

Veterans Affairs Canada 's mandate is to support the well-being of Veterans and their families, and to promote recognition and remembrance of the achievements and sacrifices of those who served Canada in times of war, military conflict and peace. To achieve this mandate, the Department focuses on its

But there are things that a motivated government can do to fix this.

Metis veterans await apology from PM

Metis veterans await apology from PM OTTAWA - The vice president of the Metis National Council is urging Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay and his staff to ensure an apology is issued soon to Metis veterans from the Second World War. In a letter to the minister, David Chartrand says an apology to veterans who were "disrespected" and "ignored" must happen soon because veterans are nearing the end of their lives. Chartrand says the Manitoba Metis community recently lost another Second World War veteran, who did not receive recognition and justice before his death.

The National Inquiry formal presented its Final Report to government officials at a Closing Ceremony at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau A powerful new public awareness and education campaign was launched on social media platforms by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered

Senior doctors have called for a public inquiry into the use of vaginal mesh surgery amid mounting concerns that a significant proportion of patients “What we continue to see is that evidence supports the use of these devices in the UK for treatment of the distressing conditions of incontinence and

More money and more employees will help. But we are dealing with a public service that is often lethargic, cautious, insensitive and self-serving. Veterans Affairs at the senior levelscan manifest the worst inclinations of that bureaucratic mentality. And it certainly doesn't help that the office is isolated in Charlottetown, where vainglorious initiatives can blossom outside the eye of national watchdogs.

Conservatives question politics behind veterans job placement contract

Conservatives question politics behind veterans job placement contract A relatively unknown Ontario company with no national offices won a $10.3 million contract to help veterans find jobs in the civilian world. An opposition MP (and former veterans minister) is questioning how that happened, and what Agilec has accomplished since it was hired.

The Conservative majority on a parliamentary committee has failed by blocking demands for an inquiry into murdered or missing aboriginal women. The decision by Conservative MPs to block calls for a public inquiry into the deaths and disappearances of hundreds of aboriginal women is an affront to

An inquiry where public meetings are held, where witnesses are called and testify under oath, where independent experts provide services as needed , and — Ben Parfitt is a resource policy analyst with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and has been monitoring fracking activities for many years.

Indeed, Veterans Affairs is the only federal department with its head office located outside Ottawa. That matters. The file will always been considered "second tier" as long as it is out of sight, quite literally, from the decision-makers in Ottawa.

Wettlaufer inquiry will not seek information about more victims

Wettlaufer inquiry will not seek information about more victims The Commissioner for the inquiry looking into the actions at Elizabeth Wettlaufer will not be seeking further information from local police forces. In a ruling released Tuesday, Justice Eileen Gillese said such a move would delay the work of the inquiry. The Ontario Association of Residents' Councils (OARC) had put forward a motion to the inquiry three weeks ago asking the Commissioner to seek the release of information from the Woodstock Police Service, the London Police Service and the Ontario Provincial Police. The information related to disclosures made by the former nurse about harming two other patients.

The inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women is crumbling amid defections, bureaucratic chaos and personal conflict. The Liberal government was delivering on one of its key campaign promises, revealing details of its much-anticipated inquiry into Canada ’s 1,200 cases of missing and

Neither National Defence nor Veterans Affairs Canada have committed to investigating the treatment Mr. Desmond received before and after his release However, a spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia Health Authority said the "quality review" would not be released to the public . "That is a confidential

Big-picture changes

But fundamental change will require more than a change of address. Parliament canbe empowered to think and act big: we did it after World War II, when Canada developed arguably the world's best veteran re-establishment and rehabilitationprogram. However, politicians will need a huge stamp of public approval to affect a sea of change in bureaucratic and political culture.

'The insult': Ottawa's move to honour Métis war vets comes after years of stonewalling

'The insult': Ottawa's move to honour Métis war vets comes after years of stonewalling Nearly 20 years ago, when Veterans Affairs Canada documented the "discrimination and outright fraud" perpetrated against the country's aboriginal war veterans, it deliberately excluded former Métis soldiers. Now it's moving to reverse that injustice - too late for most of the veterans affected by it.

Support a Public Inquiry into the medical evidence in Ontario’s courts and tribunals. And that we can’t afford to pay the highest premiums in Canada for auto insurance we can’t count on. Injured drivers deserve better. We are all just one bad driving decision away from this happening to you or someone

A fulsome public inquiry into Canada's treatment of veterans could provide that approval. An inquiry offers national healing; we would hear tragic stories of family disintegration, lost souls, and suicide, as well as accounts of hope and success. Above all, veterans and their families need to tell the story of how they have been repeatedly stigmatized, marginalized, betrayed, and abandoned by the government system they were willing to die defending.

If this sounds familiar, it is. Canada's Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoplesfrom 1991 to 1996 and later, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, engaged government as well as Canadians nationwide. They chronicled the stories, promises, problems and policy changes in a comprehensive, methodological way, as well as provided blueprints for change going forward.

Though their ordeals are by no means the same, both Indigenous Canadians and veterans share in the experience of suffering at the hands of the governments. Both were placed in vulnerable positions, then promised help and sanctuaryin exchange for immense sacrifices. Instead, they were betrayed.

Canada needs a public inquiry into its treatment of veterans © Marc-André Cossette/CBC Marc-André Cossette/CBC

Veterans need to feel they belong to the nation and communities for which they sacrificed. Yet less than 60 per cent of veteransfeel a strong sense of community belonging.

As with most truth and reconciliation processes, participants can heal by tellingtheir stories. And government might be better compelled to act on their promises if ministers directly engage with veterans in a comprehensive manner.

An independent commission with a broad mandate would also generate a degree of publicity that the odd press conference or special event could not, which is important to giving the portfolio the attention and resources it deserves. And to make sure recommendations are implemented as promised, the government might want to consider installing a permanent and independent veterans' ombudsman — someone who reports to Parliament, not to the particular minister in charge (which is especially important when the minister keeps changing).

It makes smart political sense to do all of this. Veteran disaffection isn't getting any better, and governments follow poor bureaucratic instincts and initiatives at their own peril. By doing things differently, we can meaningfully welcome home our veterans with more than just empty government rhetoric.

Disclosure: The author is currently involved in a defamation lawsuit against former Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O'Regan.

This column is part of CBC's Opinion section. For more information about this section, please read our FAQ.

'The insult': Ottawa's move to honour Métis war vets comes after years of stonewalling.
Nearly 20 years ago, when Veterans Affairs Canada documented the "discrimination and outright fraud" perpetrated against the country's aboriginal war veterans, it deliberately excluded former Métis soldiers. Now it's moving to reverse that injustice - too late for most of the veterans affected by it.

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