Canada: Politicians, religious groups leading Montreal protests against Bill 21 - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaPoliticians, religious groups leading Montreal protests against Bill 21

19:35  14 april  2019
19:35  14 april  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

In Montreal suburb, citizens welcome a secular Quebec

In Montreal suburb, citizens welcome a secular Quebec In Beloeil, a suburban town about 30 kilometres from Montreal, citizens say the Coalition Avenir Québec government's secularism bill is a step in the right direction, but don't agree on how it should be applied.

Politicians in Montreal 's west end at the federal, provincial and municipal level came together Friday to speak "The proposed law discriminates against a number Various groups in Montreal are taking to the streets Sunday to protest Quebec's proposed religious neutrality bill . If adopted, Bill 21 would

Thousands of religious freedom activists have flooded the streets of Montréal to rally against the provincial government’s Bill 21 , which aims to bar public service employees from wearing Hundreds in Montreal protesting against CAQ’s secularism bill at one point chanting “Quebec is not France.

Politicians, religious groups leading Montreal protests against Bill 21© Radio-Canada Protesters hit the streets earlier this month to voice their opposition to Quebec's proposed religious neutrality bill.

Various groups in Montreal are taking to the streets Sunday to protest Quebec's proposed religious neutrality bill.

If adopted, Bill 21 would prevent public employees — including teachers, police officers and judges — from wearing religious symbols at work.

A coalition of mayors, city councillors, school board commissioners and representatives from provincial and federal governments is gathering for a protest organized by the City of Côte Saint-Luc this morning.

Montrealers take to the streets to protest Quebec's proposed religious symbols ban

Montrealers take to the streets to protest Quebec's proposed religious symbols ban Hundreds of protesters gathered in downtown Montreal on Sunday to protest the Quebec government’s Bill 21 — a proposed law that would ban some public employees from wearing symbols of their faith. "Quebec is not France, long live the difference!" protesters chanted in French while clapping their hands and cheering. Protesters gathered next to the Berri-UQAM Metro station before marching down René-Lévesque Boulevard. Sunday's protest is the latest of several events organized since the bill was tabled in late March.

Religious groups say they are being excluded from the public consultations on Bill 21 . Bill 21 would prohibit civil servants in positions of authority from wearing religious symbols in the workplace. However, it has also sparked protests in Montreal , with critics claiming the province is trying to

Hundreds in Montreal protesting against CAQ’s secularism bill at one point chanting “Quebec is not France. Vive la différence!” Many community and political groups have voiced opposition to the bill , saying it will reduce religious freedoms in the province.

It starts at 11:30 a.m. in front of the Bernard Lang Civic Centre on Cavendish Boulevard.

Later in the day, various religious and social justice organizations are gathering for a demonstration organized by the Canadian Muslim Alliance.

The event starts at 2 p.m. at Place Émilie-Gamelin in downtown Montreal, near the Berri-UQAM metro.

"All Quebecers of conscience are encouraged to attend and stand in solidarity with those who will be directly affected by Bill 21, if it's implemented," the Facebook event says.

Representatives from the Catholic and Anglican dioceses, Montreal's board of Rabbis, the United Church of Canada and the World Sikh Organization of Canada will be present.

Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante faces online threats over secularism stance.
Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante spoke out Thursday about threats directed against her over her stance on the province's secularism bill. Plante told reporters Thursday the online attacks have intensified, and she is taking them seriously. "I'm always open for debate, but I will not accept that," Plante said. "This is not the kind of society we want. This is not what we want to encourage." The threats, including some of physical violence, are in messages posted online or sent directly to her social media accounts. "Freedom of speech is important, but we need to realize we're also talking to human beings," Plante said.

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