Canada: Report critical of Ottawa's infrastructure spending in the North - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaReport critical of Ottawa's infrastructure spending in the North

12:31  18 april  2019
12:31  18 april  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

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Critical infrastructure (or critical national infrastructure (CNI) in the UK) is a term used by governments to The timing of spending is critical to federal economic projections and the ensuing effect on federal finances. Earlier this month, the parliamentary budget office said Ottawa ' s planned

Some Northern politicians say the report doesn’t tell the whole story of infrastructure spending in the North . Larry Bagnell, the Liberal MP for the Yukon Schumann says the federal government has been getting money through other programs where Ottawa and the N.W.T. both spend money on projects.

Report critical of Ottawa's infrastructure spending in the North© Alex Brockman/CBC N.W.T., Industry, Tourism and Investment Minister Wally Schumann says he's satisfied with the level of infrastructure spending from the federal government.

A report from the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer questions the value of a key federal government attempt to promote infrastructure spending in Canada, but some Northern politicians say the report doesn't tell the full story.

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There are 16 critical infrastructure sectors whose assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, are considered so vital that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination thereof.

Critical infrastructure protection (CIP) is a concept that relates to the preparedness and response to serious incidents that involve the critical infrastructure of a region or nation. The American Presidential directive PDD-63 of May 1998 set up a national program of " Critical Infrastructure

The report, released April 9, looked at the Investing in Canada Program. It's the Liberals $186-billion spending plan to improve Canada's roads, bridges and water systems over the next decade.

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With Ottawa earmarking billion for infrastructure spendingover the next decade, a coalition of GTA “Governments make decisions about infrastructure investments, but every one of us lives with those “Often in our consultations we had people refer to the gazebos in the north ,” she said — a

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It suggests the program did not actually lead to an increase in infrastructure spending in Canada's North. Instead, after the program began both the Northwest Territories and Nunavut revised their budgets to spend less on infrastructure, the report states.

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The heightened focus on infrastructure spending announced in Tuesday's fiscal update comes at the expense of Ottawa ' s bottom line, as The new money announced Tuesday includes .6-billion in added infrastructure spending in the two years following the With a report from Justin Giovannetti.

In the Yukon, net capital spending went down by $34 million between 2015-16 and 2017-18, the report also found.

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In the week when George Osborne claimed he was championing investment in the north , analysis of spending shows that London’ s population receive far more than anybody else.

The American Society of Civil Engineers’ report shows little improvement in four years in the state of roads, bridges, dams, schools and other essential structures. “The grades in the ASCE report card provide yet another example of what occurs when a nation underinvests in the critical infrastructure

A parallel report for the program's effect on the provinces had similar findings.

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In this first report of our three-part Infrastructure series, we provide an over of the current status and future Going forward, the huge increase in the demand for infrastructure spending will be driven by factors Beyond the presence of an ecosystem, other critical factors for a country to qualify as an

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Using projections, the report suggests that while collective capital spending between the three territories did increase in that time, capital spending was $111 million lower in 2016-17 and 2017-18 than it would have been without the program.

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Critical infrastructure refers to processes, systems, facilities, technologies, networks, assets and services essential to the Enhancing the resilience of critical infrastructure can be achieved through the appropriate combination of security measures Critical Infrastructure - Publications and Reports .

If left unprotected, the critical infrastructure of nations may face an attack at a much larger scale, resulting in mass casualties and degradation of vital systems that are necessary to maintain national security. As a 2011 report by McAfee and CSIS illustrates, in the US, UK and Spain for example

The territorial governments did contribute to joint projects with the federal government — but that "at the same time as they were matching the federal funding they also reduced other spending," explained Yves Giroux, the parliamentary budget officer.

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With Ottawa earmarking billion for infrastructure spending over the next decade, a coalition of GTA civic leaders is urging investment in projects that will help communities prosper over the long haul. “Often in our consultations we had people refer to the gazebos in the north ,” she said — a

If the federal government's goal was getting territories to spend more on infrastructure, he said, there should have been more stringent conditionsand benchmarks for territorial governments around their capital spending.

"The stimulative impact should have been better included in the agreements," he said, adding the federal Infrastructure Department "did not measure the impact pre- and post-Investing in Canada plan ... that's one of the main drawbacks of the program as it is structured."

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Infrastructure Canada did not respond to an email asking if it had changed its practices accordingly.

Instead, a spokesperson for Infrastructure Minister François-Philippe Champagne responded by email, saying the budget office report is an "accounting exercise" that "lags the progress of actual construction activity, often by years, until receipts are paid."

Some Northern politicians say the report doesn't tell the whole story of infrastructure spending in the North.

Larry Bagnell, the Liberal MP for the Yukon, says if his territory is spending less in recent years it could be because it's taking more time to partner with Indigenous governments.

"We want everyone to benefit, First Nations and everyone else," he said. "It takes longer to start out those types of agreements."

Contacted on April 11, Lorne Kusugak, Nunavut's government and community services minister, said he was unavailable for an interview that week due to travel. He has yet to respond to another interview request.

Report critical of Ottawa's infrastructure spending in the North© Mario De Ciccio/Radio-Canada Mario De Ciccio/Radio-Canada

N.W.T. Infrastructure Minister Wally Schumann said he too doesn't believe the report accurately reflects infrastructure spending in the territory.

Schumann says the federal government has been getting money through other programs where Ottawa and the N.W.T. both spend money on projects.

MLA Kieron Testart, who represents the Yellowknife riding of Kam Lake says there could be other reasons for the spending revisions.

In 2018, the N.W.T. government received fewer corporate and personal taxes than it had budgeted for. The territorial government has a self-imposed fiscal responsibility policy that prevents it from taking on certain investments without a cash surplus, he said.

"We've had less revenues to invest in infrastructure — we've had to rebalance our spending priorities," he said.

Rising water could cut off Ottawa water purification plant.
City officials say access to a major water treatment plant in west Ottawa is at risk from the rising Ottawa River, and the military is helping protect it.

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