Canada: Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood - - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaRothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood

15:05  24 april  2019
15:05  24 april  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

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"Lots of sewage systems have been compromised by flooding , and when they're overwhelmed the "The flood water can be heavily contaminated with Rothesay is warning residents who live close to the Kennebecasis River they are at risk of toilet backup because of rising floodwaters and is asking

Rothesay is warning residents who live close to the Kennebecasis River they are at risk of toilet backup because of rising floodwaters and is asking them to use the portable toilets being distributed to "vulnerable neighbourhoods." "Our lagoons have flooded , and our entire sanitary system has been

Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood © CBC Rothesay Mayor Nancy Grant wants assistance from the other two levels of government to build a new wastewater treatment plant for the town.

Rothesay is warning residents who live close to the Kennebecasis River they are at risk of toilet backup because of rising floodwaters and is asking them to use the portable toilets being distributed to "vulnerable neighbourhoods."

"Our lagoons have flooded, and our entire sanitary system has been overwhelmed," Mayor Nancy Grant told CBC News in an email on Tuesday night.

"This is exactly the same situation as we had last year," said Grant.

The Southern New Brunswick mayor renewed her call for financial assistance from the federal and provincial governments for a new wastewater treatment plant.

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Rothesay is warning residents who live close to the Kennebecasis River they are at risk of toilet backup because of rising floodwaters and is asking them to use the portable toilets being distributed to "vulnerable neighbourhoods." "Our lagoons have flooded , and our entire sanitary system has been

Flooded sewage lagoons and pump stations in Rothesay means untreated As Andrew Cromwell reports, record flooding has swamped sewage lagoons and pumping stations. Grant is asking residents who are hooked up to town water to cut back on their usage and the reason is quite simple.

Some of the town's sewage pumping stations have already stopped working, and as floodwaters continue to rise this week, raw sewage will flow directly into the Kennebecasis and St. John River system.

Water levels reached 4.8 metres on Tuesday and are projected to rise to 5.7 metres by Friday, matching last year's historic levels.

Flood stage in the region is 4.2 metres.

Seal toilets on lower levels

Residents in the flood zone, particularly those on Alexander Avenue and Rothesay Park Road, are being advised to seal the toilets on the lower levels of their homes.

All town residents are being encouraged to limit their water use until further notice.

Less flushing and less use of appliances with pressurized drainage, such as dishwashers and washing machines, means less pressure on the system.

What you need to know about flood risks in Ottawa-Gatineau

What you need to know about flood risks in Ottawa-Gatineau Many residents in Ottawa and Gatineau, Que., are spending their Easter weekend preparing for the looming flood risk as the water levels rise on the Ottawa River. Water levels are expected to rise slowly Sunday in the Ottawa-Gatineau region, the Ottawa River Regulation Board Planning Board reported Sunday morning. The agency said it's expecting the river to hit peak levels late Sunday, and will be slightly higher than the water levels reached in April 2017 — just a month before devastating floods hit the area.

Flood levels in the Saint John area peaked at 5.53 metres Friday and are expected to begin to recede on Sunday, but many property owners along the St. John River are still bracing for more damage with rain Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system ' overwhelmed ' by flood .

He said crews built up two roads to minimize the number of affected homes, and volunteers are performing wellness checks in affected areas. Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system ' overwhelmed ' by flood . New Brunswick may take firmer approach on flood relief

"Folks were very co-operative in this regard last year, and we thank them for anticipated co-operation again," said Grant.

Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood © Matthew Bingley/CBC Rothesay's sanitary system, pictured here during last year's flood, is flooded yet again. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)

Rothesay has plans for a new wastewater treatment plant and has had an application in for "several years" for federal and provincial funding, she said.

"Municipalities have a duty to maintain and upgrade infrastructure, but projects such as a new wastewater treatment plant are very expensive, and cannot be done without participation by the other levels of government."

The town did complete a phase of the project in 2016 — new transmission lines in preparation for a new plant, Grant said.

Read more

Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home.
The spring freshet has inundated houses, eroded property and displaced New Brunswickers up and down the St. John River — and now it's created a foul new problem for the residents of Riverside Drive in Fredericton. "Every kind of a thing that's thrown in a flush is here," said resident Richard Yeomans. Sewage seeped from a nearby overflowing manhole after historically high floodwaters spilled into the street and overpowered the city's system. Yeomans watched — and smelled — all kinds of "pollution," from tampons to toilet paper, float across the road and into his yard and basement.

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