Canada: Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

CanadaAdding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home

15:41  03 may  2019
15:41  03 may  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Flood levels in New Brunswick back at last year's damaging levels in capital

Flood levels in New Brunswick back at last year's damaging levels in capital FREDERICTON — The flood levels in Fredericton are back at last year's levels, as the waters of the Saint John River are also causing flooding in the southern parts of the province. Provincial emergency officials are cautioning the water levels of the flood-prone river will continue to rise in southern regions of the province in the days ahead. They say levels in Fredericton and northern regions were continuing to stabilize Tuesday, and they were expected to remain above flood level for the rest of the week. However, Geoffrey Downey, a spokesman for the Department of Public Safety, says levels have reached over 8.

Adding insult to injury , flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man ' s home . Neil Thomas, a water and sewage engineer with the City of Fredericton , said marketing products such as wipes as 'flushable' creates consumer confusion.

Sewage seeped from a nearby overflowing manhole after historically high floodwaters spilled into the street and overpowered the city' s system. She said he was on his way home to Fredericton from a speaking engagement in Ohio. Friedman built a reputation as a leading authority on unidentified flying

Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home © Ed Hunter/CBC Richard Yeomans says sewage spilled onto his road and yard and into his basement.

The spring freshet has inundated houses, eroded property and displaced New Brunswickers up and down the St. John River — and now it's created a foul new problem for the residents of Riverside Drive in Fredericton.

"Every kind of a thing that's thrown in a flush is here," said resident Richard Yeomans.

Sewage seeped from a nearby overflowing manhole after historically high floodwaters spilled into the street and overpowered the city's system. Yeomans watched — and smelled — all kinds of "pollution," from tampons to toilet paper, float across the road and into his yard and basement.

Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood

Rothesay warns residents of toilet backups as sewage system 'overwhelmed' by flood Rothesay is warning residents who live close to the Kennebecasis River they are at risk of toilet backup because of rising floodwaters and is asking them to use the portable toilets being distributed to "vulnerable neighbourhoods." "Our lagoons have flooded, and our entire sanitary system has been overwhelmed," Mayor Nancy Grant told CBC News in an email on Tuesday night. "This is exactly the same situation as we had last year," said Grant. The Southern New Brunswick mayor renewed her call for financial assistance from the federal and provincial governments for a new wastewater treatment plant.

Adding insult to injury , flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man ' s home . The spring freshet has inundated houses, eroded property and displaced New Brunswickers up and down the St. John River — and now it's created a foul new problem for the residents of Riverside Drive in Fredericton .

Adding insult to injury , flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man ' s home . The spring freshet has inundated houses, eroded property and displaced New Brunswickers up and down the St. John River — and now it's created a foul new problem for the residents of Riverside Drive in Fredericton .

"The city sewer system has been pumped directly across my ground and has affected all my neighbourhood here, and people hadn't realized that the city's been doing that," Yeomans said.

"And therefore, there's some people in quite shock … and the city hasn't done anything about it. So, we're quite upset with that."

Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home © Ed Hunter/CBC Some of the debris left on Riverside Drive in Fredericton after an overflowing manhole spilled sewage into the street

But the city said there's nothing it can do when the water reaches a metre over the road. At its peak, the river level in Fredericton hit 8.36 metres, nearly two metres over flood stage.

Manholes overflow because the city's pumps are working flat out trying to move river water and sewer water through the system.

Floodwaters expected to drop in Fredericton, rise downriver.

Floodwaters expected to drop in Fredericton, rise downriver. Flood levels in Fredericton is supposed to start dropping today, potentially getting down to 7.8 metres by Thursday and 7.3 metres by Friday. The Trans-Canada Highway is down to one lane in some westbound sections between Jemseg River Bridge and St. John River Bridge because of high water. Al Giberson, the general manager of MRDC, the company that manages that stretch of road, said they are ready to close an eastbound lane or a whole section of the highway, if needed. He said those decisions will be made later in the day.

Although the man didn’t make contact with the whale, a B.C. marine mammal expert told CTV News that his close encounter is “no laughing matter.” Adding insult to injury , flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man ' s home .

• Flood -stricken communities, including those visited previously by Cameron in the Somerset Levels and Yalding in Kent, have been left without planned defences following government funding cuts, the Guardian can reveal. Adding insult to injury , flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man ' s

"We're pumping as much flow as we can,"  said Dan Harvey, manager of Fredericton's pollution control division.

"Most of the flow that we're moving is … more river water than anything, so it's diluted. So when our systems are underwater, under the river, it's a challenge to pump the river, to move that much flow."

Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home © Ed Hunter/CBC From tampons to toilet paper, 'every kind of a thing that's thrown in a flush is here,' says Richard Yeomans.

And turning off the pumps wouldn't be a good idea, he said.

"If you shut off all the pumps, then wastewater would back up in peoples' homes," Harvey said. "It would be a terrible mess."

2nd year in a row

Yeomans said it's the second straight year he's dealt with the issue.

"I had all of the city officials over there looking at what happened last year, and they said it wouldn't happen again, they'd fix it up, but the exact same thing, only more, happened this year," he said.

St. John River will rise again over the weekend in Fredericton

St. John River will rise again over the weekend in Fredericton Water levels in Fredericton could rise again this weekend, according to the Emergency Measures Organization. The river will recede to 7.2 metres by Saturday and rise again to 7.9 metres Monday in Fredericton, the five-day St. John River forecast says. "It doesn't look like it will be as high as it has been, but anything could happen with the rain," said Geoffrey Downey, spokesperson for Emergency Measures Organization. Rain is forecast for Friday night and Saturday night. Water levels in Maugerville and Grand Lake will continue to rise. In Jemseg, Shefield and Lakeville Corner, the water is expected to stabilize around 6.6 and 6.

Too add insult to injury the kids laugh at the boy who fell down the steps. Get a insult to injury mug for your girlfriend Zora.

Adding Injury to Insult . Screenshots. Videos. Add to list Read the Vrykul Insult to Bjorn Halgurdsson in Baleheim, then lead him back to Lydell' s Ambush and help slay him.

Adding insult to injury, flood brings sea of sewage to Fredericton man's home © Ed Hunter/CBC A Fredericton man is dealing with sewage spilling out onto his flooded street and yard.

On Thursday, there was still about four feet of contaminated water in his basement, but he's also worried about the saturated ground.

"And you look over next door and you see little kids playing out in it and that's not very healthy for them," Yeomans said.

In a statement, Dr. Jennifer Russell, chief medical officer of health, said children should not be allowed to play in floodwater areas until the areas have been cleaned up or for about a week after the floodwater has cleared completely.

Sunlight and soil help destroy harmful bacteria and any excess risk to health should disappear, she said.

To that point, Yeomans said his basement doesn't get much sunlight.

Read more

Potential health hazards linked to Quebec floodwaters and how to stay safe.
During flooding, experts say, it's difficult to know where the water came from and what it came in contact with. Here's how to protect yourself.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!