•   
  •   
  •   

CanadaIn historic first, Supreme Court of Canada to hold hearings outside Ottawa

06:40  14 may  2019
06:40  14 may  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Ottawa's planned fighter competition incompatible with F-35 obligations: U.S.

Ottawa's planned fighter competition incompatible with F-35 obligations: U.S. OTTAWA — U.S. officials have warned the Trudeau government that its plan to hold an open competition to replace its aging CF-18s is incompatible with Canada's obligations as a member of the F-35 stealth-fighter program. The warnings are in two letters sent to the government last year that were obtained by defence analyst Richard Shimooka and released in a report published by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute think-tank. The letters specifically take issue with the government's plan to have each fighter-jet maker commit to re-investing in Canada if its aircraft wins the upcoming competition aimed at buying 88 new planes for $19 billion.

In historic first, Supreme Court of Canada to hold hearings outside Ottawa Chief Justice Richard Wagner

For the first time in its history, the Supreme Court is taking its hearings on the road to give more Canadians a close-up view of the top court at work.

The justices will travel to Winnipeg in late September to hear two appeals and hold meetings with various individuals and groups in Manitoba.

"It's important for us to be accessible to all Canadians, because the Supreme Court is your court," said Chief Justice Richard Wagner in a video statement. "The decisions we make affect your life and that of your family and community."

This will be the first time the Supreme Court of Canada hears a case outside of Ottawa, and it follows on similar moves by high courts in the U.K., Australia and France.

Canada's asylum system unable to respond to spikes in claims, AG finds

Canada's asylum system unable to respond to spikes in claims, AG finds OTTAWA — Canada's refugee system is plagued with a backlog of asylum claims that is worse now than it has ever been, caused in part by systemic inefficiencies, according to findings from acting auditor general Sylvain Ricard. As part of five audits of government activities released today, Ricard's office looked at how quickly and efficiently the three government agencies involved in reviewing and processing refugee claims are doing their work. The audit found Canada's refugee system is not able to respond quickly to surges in asylum claims — which has led to a two-year backlog of claims.

Wagner said the Supreme Court already has taken steps to give Canadians a closer look at its operations — by televising and webcasting hearings and by keeping Canadians up to date on its activities through Twitter and Facebook.

Holding hearings in another part of the country will allow more Canadians to see the justices at work, Wagner said.

In Winnipeg on Sept. 25, the Supreme Court will hear a case that deals with court delays in a child sexual abuse trial. The following day, it will hear a case about minority language educational rights stemming from an appeal in British Columbia.

Wagner was sworn in as chief justice Dec. 18, 2017, succeeding Beverley McLachlin.

During a news conference after his appointment, Wagner expressed his belief that the court must engage more with the public in order to maintain confidence in the justice system.

Huawei CFO Meng set to appear in Canada court

Huawei CFO Meng set to appear in Canada court Huawei CFO Meng set to appear in Canada court

"I think that the Supreme Court and chief justice, in particular, have an obligation to speak to the people and to make sure that the people of Canada keep their faith in the judicial system. And that could be made by our presence, by our speeches," he said at the time.

While in Winnipeg, the court will hold a large public event and meet with various groups, including Indigenous communities, the francophone community, the legal community and students.

Manitoba Court of Appeal Chief Justice Richard Chartier said the local legal community is "delighted" to host the hearings.

"This will be a great opportunity for Manitobans to learn more about our justice system, and for the justices of the Supreme Court to meet Manitobans and learn more about our great province," he said in a statement.

Read more

Decision expected today in case of child bride from Bountiful, B.C..
CRANBROOK, B.C. — The B.C. Supreme Court is expected to issue a decision today in the case of a former leader in a fundamentalist Christian sect that practises polygamy in Bountiful, B.C. James Oler is accused of removing an underage girl from Canada to marry a member of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which operates in British Columbia and the United States. He was acquitted in 2017 by a judge who was not convinced Oler did anything within Canada's borders to arrange the girl's transfer to the U.S., but the B.C. Court of Appeal agreed with the Crown that proof of wrongdoing in Canada was not necessary and ordered a new trial.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!