Canada: Nova Scotia human rights board awards over $600,000 for racist discrimination - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaNova Scotia human rights board awards over $600,000 for racist discrimination

17:31  15 may  2019
17:31  15 may  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Human Rights in Nova Scotia . The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission is committed to actively engaging and working with all Nova Scotians and our diverse communities to address issues of discrimination by effectively advancing equity and dignity, fostering positive and respectful

The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission was established in 1967.[38]. Nova Scotia has also produced some significant songwriters such as Grammy Award winning Gordie Sampson. Nova Scotia has two national parks, Kejimkujik and Cape Breton Highlands, and many other protected areas.

Nova Scotia human rights board awards over $600,000 for racist discrimination © THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Lee Brown A Halifax bus on Mar. 08, 2018.

HALIFAX — A human rights board has ordered the City of Halifax to pay almost $600,000 in damages after a former bus mechanic suffered racist discrimination.

Last year, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission board of inquiry in the case found widespread racial discrimination and a poisoned work environment at Halifax Transit's garage.

The mechanic filed the complaint with the rights commission over 12 years ago, in July 2006, saying the worker suffered from trauma due to the hostile workplace.

The worker's lawyer had asked for the maximum amount awarded under Canadian law for general damages.

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The Nova Scotia Human Rights Act prohibits actions that discriminate against people based on a protected characteristic in combination with a In addition to protection from discrimination , the Act also prohibits harassment based on any of these characteristics, and prohibits sexual harassment in

The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) was established in Nova Scotia , Canada in 1967 to administer the Nova Scotia Human Rights Act. The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission is the first commission in Canada to engage a restorative dispute resolution process.

Board inquiry chair Lynn Evans awarded over $105,000 in general damages to the mechanic and $33,015 to his wife, and also set penalties of $21,675 for the cost of future care for the mechanic and $433,077 for past and future lost income

The complainant, whose name is protected from publication, is white, but his wife is African Nova Scotian, and black and Indigenous co-workers also suffered under the actions of a bus mechanic who no longer works at the garage.

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