•   
  •   
  •   

CanadaThis Toronto doctor helps people get more money to improve their health

16:05  19 may  2019
16:05  19 may  2019 Source:   globalnews.ca

Vaccine hesitancy 'very concerning and upsetting,' says doctor heading new U of T centre

Vaccine hesitancy 'very concerning and upsetting,' says doctor heading new U of T centre As vaccine hesitancy poses a growing threat to public health, the University of Toronto is opening a new centre aimed at challenging misinformation about vaccines and ensuring Canada is ready for the next outbreak of a highly infectious disease. The Centre for Vaccine Preventable Diseases at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health will be home to scientists across multiple disciplines who will study disease and vaccination patterns, as well as how best to combat the spread of misinformation about vaccines. Vaccine hesitancy "is a problem everywhere," the centre's director, Dr.

For Dr . Gary Bloch's patients, having more money has a bigger effect on their health than just getting a prescription. Bloch and his team at the Academic Family Health Team at downtown Toronto ’s St. Michael’s Hospital helped the woman apply for the disability benefits she was entitled to — just one of

Get the help of a psychologist to explore why he's letting his grades slip and how to manage his stressors. Their dialogue is shown below. The last time the two met, there was a misunderstanding between them. medical doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.

This Toronto doctor helps people get more money to improve their health © THE CANADIAN PRESS/Doug Ives A man sleeps on a vent outside Toronto General Hospital in Toronto on Thursday April 5, 2018.

A few years ago, a woman came in to see Dr. Gary Bloch at his family medicine clinic in Toronto.

She had “just terribly, terribly controlled diabetes,” he said. “Her blood sugar was literally through the roof, for many reasons.

“She ate terribly. But she ate terribly because she couldn’t afford food. She took her medication sporadically, but she took her medication sporadically because there were a lot of pressures in her life. She often couldn’t afford to get medication so just didn’t take them.”

9 influential money lessons from mom

9 influential money lessons from mom As Mother's Day nears, we consider some of the wise ways our moms taught us to save and spend money.

Start studying Solutions Unut 5A jobs. Learn vocabulary, terms and more with flashcards, games and other A dentist. helps people to look after their teeth. a programmer. writes computer software. trains people or team to make them better at a sport. receptionist. helps peolpe who arrive at a hotel

Health and the Body. Keeping fit and staying healthy have, not surprisingly, become a growth Quite apart from the amount of money spent each year on doctors ’ prescriptions and approved medical We are more concerned than ever, it seems, about the water we drink and the air we breathe, and It also lowers blood pressure and helps diabetics by improving glucose tolerance and reducing insulin

The woman was starting to develop complications of diabetes — numbness in her feet, kidney problems, vision problems, Bloch said.

His treatment? Helping her improve her income.

Bloch and his team at the Academic Family Health Team at downtown Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital helped the woman apply for the disability benefits she was entitled to — just one of the services they provide. They also help patients do their taxes so that they get benefits like the Canada Child Benefit, and apply for programs designed to help low-income individuals, along with other social supports.

The clinic isn’t giving away money — these are government benefits that these patients qualify for – but helping people do the paperwork can make a big difference in their lives, and their health, Bloch said.

Toronto Public Health investigating two confirmed measles cases with possible exposure at Pearson Airport

Toronto Public Health investigating two confirmed measles cases with possible exposure at Pearson Airport Toronto Public Health says it is investigating two confirmed travel-related cases of measles in adults with possible exposure in the GTA earlier this month. In both cases, an infected person was travelling between Toronto’s Pearson International Airport and London Heathrow Airport on an Air Canada flight, the health agency said in a news release. It says it is following up people known to have come into contact with the highly contagious virus and is warning that the public may have been exposed on the following dates: May 5: Remley’s Restaurant, at 4830 Sheppard Ave. E. between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Pearson International Airport, Terminal 1, between 6 p.m.

Physical activity helps people lose weight and improves their cardiovascular health . In addition, the government can impose extra taxes on junk foods and No matter how hard the government tries, if someone does not want to be healthy , the government can offer little help . In many countries obesity

nouns for health . - health benefits - health risks - health problems - health care - health education - health system. Health authorities need to increase public awareness of these issues, but we also need to be realistic. Fast food is popular not only because it is convenient but also because it is tasty.

READ MORE: Is poor health a problem you can fix by yourself? Not when you don’t have money

In this case, getting disability support meant that the woman had a steady source of income, he said, and was able to get some of her medications covered. “The change in her diabetes status was actually quite dramatic,” Bloch said. “Literally, her sugars came down by more than half. You talk to anyone who deals with diabetes and that is very, very unusual.”

Getting just a few hundred dollars extra per month leads to dramatic changes in his patients’ health, he said.

“Worlds open up. I know that sounds dramatic but it is absolutely what I see over and over again.

“Someone like this, they’re suddenly able to go rent a place, they’re able to buy food, they’re able to attend appointments with me and they’re able to often go to counselling.” All this improves their health, he said, allowing them to take medications regularly, eat better and take care of themselves.

Opinion: Are Warriors better without Kevin Durant? It's more complicated than that

Opinion: Are Warriors better without Kevin Durant? It's more complicated than that With Durant sidelined for Game 1 of the Western Conference finals, Steph Curry and the Warriors looked more like champions than they have all season. © Provided by USA Today Sports Media Group LLC Stephen Curry scored a game-high 36 points in Game 1. They’ve done it out of necessity. Shorn of the luxury of Durant’s ability to marshal offensive opportunities at will, the Warriors have simply gone back to how things were done before he came along. Speedy ball-movement, seeking an open man. Vigorous intensity.

Desert animals have also developed many characteristics that help them to survive in arid environment. to better distribute their body heat and stay cool. But how has ' Doctor Who' managed to survive for this long? What sets it apart from other amazing shows that are now over?

People nowadays are more health -conscious than they used to be. They understand that good health is above wealth. To be healthy we should avoid different bad habits that can affect our health . And a lot of people try to improve their fitness. There are a lot of ways to lose weight and avoid gaining it.

From tent to apartment

Visiting Bloch’s clinic made a difference in Brian’s life. Brian, who lives in Toronto and didn’t want his last name shared for privacy reasons, used to be homeless.

He ran away from home at 14 and spent years moving around Canada, including 23 years living in a tent in B.C. and the Greater Toronto Area.

When he needed medical help, he visited the emergency room. One time, he said, “I got a ride out of Toronto as far as Highway 9 and 400, and I was on the on-ramp hitchhiking north back to B.C. and I had my third heart attack right there on the ramp.”

READ MORE: Low-income Canadians face longer health care wait times

By the time he got out of hospital in Newmarket, he said, someone had slashed up his tent. He moved again, setting up at times near the Metro Toronto Zoo or the Ontario Science Centre as his chronic obstructive pulmonary disease began to give him trouble again. So he was back in the emergency room, this time in Scarborough.

Eventually, through referrals from various homeless programs, he got in touch with Bloch.

The clinic helped him get a prescription for his medications through a pharmacy, get funding for his special medical diet, get disability payments, counselling, and housing support. He also receives Old Age Security payments and the Guaranteed Income Supplement.

Alleged ‘heavyweight’ gangster could be poster child for B.C.’s public inquiry into money laundering

Alleged ‘heavyweight’ gangster could be poster child for B.C.’s public inquiry into money laundering Allegations against Kwok Chung Tam could illustrate how the Vancouver-area real estate market may have been exploited by Chinese organized crime. In 2018, a Global News investigation revealed that a secret police study linked more than $1 billion worth of high-end Vancouver-area property transactions in 2016 to suspected money laundering and organized crime, while an independent review released last week by B.C.'s government estimated $5 billion was laundered through the province's real estate last year alone.

This Toronto doctor helps people get more money to improve their health © Provided by Corus Media Holdings, Inc.

Now in his 60s, Brian no longer lives in a tent.

“I’m styling here, I’m sitting on top of the world now,” he says of his one-bedroom apartment. He takes occasional work driving a bulldozer and has even reconnected with the family he left behind at 14.

WATCH: How a community can deal with children and youth to help break the cycle of poverty

His health has improved, too.

“I haven’t had any trouble with my heart for a long time now. As long as I keep doing my pills and everything, it’s good.”

Although he still gets short of breath at times, his COPD is better, he said, and he no longer has angina pains.

Poverty and health

Income is very closely tied to health, according to Dennis Raphael, professor at York University’s School of Health Policy and Management. Low income is associated with a higher risk of “everything except prostate cancer and breast cancer,” he said.

Many cancers, arthritis, diabetes, kidney disease, respiratory disease, stroke and more are all associated with income, he said. So is life expectancy — according to a Statistics Canada analysis of data from 2005-06, men in the richest Canadian neighbourhoods live almost five years longer than those in the poorest.

Being poor affects your concrete living conditions, things like food and shelter, Raphael said. “We could use some examples of crowding. We could use examples of mould, we could use examples of poor diet.

According to a Sleep Doctor, This Is How Many Hours You Need a Night to Lose Weight

According to a Sleep Doctor, This Is How Many Hours You Need a Night to Lose Weight Sleep is often overlooked in the weight-loss equation, but it's integral to keep the weight off for good. To better understand the role sleep plays when it comes to weight loss and how much you should strive to get each night, POPSUGAR spoke to Rizwana Sultana, MD, assistant professor of pulmonary critical care and sleep medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch. Why Sleep Is Important "More than a third of American adults are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2016.

“Basically, when you are living under conditions of material deprivation, it does things to your body that make you more susceptible to disease.”

READ MORE: Food banks, bills and constant stress - What living in poverty really means in Canada

Scrounging for money is also stressful, he said, and chronic stress, day after day, takes a toll on your health. And some people deal with stress in a negative way — drinking, smoking, using drugs, or eating bad food, he said.

“I often say there is no better-studied epidemiological link out there right now than between poverty and poor health,” Bloch said. “I’m at the point where I wonder why people keep even looking at it because I think it is that well-proven.”

Many of his patients aren’t aware of the benefits they’re entitled to, or why they should file taxes even if they know they won’t owe any money, he said. “People basically face multiple levels of barriers, whether it’s health barriers, social barriers, educational barriers, literacy barriers. Just basic knowledge barriers of where to go.”

READ MORE: Experiment finds evidence living in poor neighbourhood can hurt overall health

Many Canadians aren't getting the money they're entitled to, even when they do claim it. A 2014 report found that the government was sitting on hundreds of millions of dollars of uncashed cheques for tax benefits and refunds.

The Canada Revenue Agency is "promoting and raising awareness" of benefits and credits that can only be obtained through filing taxes, the agency wrote in a statement. "In 2017‑18, the CRA sent letters to 300,000 lower-income Canadians who had not filed a return, informing them they might be eligible for benefits and credits which they are not receiving and encouraging them to file their returns," the CRA wrote. Only 37,934 returns were filed as a result, they wrote, though these accounted for millions of dollars.

“I believe that a lot of people that are living on the street don’t know how to access this stuff because they’re in another world,” Brian said.

“The biggest problem with being homeless is they got no money,” he said.

Now that he has a bit, with support from Dr. Gary Bloch and Celia, a social worker at the clinic, “My life is completely changed around now.”

“I have family, (…) my cupboards are full. My fridge is full. You know, I don’t want for nothing. I have money for transit. It’s been a complete turnaround and I really put all of that back to St. Mike’s at 80 Bond St. and to Gary and Celia.

“If it wasn’t for them, who knows where I would have been right now? I might be dead, OK? And that’s no lie.”

Read more

Toronto Island residents working to fend off flooding.
Commodore Genia Vanderkruk has traded her yacht club blue and whites for yellow rain gear and is surveying the slate grey encroaching waters of Toronto’s inner harbour. 

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!