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CanadaOur casual racism causes Indigenous suffering: Neil Macdonald

16:04  04 june  2019
16:04  04 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Some of the MMIWG inquiry's farthest-reaching recommendations

Some of the MMIWG inquiry's farthest-reaching recommendations GATINEAU, Que. — The final report of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls includes more than 200 "calls for justice." A selection of some of the farthest-reaching ones: 1. Establish a national Indigenous and human-rights ombudsperson and a national Indigenous and human-rights tribunal 2. Create a national action plan to ensure equitable access to employment, housing, education, safety, and health care 3. Provide long-term funding for education programs and awareness campaigns related to violence prevention and combating lateral violence — that is, violence committed by one Indigenous person against another 4.

What Causes Our Suffering . According to Buddhism, suffering arises from attachment to desires. Casual racism . In a sense, it was understandable: Trump is a travelling freak show, and bound to say or do something laughably stupid wherever he goes Neil Macdonald is an opinion columnist for CBC

Casual racism . In a sense, it was understandable: Trump is a travelling freak show, and bound to say or do something laughably stupid wherever he But of course Monday's ceremony was not about vital young hockey players whose deaths call up dark insecurities about the fragilities of our own children

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering: Neil Macdonald© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward Anni Philips gives her testimony during the National Inquiry of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Richmond, B.C., Wednesday, April, 4, 2018.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

As Judge Marion Buller stood before her audience Monday morning, struggling to adequately convey in her few allotted minutes the crushing load of sadness she and her fellow commissioners had collected in the past few years, and her fear that Canadians won't listen, the country's two main cable news channels abruptly decided to make her point.

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM GATINEAU, Que. — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stopped short of calling the disappearances and deaths of Indigenous women and girls in Canada a genocide on Monday — despite being called upon to do so — when he spoke after accepting the report of the national public inquiry he called on the issue. 

That's the way it is now. I'm going to give you another shot before we go in to keep you going." Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Quibbling over the definition of genocide does nothing but help obscure the long history of vicious racism and undeniable suffering of Indigenous

Read this essay on Systemic Racism . Come browse our large digital warehouse of free sample essays. Quibbling over the definition of genocide does nothing but help obscure the long history of vicious racism and undeniable suffering of Indigenous people in this country.

In the lower quadrant of the country's TV screens, up popped live video of U.S. President Donald Trump, of all people, visiting Westminster Abbey, of all places.

Seriously. Someone thought it was a good idea, during a solemn ceremony meant to honour and remember the thousands of Indigenous women raped, murdered, sold, brutalized, kidnapped and otherwise treated like chattel, to provide the audience with the distraction of a foreign leader who makes sniggering allusions to "Pocahontas," and belittling references to the tragic history of the Trail of Tears, visiting a symbol of the Western religion that was such an enthusiastic partner in the merciless, murderous subjugation of the doomed people who were living in North America when European explorers "discovered" it.

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM GATINEAU, Que. — Geraldine Gauthier clutched a picture of her sister, Lynn, as she heard from the federally funded commission tasked with documenting the causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls. Lynn was murdered 19 years ago. For Gauthier, the day was emotional and brought back many memories. But it was also filled with a touch of optimism now that 231 recommendations from the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls have been put on paper. "They are going to hear what we have to say, first of all," she said. "It is a beginning and I hope it does bring change.

Neil Macdonald is an opinion columnist for CBC News, based in Ottawa. Prior to that he was the CBC's Washington correspondent for 12 years, and before that he spent five years reporting from the Middle East. Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald .

Quibbling over the definition of genocide does nothing but help obscure the long history of vicious racism and undeniable suffering of Indigenous people in this country. Neil Macdonald again hits the nail on the head. The ignorance, casual racism , and lack of respect and understanding regarding

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering: Neil Macdonald© Chantelle Bellrichard/CBC Chief Commissioner Marion Buller addresses the crowd at the opening ceremony of the MMIWG inquiry.

Just in case all this sobbing and feathers and drums and costumes are boring you, dear viewer, here's the personification of white nationalist power, touring one of white empire's principal tools of colonization.

Casual racism

In a sense, it was understandable: Trump is a travelling freak show, and bound to say or do something laughably stupid wherever he goes, so, because he's president, he's news. But it was also precisely the sort of casual racism Bullard was trying to talk about. Ask yourself this: If the main event was, say, the funeral of the teenage hockey players from Humboldt, Sask., would anyone even think of profaning the occasion by intercutting footage of the vulgar boor in the White House strolling around a big church overseas?

But of course Monday's ceremony was not about vital young hockey players whose deaths call up dark insecurities about the fragilities of our own children, and the daily dangers from which we simply cannot protect them. It was about the suffering of a marginal community of "others," people whose culture and language are incomprehensible to most of us, and whose existence is mostly invisible.

Accused of genocide, founder of Halifax faces further public scrutiny

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Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald . Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women issues final report with sweeping calls for change. Former Harper-era minister doubles down on calling MMIWG inquiry report 'propagandist'.

One of Malaysia's last Indigenous , nomadic communities has been hit with a wave of illness and deaths that nobody has been able to explain — but a doctor who recently visited the tribe says neglect and overdevelopment are to Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald .

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering: Neil Macdonald© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

In any case, I will acknowledge some white guilt. I am deeply sympathetic to Indigenous treatment at the hands of white society. I was in Oka for the whole summer of that crisis, watching the Mohawks of Kanesatake threatened, loathed and brutalized by racist police who were acting as armed enforcers for a white city council that wanted to expand its golf course onto sacred Indian land, and I remember thinking that if I was a young Mohawk man, I'd be on the barricade with a rifle, too.

I've spent time up north reporting on suicide rates and the unspeakable habit of "huffing" – inhaling gasoline fumes until the mind unhinges – that afflicts remote Indigenous communities. The depth of hopelessness there was suffocating, especially in the perpetual darkness of winter.

I am delighted to see the government spending more money to improve Indigenous life, and I would be happy to see even more spent. I recognize the ruthless violence inflicted on them by my ancestors, but I feel no personal responsibility for that. And when yet another story about Indigenous culture appears, almost by rote, on television or media websites — unless it's a news report about a manifest injustice, say, annual flooding or undrinkable water or mouldy, uninhabitable dwellings, or police brutality, stories like the ones about the cops in Val D'Or who would abuse or harass Indigenous women, then drop them somewhere out of town, even in winter — I just tune out.

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country's complicity in genocide: Robyn Urback

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country's complicity in genocide: Robyn Urback If Trudeau is serious when he says "this was genocide," agreeing with the conclusion of the MMIWG report, legal proceedings will be forthcoming. If that doesn't happen, which is more likely, Trudeau sends a message about how serious he is when he calls the treatment of Indigenous people "genocide."

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald . While McMahon says a lot of people are feeling an "unfathomable amount of pain" caused by the re-traumatization of victims, the opportunity for Canadians to still listen to Indigenous women and girls remains.

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald . RCMP will 'give careful consideration' to MMIWG recommendations, says commissioner. Families, Indigenous leaders hope MMIWG inquiry's recommendations won't 'sit on a shelf'.

Like a lot of people, I suspect. There is a reason that the number of unique pageviews falls so steeply when an online article or column is about Indigenous issues. It is no doubt that sort of benign indifference that prompted the MMIWG commissioners to deploy the incendiary accusation of genocide against Canadian society.

Judge Buller, with her serene smile, was explicit at the ceremony: "The significant, persistent and deliberate pattern of systemic racial and gendered human and indigenous rights violations and abuses perpetuated historically and maintained today by the Canadian state … is the cause of the disappearances, murders, and violence experienced by Indigenous women … and this is genocide."

I'm not going to argue with that, as some foolish people like former Conservative minister Bernard Valcourt have already loudly done. Quibbling over the definition of genocide does nothing but help obscure the long history of vicious racism and undeniable suffering of Indigenous people in this country. It's bad enough whatever you want to call it.

MMIWG recommendations

As for the commission's long list of recommendations, which Judge Buller calls legal imperatives and says the government must absolutely implement in their entirety, I can confidently say most won't find their way into law. Reform moves glacially, especially reform of governance. And certain of the recommendations are unworkable.

Feds have failed to explain 'inaction' in Grassy Narrows: UN rapporteur

Feds have failed to explain 'inaction' in Grassy Narrows: UN rapporteur OTTAWA — The case of a northern Ontario First Nation plagued by mercury contamination is "emblematic" of an overall pattern of inaction in the face of grave risks to the health of Indigenous Peoples, a United Nations human-rights expert said Thursday — the same day the community's chief came to Ottawa to urge action. Baskut Tuncak, the UN's special rapporteur on human rights and hazardous substances and wastes, said he has heard during a

Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Opinion | CBC News. Quibbling over the definition of genocide does nothing but help obscure the long history of vicious racism and undeniable suffering of Indigenous people in this country.

"We have women in our own community who have been trafficked and not enough resources to support them through the legal system," she explained, adding the inquiry has also shown issues with the court system and the way it deals Our casual racism causes Indigenous suffering : Neil Macdonald .

Punishing abusers of Indigenous women more severely, for example, could create an unwanted paradox: because the abuser (as the MMIWG report itself notes) is often an Indigenous man, the system could wind up imposing a more severe punishment on him than on a white man who has abused a white woman. Which would be lunacy.

However. Come hell, high water, or recession, budgets for Indigenous people should be increased, never cut. They have absolute rights in law and by treaty. Rights, not granted privileges. We owe them.

Affirmative action programs, to the extent by which Indigenous people can be enticed into participating in Canadian society and economy, must continue.

And with all due respect to Buller and her commission, they did not solve any missing or murdered cases (they never intended to try). My guess is the families who have complained so bitterly about the commission's work simply want to know what happened to their sisters, daughters and mothers.

The prime minister could and should call in the RCMP commissioner, offer her a hundred million dollars or so to open an Indigenous cold case unit, and tell her to get cracking on results, or expect to be replaced.

That would be actual action, as opposed to the slacktivism of proclaiming which tribe's unsurrendered (and never to be returned) land the speaker is standing on. Conscience demands it.

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Genocide against Indigenous women and girls 'obvious,' says chief commissioner.
VANCOUVER — The chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls says the final report has started difficult conversations, but Canada must know the truth before it can achieve reconciliation. Marion Buller made the remarks in a speech in Vancouver at a conference on the topic held by the University of British Columbia in collaboration with Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The inquiry's

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