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CanadaThe political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country's complicity in genocide: Robyn Urback

16:35  06 june  2019
16:35  06 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

National inquiry calls murders and disappearances of Indigenous women a 'Canadian genocide'

National inquiry calls murders and disappearances of Indigenous women a 'Canadian genocide' The thousands of Indigenous women and girls who were murdered or disappeared across the country in recent decades are victims of a “Canadian genocide,” says the final report of the national inquiry created to probe the ongoing tragedy. The inquiry's final report, obtained by CBC News and verified by sources, concludes that a genocide driven by the disproportionate level of violence faced by Indigenous women and girls occurred in Canada through "state actions and inactions rooted in colonialism and colonial ideologies.

Either way, if the prime minister accepts that genocide was or is happening in Canada, shouldn't he say Countries that have ratified the genocide convention, which include Canada, are obliged to both prevent This is the quagmire in which the prime minister now finds himself. Investigating Canada.

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country ' s complicity in genocide : Robyn Urback . If Trudeau is serious when he says "this was genocide ," agreeing with the conclusion of the MMIWG report, legal proceedings will be forthcoming. If that doesn't happen, which is more

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country's complicity in genocide: Robyn Urback© Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is serious when he says he agrees with the conclusion of the report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls — that 'this was genocide' — legal proceedings should be forthcoming.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

The report produced by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) is a tome of failures.

Of stomach-churning analysis of child welfare agencies tearing children away from families (which goes well beyond the Sixties Scoop, with Indigenous children still, on average, 12 times as likely to be taken from their home as non-Indigenous children).

All Canadians have a role to play in ending MMIW 'genocide,' report says

All Canadians have a role to play in ending MMIW 'genocide,' report says GATINEAU, Que. — The national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women wants health service providers across Canada to develop programs that could help young people recognize the signs of being targeted for exploitation. The inquiry's final report, released publicly this morning with more than 200 recommendations to the federal government, calls violence against First Nations, Metis and Inuit women and girls a form of "genocide" and a

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country ' s complicity in genocide : Robyn Urback . In his view, Akhavan said discussions over the use of the term genocide are a distraction from the steps that need to be taken to address the causes of violence against Indigenous

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the political leader of the United Kingdom and the Head of Her Majesty' s Government. Number Ten Downing Street is the official residence of the Prime Minister ; the incumbent also has use of a country home, Chequers.

Of multigenerational trauma that is allowed to fester in isolation, where a lack of mental and physical health services has contributed to a five-year-shorter lifespan, on average, for Indigenous Canadians than non-Indigenous Canadians.

And of course, of the failure to protect women and girls (as well as men and boys), and our collective inertia and relative unconcern over the suffering endured in these communities.

Elsewhere on this site, Ontario-based lawyer Naomi Sayers explores the concept of exploitation as it relates to the MMIWG report, arguing that properly defining and understanding it is central to the struggle of finding justice for victims and survivors. She suggests the word "exploitation" ought to garner at least as much attention as the word "genocide" — of which Canada, according to the report's conclusion, is guilty, both in past and present.

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM

Killing, violence toward Indigenous women, girls 'not a relic of our past': PM GATINEAU, Que. — Geraldine Gauthier clutched a picture of her sister, Lynn, as she heard from the federally funded commission tasked with documenting the causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls. Lynn was murdered 19 years ago. For Gauthier, the day was emotional and brought back many memories. But it was also filled with a touch of optimism now that 231 recommendations from the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls have been put on paper. "They are going to hear what we have to say, first of all," she said. "It is a beginning and I hope it does bring change.

The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of the Government of the United Kingdom, and chair of the British Cabinet. There is no specific date for when the office of prime minister first

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the political leader of The Prime Minister is a Member of Parliament, and in his executive capacity, is accountable The incumbent Prime Minister is Gordon Brown, who took over from Tony Blair on 27th June 2007.

The political quagmire of the prime minister accepting his country's complicity in genocide: Robyn Urback© Chris Wattie/Reuters A woman holds a sign during the closing ceremony of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Gatineau, Que., on Monday.

My colleague Neil Macdonald put words to the ideas none of us really wants to hear, that "benign indifference" on the part of some Canadians "prompted the MMIWG commissioners to deploy the incendiary accusation of genocide against Canadian society."

Macdonald's reasoning on that is probably correct, since even those who think the term "genocide" is misapplied are forced to consider Canada's treatment of Indigenous peoples to make an argument against the report's conclusion. Indifference is fuel to systemic injustice, and eliciting some sort of reaction — even incredulousness — is arguably better than nothing at all.

Reasonable people can disagree on whether the term accurately applies to Canada today. For example, the outright racist laws of the past — such as Canada's eugenics laws of the early 20th century — are no longer on the books, but reports of coerced sterilization of Indigenous women in Saskatoon and elsewhere continue, to the same effect as the old laws. But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's acceptance of the MMIWG report's conclusion — "we accept the finding that this was genocide," he said Tuesday — has broader implications than just making a point.

As an Indigenous Woman, I Was Triggered By the MMIWG Report

As an Indigenous Woman, I Was Triggered By the MMIWG Report “The true power of the inquiry does not lie in the hands of the government. It lies with us—the survivors, families and people who the inquiry is about”

When preparing my study of The Prime Minister : The Office and Its Holders since 1945, I used a As far as I could discover this analysis was not shown to Clement Attlee or any of his successors and 1: Appointment and dismissal of ministers (final approval of their parliamentary private secretaries and

The title ‘ prime minister ’ was originally a term of abuse rather than a description of an official role. Moreover, through his control of the Treasury Walpole was able to extend his power throughout the country and help ensure that parliamentary elections – in which only a tiny proportion of men (and no

To a certain degree it is ambiguous, hinging on what Trudeau's definition of "was" is. Does "was" mean "in the past, but no longer"? Or is Trudeau referring to all of the past and current conditions chronicled in the report when he says "this was genocide"? Either way, if the prime minister accepts that genocide was or is happening in Canada, shouldn't he say where and when, so that those responsible can be held accountable?

Genocide is a legal term — a crime — which, according to the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, shall be tried "by a competent tribunal of the State in the territory of which the act was committed." Countries that have ratified the genocide convention, which include Canada, are obliged to both prevent and punish the perpetrators of genocide.

This means that if Trudeau is serious when he says "this was genocide," legal proceedings will be forthcoming (the implications of which, needless to say, would be enormous). If they are not, which is the infinitely more likely course, Trudeau sends a message about how serious he is when he calls the treatment of Indigenous Peoples "genocide." This is the quagmire in which the prime minister now finds himself.

Feds would ‘absolutely’ support OAS probe into MMIWG report’s allegation of genocide: Bennett

Feds would ‘absolutely’ support OAS probe into MMIWG report’s allegation of genocide: Bennett Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett says the government would support an international probe.

Investigating Canada

On top of that, there will be broad geopolitical implications, some of which have already started to become evident. On Tuesday, Luis Almagro, secretary general of the Organization of American States, an international forum on justice and peace for 35 member states in the Western Hemisphere, sent a letter to Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland proposing the creation of an interdisciplinary group of independent experts to investigate the genocide charge stemming from the report.

"Given that your country has always sided with scrutiny and international investigation in situations where human rights are violated in different countries," he wrote, "I am expecting to receive a favourable response to this request."

Other organizations or governments might not be so cordial. Last summer, when Canada found itself in a diplomatic spat with Saudi Arabia over a couple tweets about the kingdom's human rights record, the Saudis mobilized a social media campaign based on the notion that Canada is actually the more oppressive state, citing, among other things, data on missing and murdered Indigenous women. Should that happen again, the Saudis now have the word "genocide" in their arsenal, and they can cite it as coming directly from the prime minister's lips.

Genocide against Indigenous women and girls 'obvious,' says chief commissioner

Genocide against Indigenous women and girls 'obvious,' says chief commissioner VANCOUVER — The chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls says the final report has started difficult conversations, but Canada must know the truth before it can achieve reconciliation. Marion Buller made the remarks in a speech in Vancouver at a conference on the topic held by the University of British Columbia in collaboration with Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The inquiry's

Indeed, Trudeau's acceptance that Canada is a genocidal nation inevitably weakens our moral authority when lecturing the Chinese about gender equity, or the U.S. vice-president about abortion access. One could make the case that we never had that moral authority to begin with, since Canada's treatment of Indigenous people doesn't suddenly become worse because it has a new name. But a label does change the perception of Canada in the eyes of other nations, especially when the Canadian prime minister confirms the label is accurate.

It's plausible there will be a domestic effect as well. There is a faction of hysterical Trudeau-haters (no, not me — relax) who love to call him a "traitor," citing years-old gaffes and the very complicated decision to award a multimillion-dollar settlement to Omar Khadr. But this line — prime minister says his own country is guilty of genocide — could reasonably gain traction outside of typical "Turd-eau" circles. Indeed, the prime minister might find it hard to at once campaign on a positive image of Canada, while also charging it of committing one of the worst atrocities known to man.

The irony in all of this is the Trudeau government has probably done the most, though certainly not close to enough, to improve the lives of Indigenous Canadians of any federal government in recent decades, but it will nevertheless wear the "genocide" label. But at the same time, it is just a word. And despite the real political implications for the government, it has little tangible effect on the lives of survivors. They're still missing their loved ones, or struggling for custody or trying to escape an exploitative situation. That's an added tragedy in all of this: the report, and its conclusion, is just words.

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