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CanadaCrane smashes into Montreal's CHUM hospital, closing blood lab

15:11  10 june  2019
15:11  10 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Language barrier causes St. Mary’s Hospital to allegedly refuse services to elderly patient

Language barrier causes St. Mary’s Hospital to allegedly refuse services to elderly patient Lien Quan, 91, and her family claim she was refused services at St. Mary's hospital because she did not speak English. Lien Quan and her family have filed a formal complaint against St. Mary's Hospital after they claim hospital staff refused to provide necessary care to Quan beca The 91-year-old went to the hospital, which is located in the Côte-des-Neiges–Notre-Dame-de-Grâce borough, for a regular eye exam. Her son, Ming Fung Lai, accompanied her.

Language barrier causes St. Mary’ s Hospital to allegedly refuse services to elderly patient. Lien Quan, 91, and her family claim she was refused services at St. Mary' s hospital because she did not speak English.

CBC Reporter stephen.j.rukavina@cbc.ca. Montreal .

Crane smashes into Montreal's CHUM hospital, closing blood lab © Radio-Canada The crane collapsed and slammed into the side of the CHUM.

Part of a downtown hospital is closed today in Montreal after a crane partially collapsed and smashed into the building, breaking through an exterior wall.

Workers were dismantling part of the crane Sunday when it fell on the Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM).

It broke through the building's exterior, but nobody was injured in the incident.

A permitter was set up around the site to deter people from getting too close to the wreckage.

The crane has since been removed from the site, leaving a few missing wall panels, a smashed vent and some exposed insulation.

A section of the hospital where blood samples are taken has been closed Monday.

The hospital says all other services will be be open as usual for the day.

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Montreal health officials say students need more protection from carbon monoxide.
Montreal public health officials recommend accelerating the installation of carbon monoxide detectors in schools and to closely monitor those who have been affected by the toxic gas — checking for possible long-term health issues. The CIUSSS South-Central-Island made the announcement Tuesday in relation to the gas leak that affected some 265 students, as well as employees and teachers. Education Minister Jean-François Roberge had issued a province-wide directive following the incident making it mandatory for all Quebec schools to have carbon monoxide detectors.

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