Canada: Edmonton cousin of ISIS recruits loses appeal in U.S. extradition case - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

CanadaEdmonton cousin of ISIS recruits loses appeal in U.S. extradition case

21:01  11 june  2019
21:01  11 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Edmonton cousin of ISIS recruits argues case to extradite him to U.S. relies on hearsay

Edmonton cousin of ISIS recruits argues case to extradite him to U.S. relies on hearsay The case for the extradition of an Edmonton man accused of financing his ISIS cousins relies on hearsay and unreliable witnesses, the Court of Appeal of Alberta heard Wednesday. Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, 34, is fighting extradition to the United States to face charges of conspiring to provide and providing material support to ISIS recruits. The record of the case, which summarizes the U.S government's evidence, cites two witnesses: a cousin who was once a suspect as well as the widow of a deceased recruit who says her husband told her Abdullahi sent him $3,000 US via Western Union.

The case for the extradition of an Edmonton man accused of financing his ISIS cousins relies on hearsay and unreliable witnesses, the Court of Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, 34, is fighting extradition to the United States to face charges of conspiring to provide and providing material support to ISIS

The Court of Appeal of Alberta has upheld a decision to extradite an Edmonton man accused of funding his cousins who went overseas to fight for ISIS .Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, 34, has been fighting extradition to the United States

Edmonton cousin of ISIS recruits loses appeal in U.S. extradition case© The Associated Press Fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) group parade through the city of Mosul in a file photo.

The Court of Appeal of Alberta has upheld a decision to extradite an Edmonton man accused of funding his cousins who went overseas to fight for ISIS.

Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, 34, has been fighting extradition to the United States, where he would face charges of conspiring to provide and providing material support to foreign fighters in Syria.

"We agree with the extradition judge that the ROC (record of the case) contained sufficient evidence to allow a reasonable jury, properly instructed, to convict," the justices wrote in a decision released Tuesday. "There is nothing in the record to indicate the evidence is manifestly unreliable."

'Double criminality' issues in Meng case unlike 'run-of-the mill' extraditions: lawyer

'Double criminality' issues in Meng case unlike 'run-of-the mill' extraditions: lawyer 'Double criminality' issues in Meng case unlike 'run-of-the mill' extraditions: lawyer

The Court of Appeal of Alberta has upheld a decision to extradite an Edmonton man accused of funding his cousins who went overseas to fight for ISIS . Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, 34, has been fighting extradition to the United States, where he would face charges of conspiring to provide and

Edmonton ISIS recruits groomed cousins for years, court documents say . Another witness — a younger cousin and former alleged The case to extradite an Edmonton man accused of financing his ISIS cousins relies on hearsay Edmonton man appeals extradition to U . S . on terrorism charges.

The record of the case is a summary of the U.S. government's evidence.

Abdullahi is accused of robbing an Edmonton jewelry store to help fund a terrorist cell that included his three cousins, who left Edmonton for Syria in 2013. It's believed they were killed there one year later.

In May 2018, Court of Queen's Bench Justice John Little granted the order to extradite Abdullahi to the United States.

His appeal of that ruling was heard last week. His lawyer, Akram Attia, argued that the ROC would not meet the standards for evidence in a criminal trial in Canada.

Attia said the case relied on hearsay provided to the witnesses from some foreign fighters who are no longer alive.

Abdullahi could still ask for leave to appeal at the Supreme Court of Canada.

More to come....

Read more

Alberta asks Court of Appeal to look at constitutionality of federal carbon tax.
EDMONTON — Alberta's justice minister says the province is asking for a legal opinion on the constitutionality of the federal government imposing its carbon tax. At a news conference Thursday, Doug Schweitzer said the province has filed a reference case with the Alberta Court of Appeal. "The federal government has recently announced that it will impose a carbon tax on Albertans starting January 1, 2020," he said in Edmonton. "Our government contends this constitutes federal overreach into our exclusive provincial jurisdiction to manage our own affairs in a way that is suitable to local conditions.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!