Canada: Quebec government aims to define religious symbols in amendment to secularism bill - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaQuebec government aims to define religious symbols in amendment to secularism bill

07:30  12 june  2019
07:30  12 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Legault government trying to adopt secularism bill ahead of summer break

Legault government trying to adopt secularism bill ahead of summer break MONTREAL — The Coalition Avenir Quebec government is running out of time and into a battle over what constitutes a religious symbol as it pushes to adopt the secularism bill promised in last fall's election campaign. Premier Francois Legault and his cabinet have stated they want the bill banning many public sector workers from wearing religious symbols passed before the legislature's scheduled summer break this Friday. But the premier Wednesday

The Quebec government has tabled its long-awaited secularism bill , laying down proposed ground rules it says will ensure the religious neutrality The preamble to the bill explains the Coalition Avenir Québec government 's motivation. The Quebec nation, it says, "has its own characteristics, one of

QUEBEC — Amid accusations it is legalizing discrimination, the Legault government Thursday defended its new secularism bill Unlike the former Parti Québécois government , which went so far as to create pictograms of banned symbols with Radarsat Constellation aims to launch Wednesday.

Quebec government aims to define religious symbols in amendment to secularism bill© Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press Immigration Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette is the architect behind Quebec's secularism bill.

The Quebec government is offering a first concession to critics of its proposed law restricting religious symbols worn by some civil servants.

Tuesday afternoon, Immigration Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette tabled the amendment which would define what a religious symbol is.

The amendment seeks to define a religious symbol as "any article of clothing, accessory, headgear or jewelry that is worn as a show of faith or religious conviction" and "is reasonably considered as referring to a religious affiliation."

Quebec government to invoke closure on controversial secularism, immigration bills

Quebec government to invoke closure on controversial secularism, immigration bills MONTREAL — The Quebec government will invoke closure in order to force through controversial bills on secularism and immigration that it says must be adopted before the summer break. That means the legislature will sit exceptionally over the weekend to debate the government's proposed secularism bill, known as Bill 21, and Bill 9 on immigration reform. By invoking closure, the Coalition Avenir Quebec government will curtail debate and use its

Debate over religious symbols illustrates how views in the province on rights, religion and diversity differ Secularism , or laïcité, the separation of religion from government , has preoccupied politicians in the province On March 27, in the latest bid to legislate a vision of secularism in the province, the

The government of Premier François Legault is expected to introduce its so-called secularism bill as early “A law aimed at forbidding the wearing of religious symbols violates the Charter and violates our And the injunction filed by the teachers’ federation in Quebec Superior Court Tuesday aims to

The bill has been criticized for banning symbols without defining them, making enforcement complicated.

Despite tabling of the amendment, Jolin-Barrette said he doesn't think it's necessary to define what a religious symbol is.

However, groups such as unions and school board representatives called for one.

In May, three UN legal experts joined them by sending a letter to the Canadian mission in Geneva which said that the bill threatens freedoms protected by the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The letter said that the bill doesn't define what a religious symbol is, adding that it would be "extremely inappropriate" for a government to decide whether a symbol is religious or not.

"I'm listening," Jolin-Barrette said Tuesday evening.

"I take a step in their direction — I hope they will take a step in my direction," he said.

The government wants the bill passed by Friday, when the legislature is scheduled to break for the summer.

However, Premier François Legault said that it might be possible to recall MNAs for an extraordinary summer session in order to get the religious symbols bill passed.

Trudeau says he will defend minority rights in face of Quebec religious-symbol law.
MONTREAL — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau added his voice Thursday to the growing opposition to Quebec's new law prohibiting teachers, police officers and other public servants in positions of authority from wearing religious symbols. Speaking to reporters in Washington, D.C., Trudeau said he and his government will defend minority rights everywhere in Canada. 

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