Canada: Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill, rejects most of the Tory ones - - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaFederal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill, rejects most of the Tory ones

22:15  12 june  2019
22:15  12 june  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

McKenna considering Senate changes to environmental-assessment bill

McKenna considering Senate changes to environmental-assessment bill OTTAWA — Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says she is carefully considering the amendments the Senate has made to the Liberal government's environmental-assessment bill. McKenna says she is pleased Bill C-69 made it through the Senate Thursday night despite attempts by the Conservatives to delay or weaken the bill. Senators made more than 180 changes to the government bill, which creates a new agency and process for assessing the environmental, health, social and economic impacts of major resource and transportation projects, including mines and interprovincial pipelines and highways.

The government has accepted dozens of amendments proposed by a multi-partisan group of senators — specifically, language that Liberals reject most Tory amendments to environmental assessment bill . The government also affirmed legislated timelines for how long it will take for a

The government has accepted dozens of amendments proposed by a multi-partisan group of senators — specifically, language that will strengthen the role of the provinces in the review process and changes that will limit the ability of the environment minister to start and stop project review

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill, rejects most of the Tory ones© Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press Pro-pipeline supporters rally outside a public hearing of the Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources regarding Bill C-69 in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, April 9, 2019.

The federal Liberal government has accepted some substantial Senate changes to its environmental assessment overhaul legislation — but has rejected 90 per cent of those proposed by Conservative parliamentarians that environmental groups warned would weaken the review process.

The Senate passed an unprecedented 188 amendments to Bill C-69 after months of study and a cross-country committee tour to regions most affected by changes to the natural resources and energy regulatory regime. All told, the government has accepted 62 of those Senate amendments verbatim and accepted 37 others with some substantial tweaks.

Alberta opponents of B.C. oil tanker ban denounce Senate vote keeping bill alive

Alberta opponents of B.C. oil tanker ban denounce Senate vote keeping bill alive Opponents in Alberta to the federal Liberal government’s bill to ban oil tanker traffic in northern B.C. waters are denouncing the Senate’s decision to keep the proposed legislation alive despite a committee report that recommended C-48 be scrapped. In a vote on Thursday night, the Senate decided by a margin of 53-38 — with one abstention — to reject the Conservative-written committee report and allow the bill to proceed to third reading in the Senate, during which amendments can be proposed.

The federal government has accepted dozens of changes to its environmental assessment overhaul legislation, but has rejected 90 per cent of the amendments

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill , rejects most of the Tory ones . The premiers of Alberta Alberta Premier Jason Kenney issued a statement earlier in the day saying the decision to reject many of the Conservative amendments goes against common

The legislation will be now sent back to the Senate, which must accept the Liberal government's changes if the legislation is to be passed into law.

The government has accepted dozens of amendments proposed by a multi-partisan group of senators — specifically, language that will strengthen the role of the provinces in the review process and changes that will limit the ability of the environment minister to start and stop project review timelines (the government has agreed much of that power should fall to the new regulatory agency, the Impact Assessment Agency).

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill, rejects most of the Tory ones© Frank Gunn/Canadian Press Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna: "(Conservatives) want us to copy and paste recommendations written by oil lobbyists."

The government has agreed the agency should be forced to post on its website its reasons for suspending a project review timeline.

Trudeau calls out Tory premiers for 'playing games' with national unity over C-69

Trudeau calls out Tory premiers for 'playing games' with national unity over C-69 OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says it is "absolutely irresponsible" for conservative premiers to threaten to tear Canada apart if the government doesn't accept all the Senate's amendments to new environmental-assessment legislation. The Liberals are expected to say as early as Wednesday what they want to do with the 187 amendments made to Bill C-69 in the Senate last week. The bill would revamp the way the federal government evaluates major infrastructure projects, from pipelines to interprovincial highways.

OTTAWA - The federal Liberals will accept nearly 100 changes the Senate has made to a bill overhauling the federal environmental -assessment process for major construction projects but are rejecting dozens McKenna is rejecting 90 per cent of the amendments made by Conservatives

OTTAWA—The federal government has rejected almost all the changes Conservative senators made to its environmental assessment legislation, defying the She said the government was only open to amendments it felt improved the bill , and so it rejected 90 per cent of the changes proposed by

The government also backed a Senate amendment that will give the agency more power to decide who should be allowed to participate in regulatory hearings.

While the amended bill says the public will still have an opportunity to "participate meaningfully" in those hearings, the government has accepted a Senate change that calls for participation "in a manner that the agency considers appropriate."

That change is important to industry groups who feared that, by eliminating the "standing test" entirely, the government risked allowing people with tenuous connections to a project — environmental activists in particular — to overwhelm regulatory hearings, to the detriment of parties directly affected by the project.

In addition to giving the agency more discretion on timelines and public participation at hearings, the government has agreed to Senate language that essentially will bar the environment minister from directing the head of the agency to do something — a measure designed to ensure the independence of the assessments agency.

Liberals reject most Tory amendments to environmental assessment bill

Liberals reject most Tory amendments to environmental assessment bill Liberals reject most Tory amendments to environmental assessment bill

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill , rejects most of the Tory ones . The federal Liberal government has accepted some substantial Senate changes to its environmental assessment overhaul legislation — but has rejected 90 per cent of those proposed by

+ The federal Liberals will accept nearly 100 changes the Senate has made to a bill overhauling the federal environmental -assessment process for major construction projects but are rejecting dozens more , including nearly all of those proposed by Conservative senators. Conservative Sen.

The government also affirmed legislated timelines for how long it will take for a project to go through the assessment process. The federal cabinet will retain the "final decision" on approving major resources projects — a substantial power that essentially gives the federal government of the day a veto.

"We're accepting amendments that would depoliticize the process, reducing the minister's discretion in favour of the impact assessment agency," Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said. "We will not be accepting amendments that weaken the rules.

"Let's be clear on what Conservative politicians want. They want to replace environmental review with (a) pipeline approval process. They want us to copy and paste recommendations written by oil lobbyists.

"That's why we rejected 90 per cent of the Conservative amendments. They're unacceptable to us and they're unacceptable to Canadians."

However, some of the amendments the government accepted — changes to the public participation process, for example — were proposed by groups like the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP).

Provincial energy ministers say 'cherry-picking' 99 changes to Bill C-69 isn't enough

Provincial energy ministers say 'cherry-picking' 99 changes to Bill C-69 isn't enough Provincial energy ministers from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario are in Calgary to share their reactions to what amendments the federal government has accepted to Bill C-69.

The federal government is rejecting most of the amendments proposed by Conservative senators to Bill C-69. Many of those amendments were heavily criticized by environment groups that said C-69 provided some balance between protecting the environment and economic growth.

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill , rejects most of the Tory ones . The Liberal government accepted substantial changes to C-69 this week, but rejected almost all amendments put forward by the Conservatives.

Among the rejected amendments were those the government saw as diluting provisions of the bill relating to Indigenous peoples — provisions the government has presented as the best way to avoid some of legal pitfalls the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project experienced as a result of Indigenous-led litigation.

The bill, as originally written, said the minister "must" take into account any adverse impacts that a project may have on the rights of Indigenous peoples before deciding whether to put a project through a federal review. A Senate amendment changed "must" to "may."

The government also has restored language that ensures a project review must consider "any" change occurring in Canada to the health, social or economic conditions of Indigenous peoples. Industry groups said that stipulation might be too heavy a burden for project proponents.

The government also has rejected a word change designed to limit the environmental review process to "significant" adverse effects alone. The qualifier "significant" didn't make the cut.

The government rejected Senate amendments to the preamble of the legislation that were designed to prioritize economic considerations in the assessments process, along with environmental protection. The government has rejected references to "providing certainty to investors and stakeholders and driving innovation."

B.C. tanker-ban, environment assessment bills scale final hurdle in Senate

B.C. tanker-ban, environment assessment bills scale final hurdle in Senate OTTAWA — A pair of controversial environmental bills scaled their final hurdle in the Senate on Thursday, over the objections of critics who warn the two pieces of legislation will kneecap Canada's oil industry and fuel separatist sentiment in Alberta. Senators passed Bill C-69, which overhauls the federal environmental assessment process for major construction projects, by a vote of 57-37. 

Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill , rejects most of the Tory ones . The Liberals have been attacked on numerous fronts for the Bill C-69 legislation including by Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and representatives from the Ontario and Saskatchewan

The most strident environmentalists will now complain anew that Trudeau has betrayed his commitment to combating climate change. Federal government accepts dozens of amendments to environmental review bill , rejects most of the Tory ones .

The government rejected amendments that would have provided for more participation by municipalities in the process, and Senate changes that would have allowed offshore petroleum board regulators — like those from the Canada-Newfoundland & Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board — to sit on assessment panels.

Environmentalists have said these boards have been "co-opted" by project proponents and regulatory bodies should have no role in the approval process for a project they might later be asked to regulate.

"The amendments we put forward were necessary to try and fix this terrible piece of legislation," Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer told reporters Wednesday.

"This piece of legislation has been dubbed the no-more pipelines bill by experts in the industry. There's near universal opposition to it ... we're very concerned to hear they're dismissing these very important amendments we put forward.

"Making a terrible piece of legislation slightly less terrible is not a great way to support an industry. You'll pardon me if I don't take a lot of solace in the fact they're recognized some of their initial errors."

More to come.

Read more

Jason Kenney will challenge passage of Bills C-69 and C-48 in the courts.
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says the province will challenge the passage of two controversial federal bills in the courts. Bill C-69, which changes Canada's environmental assessment process, and Bill C-48, which bans tanker traffic from a stretch of B.C.'s north coast, were both passed Thursday night in the Senate. © Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press Pro-pipline supporters rally outside a public hearing of the Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources regarding Bill C-69 in Calgary on April 9.

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