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CanadaFederal cabinet decision on fate of Trans Mountain pipeline due Tuesday

21:25  16 june  2019
21:25  16 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

Don’t waste any more money on the Trans Mountain pipeline

Don’t waste any more money on the Trans Mountain pipeline Justin Trudeau is in over a barrel. In 2015, he made a deal with Alberta. He would get an oil pipeline built to a coast if the province joined his pan-Canadian climate plan. After his election this past April, Conservative Alberta Premier Jason Kenney ripped up Alberta’s side of the bargain and declared war on Trudeau‘s climate plan. What should Ottawa do now after being jilted by Alberta? Should the Liberal government maintain its side of the bargain, and proceed with the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton to the Vancouver area and lose credibility as a climate warrior? Or should it kill the pipeline expansion now and say this was a bargain gone bad.

OTTAWA -- The Liberal government's .5 billion gamble to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline in a bid to get it expanded will come to a head on Tuesday when the federal cabinet decides whether to sign off on the project for a second time. It has been more than 290 days since the Federal Court of

Trans Mountain Corporation, the federal crown corporation that now runs the existing Trans Mountain pipeline and will oversee the expansion should it go ahead, said last week that much of the material had been ordered before the court ruling. The pipeline is a tough needle for the Liberals to thread

Federal cabinet decision on fate of Trans Mountain pipeline due Tuesday© Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc

OTTAWA — The Liberal government's $4.5-billion gamble to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline in a bid to get it expanded will come to a head on Tuesday when the federal cabinet decides whether to sign off on the project for a second time.

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi says the decision is coming by Tuesday after official consultations with affected Indigenous communities wrapped up earlier this month.

It's been more than 290 days since the Federal Court of Appeal ripped up the original approval and sent the government back to the drawing board.

The court said the government hadn't done a proper consultation with affected Indigenous communities and it failed to take into account the impact the project would have on marine life off the coast of British Columbia.

The National Energy Board has since taken another look at the marine shipping impacts and recommended the project proceed again, along with 16 new conditions.

The project to triple the capacity of the existing pipeline is a political lightning rod for the federal Liberals, who are trying to find a way to appease both the energy sector and environmental groups.

The Canadian Press

Read more

Varcoe: Indigenous ownership of Trans Mountain moves closer to reality.
Imagine First Nations across Western Canada being able to buy the lion’s share of the Trans Mountain pipeline from the federal government. Now, imagine it builds greater acceptance for the project. Finally, imagine the ownership generates $250 million a year for First Nations and Metis communities, with some of that money used to create a sovereign wealth fund capable of buying additional infrastructure assets. During a presentation at the

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