Canada: Woman chased by bear is nervous about leaving house - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaWoman chased by bear is nervous about leaving house

23:36  11 july  2019
23:36  11 july  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Grizzlies with taste for trash make mess in Rocky Mountain House

Grizzlies with taste for trash make mess in Rocky Mountain House The search is on for two young garbage-hungry grizzly bears in the Rocky Mountain House area.

A woman in Waasis says she was chased into her home last weekend by what she says is the largest black bear she's ever seen.

Melanie Lautard was sitting on her deck in the rural community of Waasis on July 6 when she heard the sound of breaking branches in the treeline near her home.

When she looked behind her, she thought she saw a dog, but then she stood up to get a closer look.

"I realized it was a bear and I started going toward my door to open it, to get in and away from it, and as soon as I stood up, the bear ran at me," Lautard said.

Woman chased by bear is nervous about leaving house © Cassidy Chisholm/CBC Melanie Lautard says she was sitting on her deck in Waasis when a black bear started running toward her deck.

"It came right to the edge of the deck and I got into the house as fast as I could and locked it."

Curious bear wanders into Canmore barbecue joint during dinner rush

Curious bear wanders into Canmore barbecue joint during dinner rush Petr Holub has seen patrons of all kinds walk through the doors of his Canmore Brazilian barbecue restaurant. 

Lautard said she was outside by herself — her four children were in the house — and she ran inside and called  her boyfriend. He was just pulling into the driveway, which frightened the bear away.

She said she hasn't seen the bear since, but she's still worried about going outside her home, which is about 20  kilometres southeast of Fredericton.

"We definitely hear noises, so we're a little scared, especially with people with kids," she said.

"I haven't wanted to bring my kids out because if the bear is willing to chase me, just sitting there, not doing anything, then I just get scared. You just never know."

Woman chased by bear is nervous about leaving house © Submitted by Bob Crocker Bears aren't usually found in residential areas, but young bears could be looking for food, according to Kevin Craig, a wildlife biologist.

This isn't the first time something like this has happened in the area. In 2013, a forestry worker survived an attack by a black bear near Oromocto Lake, southwest of Fredericton.

Whitehorse women abandon bikes, jump in Yukon River to evade bears

Whitehorse women abandon bikes, jump in Yukon River to evade bears Michelle Beaulieu and her friend were biking toward Canyon City last week when a bear suddenly ran at them. The whole ordeal has made Beaulieu more nervous about being in the woods. Now, she's stressing the importance of bear awareness when out on the trails.

At this time of year, young bears are often looking for a place to settle, according to Kevin Craig, a wildlife biologist with the Department of Energy and Resource Development.

"They're really trying to find their way in the world and to do that, they disperse from where they've basically grown up with their mother and disperse into different communities across the landscape," Craig said.

He said the bear was likely looking for food and was attracted to smells coming from the residential area.

He said to prevent bears from coming near your home, people shouldn't leave garbage outside overnight and make sure bird feeders are more than two metres off the ground.

I want it to be gone and not be scared to come outside. - Melanie Lautard

He said New Brunswick has a healthy population of black bears, more than 17,000, and sometimes they make their way into neighbourhoods that are wooded.

Whitehorse women abandon bikes, jump in Yukon River to evade bears

Whitehorse women abandon bikes, jump in Yukon River to evade bears Michelle Beaulieu and her friend were biking toward Canyon City last week when a bear suddenly ran at them. The whole ordeal has made Beaulieu more nervous about being in the woods. Now, she's stressing the importance of bear awareness when out on the trails.

"New Brunswick is relatively heavily forested, including many of our cities and towns, and animals, including black bears, and can sometimes take advantage of those forested areas to look for natural foods," he said. "But also, if they come into contact with human-associated foods that are available, they'll certainly take advantage of that."

Lautard said she didn't have any garbage out at the time, but she said some people have seen a mother bear and cubs in the area.

She also said her garbage bins were knocked down the next day.

Lautard said she hasn't been taking her children outside as much, but when they do go outside, they bring their dog so it can warn them if a bear is approaching.

She's hoping the bear will find a new place to roam.

"I want it to be gone and not be scared to come outside," she said.

Orphaned bear, Charlie, shot just 12 days after being released into wild.
An orphaned bear that was released into the wild just two weeks ago was shot and killed after it wandered near children on private land. The bear's death has sparked an investigation by the province, and concerns from the facility that rehabilitated it about how it was released. Two orphaned black bear cubs, Charlie, a male, and Maskwa, a female, were taken in by the Cochrane Ecological Institute in 2018 when they both weighed under 10 kilograms. The two bears, now 16-months-old, were released separately on June 20 in different remote areas of southwestern Alberta where they were initially found.

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