Canada: Imported wine, cider now allowed on B.C. grocery shelves - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

CanadaImported wine, cider now allowed on B.C. grocery shelves

10:36  12 july  2019
10:36  12 july  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

A grocery store's plan to shame shoppers for using plastic bags completely backfired

A grocery store's plan to shame shoppers for using plastic bags completely backfired A grocery store's plan to shame shoppers for using plastic bags completely backfired

+ Grocery store shelves lined only with B . C .-made wines are soon going to look different. As part of the revised North American Free Trade Agreement , Canada agreed to end a policy that allows grocery stores to stock only B . C . wines . Story continues below.

VANCOUVER—The province must stop allowing only B . C . wine on grocery store shelves by November 2019, according to one of the provisions B . C .’s minister of Jobs, Training and Technology told StarMetro on Monday that the agreement on B . C . wine sales didn’t come as a surprise to the

Imported wine, cider now allowed on B.C. grocery shelves© Ben Nelms/CBC B.C wine is pictured for sale at Save-On-Foods grocery store in Richmond British Columbia on Thursday July 11, 2019. As of this week, locally made B.C. wines and ciders have lost their exclusive spot on the province's grocery store shelves.

B.C. regulations previously provided two options for grocery stores to sell wine. Under one option, grocers could sell B.C. wine on grocery store shelves. Under the the second option, both imported and domestic wine could be sold in a separate liquor store inside the grocery store.

The U.S. filed complaints with the World Trade Organization over the first option, the so-called "wine on the shelf" system, alleging it gave B.C. wine makers an unfair advantage.

The LCBO Is Warning Customers That Ontario Stores Are Currently Running Out Of Alcohol (PHOTOS)

The LCBO Is Warning Customers That Ontario Stores Are Currently Running Out Of Alcohol (PHOTOS) So much for summer day drinking.

Wine sales in B . C . grocery stores could be overhauled under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, agreed to in principle Sunday. " B . C . shall eliminate the measures which allow only B . C . wine to be sold on regular grocery store shelves while imported wine may be sold in grocery

Since then grocers slowly went about getting necessary licences and approvals. Vancouver city council voted 9-1 to ban grocers in that city from selling wine on shelves . Other cities around the province have been welcoming. Real Canadian Superstore operates grocery stores that sell wine in: •Langley

Then, in October, during negotiations surrounding the trade deal between Canada, the United States and Mexico known as CUSMA, Canada and the U.S. agreed that wine sales on B.C. supermarket shelves would no longer be limited to just offerings from within the province.

B.C.'s Ministry of the Attorney General said the policy came into effect this week, starting July 8. This means imported wines may be sold on grocery store shelves where grocery stores are licensed to sell wine.

It said it is up to each individual grocery store to decide whether or not to choose to sell imported wines, calling it a "business decision."

Supermarket chain Loblaw, which has 10 stores in British Columbia licensed to sell wine, said it was "excited about the new direction."

It says domestic and international wine will be available to B.C. customers "in the next few months."

On the other hand, Save-On-Foods' vice president of innovation Brenda Kirk said the chain will continue to curate its selection from B.C.

"Our interests when we first got into the wine business was to really build on the B.C. wines and we've done that," Kirk said. "That's our story going forward."

Victoria's plastic bag ban quashed by B.C. court.
In a unanimous decision, the court ruled that because Victoria's primary aim in enacting the ban was environment, they required approval by the Minister of Environment — something they failed to receive. The city argued the bylaw was "a valid regulation in relation to business," but in her ruling, Madam Justice Newbury wrote that wasn't the case. "The city did not set out to prohibit some types of checkout bags and encourage other types in order to interfere with or somehow improve business transactions," she wrote.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!