Canada: Evidence to be released in Halifax man's 1999 wrongful murder conviction - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaEvidence to be released in Halifax man's 1999 wrongful murder conviction

13:06  12 july  2019
13:06  12 july  2019 Source:   msn.com

Court case seeks details of how Nova Scotia man wrongfully convicted of murder

Court case seeks details of how Nova Scotia man wrongfully convicted of murder HALIFAX — A court case is underway today over the release of key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction and imprisonment of a Nova Scotia man who spent almost 17 years in jail. The Canadian Press, CBC and the Halifax Examiner are asking Justice James Chipman of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court for access to federal documents with details of how 63-year-old Glen Assoun was improperly convicted of second-degree murder on Sept. 17, 1999. It's a case where Canada's minister of justice has already declared there was "reliable and relevant evidence'' that wasn't disclosed during criminal proceedings.

HALIFAX — Key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia man who spent almost 17 years in prison should be released later this month, a senior judge decided Tuesday. The Canadian Press, CBC and the Halifax Examiner had asked Justice James Chipman for

Key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia man who spent almost 17 years in prison should be released later “We are trying to be responsible custodians of information in the preliminary assessment process … and to protect the interests of those who

Evidence to be released in Halifax man's 1999 wrongful murder conviction © Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc

HALIFAX — A federal Justice Department report that led to the release of a Halifax man wrongfully convicted of murder is expected today.

Lawyers for 63-year-old Glen Assoun say the release of hundreds of pages of documents means the public is going to learn information never put before juries and judges.

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge agreed to release the report after a case launched by The Canadian Press, CBC and the Halifax Examiner.

Assoun was wrongfully convicted of slitting Brenda Way's throat on Nov. 12, 1995 — sending to him to a federal prison where he'd suffer beatings, heart attacks and depression for a crime he's now exonerated of.

Judge calls for release of evidence in wrongful murder conviction of N.S. man

Judge calls for release of evidence in wrongful murder conviction of N.S. man HALIFAX — Key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia man who spent almost 17 years in prison should be released later this month, a senior judge decided Tuesday. 

HALIFAX — A court battle is set to unfold Tuesday over the release of key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia man who spent almost 17 years in jail. The Canadian Press

HALIFAX — A court battle is set to unfold Tuesday over the release of key evidence explaining what led to the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia man However, the woman’ s account had to be weighed against evidence from Assoun’ s sister-in-law, who testified Assoun was living in British

The federal assessment of the case, prepared by the criminal conviction review group, became the basis for Justice Minister David Lametti declaring a miscarriage of justice had occurred in the 1999 jury trial.

Lametti took the unusual step of noting that "reliable and relevant evidence" was never disclosed in Assoun's criminal proceedings.

Justice James Chipman declared Assoun innocent on March 1 after the Nova Scotia Crown dropped its case.

Assoun's lawyers, Phil Campbell and Sean MacDonald, have requested that Chipman black out the names of three informants who provided evidence to Innocence Canada, on the basis that their safety might be at risk.

The Canadian Press

Retired Mountie backs ex-colleague's analysis in Assoun wrongful conviction case.
It turns out at least two RCMP analysts concluded Glen Assoun didn't kill Brenda Way. Since documents relating to Assoun's wrongful murder conviction were released on July 12, the role of retired RCMP Const. Dave Moore has been widely reported. It was Moore, using the RCMP's Violent Crimes Analysis Linkage System, or ViCLAS, who first identified serial killer Michael McGray as a more likely suspect. Moore's information was not passed on to Assoun's defence team. When he returned from a two-week vacation, Moore had been transferred out of the ViCLAS unit and his files were destroyed.

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