Canada: Scientists spot rare life as remotely operated vehicles livestream off N.S. coast - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

CanadaScientists spot rare life as remotely operated vehicles livestream off N.S. coast

06:30  01 september  2019
06:30  01 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

Sunshine Coast RCMP find body believed to be that of missing kayaker

Sunshine Coast RCMP find body believed to be that of missing kayaker RCMP on B.C.'s Sunshine Coast say they have recovered the 48-year-old's body. He was last seen entering the ocean at Roberts Creek Pier with a blue kayak.

Remotely operated vehicles ( ROVs ) are robotic submarines that are tethered to a ship, where “pilots” control their movement and actions. MBARI’ s two ROVs —Ventana and Doc Ricketts—are equipped with manipulator arms for grabbing, moving, or placing items in the sea.

A remotely operated vehicle spotted brightly colored coral during exploration of the Perth Trench off the coast of western Australia.Schmidt A two-week-long seafaring mission off the coast of western Australia has helped illuminate a deep and dark underwater abyss the size of the Grand Canyon.

Scientists spot rare life as remotely operated vehicles livestream off N.S. coast© Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc

HALIFAX — Research scientists are watching with fascination this weekend as a search for rare undersea life is being broadcast live by two remotely operated vessels run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration off the coast of Nova Scotia.

Already, the footage has provided never before seen images of the eastern slope of the Gully, Canada's first marine protected area, revealing sea sponges that will require DNA testing to identify and vast fields of deepwater coral.

Ellen Kenchington, a federal marine biologist with the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, says the huge television screen at her command centre in Halifax creates a rare opportunity to observe what's living on the ocean bottom.

Canadian, American scientists team up to explore deep ocean floor off Nova Scotia

Canadian, American scientists team up to explore deep ocean floor off Nova Scotia Cameras will live stream never-before seen images of Canada's deep water ocean canyons

A survey of the Atlantic Coast has detected hundreds of gas plumes – almost certainly methane – seeping up from the ocean floor. In 2013, researchers explored a handful of these seeps with Jason, a remotely operated vehicle , finding them [Photos: Unique Life Found at East Coast Gas Seep].

“Right off Laguna, we found a jet engine lying there on the sand,” said James Lindholm, a fish ecologist and a professor at Cal State Monterey Bay The fishing ban includes miles of ocean along the Laguna Beach coast . The newly restricted zones are known as Marine Protected Areas, imposed

"It's so cool," she said. "People who study forests can walk in a forest. We don't get to do that usually."

On Saturday, the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer was filming in waters of about 350 metres, and at one point viewers were treated to spectacular and frightening tight shots of a huge lobster devouring a squid one tentacle at a time.

On Thursday, the cameras revealed the existence of large fields of bamboo coral at depths of over a kilometre — a sight that Kenchington said demonstrates there are still many things scientists don't know about the life in the Gully, about 200 kilometres off Nova Scotia's east coast.

The steep sides of the underwater preserve plunge down more than 2.5 kilometres, creating habitat for a vast range of life — including the endangered bottlenose whales that hunt for squid more than a kilometre beneath the surface.

Woman Had Body of Twin Growing Inside Her, With Teeth, Bones and 'Hairy Cheesy Material' Found in Abdomen

Woman Had Body of Twin Growing Inside Her, With Teeth, Bones and 'Hairy Cheesy Material' Found in Abdomen This is the first case of an adult woman with fetus in fetu—an extremely rare condition that affects one in 500,000 live births.

Using nets, sampling bottles, and a small remotely operated vehicle ( ROV ), they compared the animal communities associated with the icebergs to communities in the Because of rising temperatures, an increasing number of icebergs have been breaking off from Antarctic glaciers and ice sheets to drift

Remotely operated vehicles ( ROV ) (Fig. 5.39) are used in conjunction with floating vessel operations to provide and deliver work and observation elements. ROVs are piloted tethered submersible vehicles controlled from the vessel via a reinforced umbilical cable as the main tethering device.

Previous research has been on the western wall and the seafloor of the Gully, but the eastern area hasn't received the same attention.

That was the focus of the visit of the visit by the NOAA vessel, which is operating as part of an international agreement between Canada, the United States and and the European Union to increase knowledge of the North Atlantic Ocean.

The researchers say they're trying to understand the Gully's deep canyons in part to find ways to ensure the recovery of the endangered bottlenose whales.

Kenchington said it's believed that the whales rely on a species of squid for food, but it's less clear where the squid are located and what their abundance is.

"Everything we learn builds on our previous knowledge and eventually we'll understand just what those whales are feeding on," she said.

The Gully area — about 2,360 square kilometres — was also originally protected in 2004 because of the diversity of deepwater coral.

These Whales Are Going Extinct In Canada & Scientists Say It Was Totally Avoidable

These Whales Are Going Extinct In Canada & Scientists Say It Was Totally Avoidable They could be extinct by 2040.

A hybrid remotely operated vehicle ( ROV ) dubbed Nereus was lost while diving into the world' s second-deepest trench, the Kermadec Trench. The hybrid remotely operated vehicle ( ROV ) called Nereus (shown here) has been tasked with exploring the deepest parts of the Earth' s ocean where

Scientists say they've spotted the deepest living fish ever found — a "sea ghost" of a snailfish that floated past their camera in the Mariana Trench. A picture taken from a remotely operated vehicle ' s video shows a "sea ghost" snailfish that researchers say is the deepest living fish ever spotted .SOI

So far, 34 species of cold-water coral have been identified, but all were on the western wall of the Gully.

"In our dives on the eastern wall we saw some interesting coral we hadn't seen before with our cameras. We're not yet sure if they're new species or different shapes of species we've seen elsewhere," said Kenchington.

"We should hear back in a few months of just what was collected."

The researchers say gaining a better picture of the status of the seafloor communities is important because it will allow them to monitor changes caused by temperature changes in the ocean related to climate change — such as potential shifts in the Gulf Stream current.

"If there are major changes in the currents that feed the Gully we might then find some of the species decline while others increase in abundance," said Kenchington.

The sponge species being spotted may also have potential to provide information on potential medicines, the scientist said.

"Learning more about them may be good for all humankind," she said.

The survey continues on Sunday in an area known as the Fundian Channel-Brown Bank, south of Yarmouth, at depths of over 1,600 metres.

The expedition's data will be reviewed to update the location of the coral and sponges that were spotted during the survey during the trip along the coast.

This will be combined with the data from the previous surveys of the other wall of the Gully.

"We can update our atlas of the coral species for the Maritimes species for all of the region, which hasn't been done for over a decade ... so people can get an overview of what's living in our waters," said Kenchington.

— The livestream of the survey can be viewed at https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/livestreams/welcome.html

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press

'Nearly busted my teeth': Dinner guest bites down on a mouthful of pearls.
Eric Bourquin was sitting down to an oyster feast with a group of friends near Victoria, B.C., Saturday when he suddenly bit down on something hard.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!