Canada: Photo exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaPhoto exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public

07:05  04 september  2019
07:05  04 september  2019 Source:   globalnews.ca

B.C. man accused of murdering daughters made up loan shark, henchmen: Crown

B.C. man accused of murdering daughters made up loan shark, henchmen: Crown Berry has told the court that he owed $25,000 plus interest in gambling debts to "Paul," a Chinese casino loan shark. On Monday, Crown prosecutor Patrick Weir challenged Berry's version of events — including the existence of the henchmen and the loan shark himself — along with Berry's apparent lack of concern for his daughters' safety. Berry denied making up the scenario. READ MORE: Trial hears B.C.

+ The murder trial for a Vancouver Island man accused of killing his two young daughters is set for next spring. The trial is scheduled to start early April next year at the B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. Andrew Berry is charged with two counts of second-degree murder in connection with the death of

+ WARNING: This story contains details that some readers may find disturbing. No phone call, no email, no response. Sgt. Michael Martin with Oak Bay police told the jury at Andrew Berry ’s murder trial Wednesday he was concerned because he couldn’t reach the Oak Bay father on Christmas Day 2017.

Photo exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Felicity Don A Vancouver Island man charged with murder in the deaths of his two young daughters says a suicide note police found at the scene was a month old. Andrew Berry, centre, appears in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. Berry has pleaded not guilty to two counts of second-degree murder and is on the witness stand in his own defence.

WARNING: This story contains graphic details and images that may not be suitable for all readers.

Evidence in the trial of Andrew Berry, the Oak Bay father accused of killing his two young daughters on Christmas Day 2017, has been released to the public.

Murdered B.C. girls left note for Santa, went sledding before killing, father testifies

Murdered B.C. girls left note for Santa, went sledding before killing, father testifies WARNING: This story contains details that may be disturbing to some readers.

Cotton was testifying at Berry 's trial in Vancouver for second-degree murder in the deaths of his children, six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey. The girls were found with multiple stab wounds, lying in beds in separate bedrooms. According to the Crown, police found the Oak Bay man

Court documents show Berry and the mother of the two children were involved in an ongoing legal dispute at the time.

The evidence, which includes photos taken inside Berry's apartment after the murders as well a note he wrote to his sister from his hospital bed, was made public on Tuesday as a jury weighs two very different narratives in this case.

Berry claims he was tackled twice and stabbed in the throat and chest. He suffered 16 stab wounds and his apartment and clothes were covered in blood.

Forensic results revealed Berry’s DNA was throughout the suite, with a 1-in-96 quintillion chance that it could be someone else, the court has heard.

DNA swabs came back identifying three people in the suite, Berry and his daughters Chloe and Aubrey.

The jury has previously heard that there was no blood evidence from a fourth person, known or unknown.

B.C. man accused of murdering daughters can't explain shallow stab marks found on his body

B.C. man accused of murdering daughters can't explain shallow stab marks found on his body Photos of the knife wounds on Andrew Berry’s chest and throat were shown to a B.C. Supreme Court jury on Tuesday as the Crown tried to poke holes in Berry's claims of innocence in his daughters’ deaths.

Andrew Berry ’s lawyer questioned Oak Bay police Const. Pitor Ulanowski, and suggested that the force had made key errors. Defence was also highly critical of Deputy Chief Ray Bernoties for essentially telling the media the public was not at risk, just two hours roughly after the crime scene

READ MORE: Exhibits from Nicholas Butcher murder trial released to the public . Media were also permitted to access certain trial exhibits Thursday, including audio of the 911 call Butcher made the morning of Johnston’s death, the video of MacGillivray’s video statement and crime scene photos .

Berry says someone else killed his two daughters and violently attacked him. He had previously testified he had owed a loan shark $25,000 in gambling debts.

READ MORE: Crown paints devastating picture of morning B.C. man allegedly killed his daughters

Crown says Berry killed his daughters and then tried to commit suicide because he was in severe debt, despised his ex-wife and his parents, and was on the brink of losing custody of his children.

In hospital, Berry was unable to speak because of his injuries. He responded to his sister, an RCMP officer, in a hand-written note, saying, "I don’t remember what I did but I tried suicide. I left [a] note on table. I don’t know why my eye is black.”

Berry ends the note saying his ex-wife "treated me so like I didn’t matter, mom was joining in. The lies... created to get their way was absurd and I couldn’t stand up to them."

Photo exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public© Provided by Corus Television Limited Partnership

Photo exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public© Provided by Corus Television Limited PartnershipPhoto exhibits from Andrew Berry murder trial released to the public© Provided by Corus Television Limited Partnership

B.C. father says he doesn't know why he didn't deny killing girls after attack

B.C. father says he doesn't know why he didn't deny killing girls after attack VANCOUVER — A Crown attorney asked a Vancouver Island father why he didn't tell his sister he hadn't killed his daughters or that they were attacked in his apartment. In B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, Patrick Weir asked Andrew Berry about a note he exchanged with his sister when he was in hospital following the alleged attack. Berry is accused of second-degree murder in the stabbing deaths of six-year-old Chloe Berry and four-year-old Aubrey Berry in his home in Oak Bay. The trial heard earlier that Berry was stabbed in the throat and his chest and because he couldn't talk, he exchanged notes with his sister. The jury heard the note read: "I love you. I'm sorry.

Andrew Berry (born 1963) is a British evolutionary biologist and historian of science with a particular interest in Alfred Wallace. He was a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and is currently a lecturer in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.

Court documents show Berry and the mother of the two children were involved in an ongoing legal dispute at the time.

Berry previously testified that he was referring to a previous suicide attempt a month earlier. He has said repeatedly that he did not kill his girls and did not try to take his own life on Dec. 25, 2017.

Crown has questioned why Berry didn’t say something or write something declaring his innocence.

Two new defence witnesses took the stand Tuesday, including Graham Bell, a neighbour who lived across the street from Berry.

READ MORE: Crown asks why B.C. man didn’t deny killing his daughters after alleged attack

Bell testified he saw two women knocking on the windows and peering through the blinds of Berry's apartment at around 2 p.m. on Christmas Day.

“It was unusual,” he said.

Berry’s ex, Sarah Cotton, previously testified she knocked on the windows but never looked into the windows because if the girls were home she would have heard them. Cotton said she and Berry's mother went to look for the girls at at a nearby park.

Defence argued Cotton never saw anything because the girls were out tobogganing with their dad.

Crown's theory is that Chloe and Aubrey were killed around 8 a.m. Christmas morning.

Read more

Final witness called in trial of B.C. man accused of killing his daughters.
With no more evidence to hear, the trial will now move to closing arguments, which are set to begin on Sept. 17. The hiatus is due to a jury member being unavailable for several days. Barring any delays, the jury is expected to begin its deliberations on Sept. 21.

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