•   
  •   
  •   

CanadaAs the federal election looms, these are the challenges that will shape our future

10:15  11 september  2019
10:15  11 september  2019 Source:   thestar.com

Mike Smyth: Trudeau and Horgan all buddy-buddy as federal election looms

Mike Smyth: Trudeau and Horgan all buddy-buddy as federal election looms Mike Smyth: Trudeau and Horgan all buddy-buddy as federal election looms

The federal election may provide political parties temporary shelter from these storms. Either way, if the winner isn’t ready to use government for a generational project of rebuilding our aging policy scaffolding, expect their celebration to be short-lived. Canadians understand we are being

Here the snow will be deeper and the temperatures lower, but you won't be too cold as Russians have ways to stay warm. Best of all is the Russian Steam Bath. You can sit in the steam and when you find yourself hot and sweaty, you can do as the Russians do and jump in the snow outside to cool off.

As the federal election looms, these are the challenges that will shape our future© Pascal Le Segretain “Canada is stuck with the inanity of sales taxes being waived for foreign digital providers like Facebook, Netflix and nyt.com while being levied on Canadian services, tilting the field against domestic competitors,” writes Edward Greenspon.

Today, 13 of the top 20 news sites in Canada are foreign and the New York Times, with a handful of reporters in Canada, is believed to be roughly on par in digital subscriptions with The Globe and Mail. Not good for our own civic culture. Whoever wins will need to get on top of these matters.

Federal Court of Appeal to rule on letting pipeline challenges proceed

Federal Court of Appeal to rule on letting pipeline challenges proceed Federal Court of Appeal to rule on letting pipeline challenges proceed

This marks Jones' second hist oric election victory, as he became the youngest elected councilman in Inkster, Michigan last year. Youth, leaders, ideas, and questions that will shape our future . "In 2015, the federal election that brought Justin Trudeau’s Liberals to power produced the highest

This is just one of the predictions from four futurists who imagine how some of our biggest challenges will play out. With a full lockdown looming , working remotely is expected to be the new norm for many professionals. But for many organisations, working outside a secure office environment could

A quarter-century on, a largely rehabilitated Kim Campbell still hasn’t lived down her admonition that elections are no time to discuss serious issues. With a new campaign starting up, Canada finds itself badly pummeled by three simultaneous global gales — technological change, climate change and geopolitical change.

Matt Gurney: Trudeau gets a new pipeline headache — just in time for the federal election

Matt Gurney: Trudeau gets a new pipeline headache — just in time for the federal election On Wednesday morning, the worst thing Justin Trudeau had to deal with was getting panned for a less-than-great interview with Hasan Minhaj. But by day’s end, an aggressive interview by the U.S. comedian was the least of the prime minister’s concerns. Justice David Stratas had seen to that. Stratas, of the Federal Court of Appeal, has decided to allow six of 12 motions for judicial review of the federal government’s second approval of the bitterly controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The expansion would triple the pipeline’s capacity, bringing Alberta energy to the B.C. coast for export abroad.

Sometime in the next few days, the 100,000th American will succumb to Covid-19 in a pandemic that President Donald Trump once predicted would just "miraculously" disappear.

This is the time where we have to ramp up our services to be very sensitive to how people are feeling. “Economic data in the near future will be not just bad but unrecognizable,” Credit Suisse said in a note on Friday. “ This will probably be the world’s first recession that starts in the service sector

The federal election may provide political parties temporary shelter from these storms. Either way, if the winner isn’t ready to use government for a generational project of rebuilding our aging policy scaffolding, expect their celebration to be short-lived.

Canadians understand we are being wrong-footed by the forces of Big Tech, Energy Transition and Dueling Superpowers. Earlier this summer, Abacus Research reported that respondents believe by a staggering four-to-one margin the world is heading in the wrong direction. Just last week, Ipsos reported that 52 per cent of Canadian believe “society is broken,” up 15 points over three years. In both cases, fewer than one in five are optimistic. Most people seem to feel we’re losing control over the future.

Groups launch petition to push for Hong Kong to become Canadian federal election issue

Groups launch petition to push for Hong Kong to become Canadian federal election issue A group of Hong Kongers are banding together in the hope of making the situation in that city a federal election issue here in Canada. Gloria Fung, president of non-profit organization Canada-Hong Kong Link, is among those behind a new e-petition campaign to raise awareness among Canadians about the unrest with many fearing a tightening grip by China over the semi-autonomous region. "We have 300,000 Canadians in Hong Kong therefore whatever is going on in Hong Kong will also have a serious impact on Canadians living, working or even transiting there," Fund told CBC Toronto.

"Following this election , we expect that will finally change." The cost of living has been identified as a priority in this campaign and all the federal parties are rolling out policies aimed at making life more affordable for Canadian families, from tax relief to making it easier for first-time homebuyers to get into

In our eyes, these are the firm’s future leaders, so it made sense to focus our initial reforms there. Our structured interview questions are designed to assess candidates on 10 core competencies, including analytical thinking and integrity, which we know correlate with long-term success at the firm.

Case in point: the rules around Big Tech and its impacts on the future of work, the health of democracy and the distribution of income. Our policy basics — including tax, foreign investment and competition policies — no longer do the job for an economy in which intellectual property and data are more valuable than physical assets. In the 2015 election, Stephen Harper tried to trap Justin Trudeau by vowing to never charge a “Netflix tax.” Trudeau dodged by agreeing.

Now Canada is stuck with the inanity of sales taxes being waived for foreign digital providers like Facebook, Netflix and nyt.com while being levied on Canadian services, tilting the field against domestic competitors.

Today, 13 of the top 20 news sites in Canada are foreign and the New York Times, with a handful of reporters in Canada, is believed to be roughly on par in digital subscriptions with The Globe and Mail. Not good for our own civic culture. Whoever wins will need to get on top of these matters.

Federal Liberals announce pay equity commissioner on eve of election call

Federal Liberals announce pay equity commissioner on eve of election call OTTAWA — The Liberal government has announced Canada's first-ever federal pay equity commissioner on the eve of the expected election call. Employment Minister Patty Hajdu says Karen Jensen will provide direction for the administration and enforcement of the new Pay Equity Act. A government release says Jensen is an experienced litigator who has represented clients in human rights, constitutional, administrative and labour law cases for more

This does not count the people whose tests are in process. And as you see this curve is going, it will continue to rise dramatically over the next period of time. His goal, he said in a statement Saturday night, is to ensure senators could review it before a procedural vote Sunday that would allow the

We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey. Currently, I try my best to release one video every week.

Perhaps even more urgent is managing climate and energy policies that lower emissions without inducing the kind of backlash we’ve see in recent months — forget Alberta — to spiking gasoline prices in British Columbia. An energy transition isn’t going to take unless economic and political demands are aligned. Successive governments have struggled. A new consensus must be forged.

Then there is our place in the world. Canadians are rightly proud of their country’s outsized role in helping create global rules and institutions, from NATO and the World Bank to the Law of the Sea treaty and nuclear non-proliferation. Now we need to rethink the role of a middle power adjacent to the United States within an international order dominated by a pair of superpowers antagonistic to one another and seemingly indifferent to most everyone else.

Our exports, the lifeblood of a trading nation, are increasingly subject to whim, side-swiping everyone from canola producers to steelmakers to universities and colleges. Canada needs to get back to the drafting table and work with like-minded nations to help Great Powers manage their rivalries, as during the Cold War, and liberate the rest of us from arbitrary measures.

Liberal election plane damaged in Victoria after media bus drives under wing

Liberal election plane damaged in Victoria after media bus drives under wing VICTORIA — Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau's election plane sustained some damage in Victoria after a media bus drove under one of its wings Wednesday night. The plane had just landed in the British Columbia capital after transporting Trudeau, his team and several journalists travelling with the campaign across the country for Day 1 of the federal election race. A bus was parked close to the plane to transport the journalists from the tarmac. As it departed, it drove under the wing of the plane, making a loud scraping sound as the top of the bus slowly dragged under the wing. Trudeau has a busy flight schedule planned for Thursday with stops in Kamloops, B.C.

These are tricky times for Canada. We have hostages in China and waning influence in the U.S., on which we depend for 75 per cent of our exports. Everyone knows we need to diversify — the international trade minister now even has the word diversification in his title. These are serious issues. So where is the political discussion about what it would take to bring our reliance to a more reasonable 50-50 by, say, 2050?

Canada has historically been a shaper of its future. Once the targeting of messages at particular subsets of the voting public is complete, whoever wins will then need to form strategies that further our interests. People are nervous and won’t remain passive if they sense insufficient attention to the big things intruding in their lives. Canadians being Canadians, the good news is they would prefer peaceful, orderly, good government solutions to the angry politics prevalent elsewhere.

In a study on the future of work for the Public Policy Forum earlier this summer, University of Toronto political scientist Peter Loewen probed the attitudes of the most economically anxious among us. They are clearly tempted by anti-system populist and nativist arguments. But mostly they just want good policy.

Given a list of possible actions, their top three were incentives for employers to retrain, greater spending on science and technology education, and special adjustment programs for older workers. Reducing immigration came well down the list.

The message: we’re giving government a chance to respond to our concerns. Don’t drop the ball. Or else.

Edward Greenspon is president and CEO of the Public Policy Forum.

Read more

Federal government posts $14B shortfall in 2018-19.
OTTAWA — The federal government ran a $14-billion deficit in 2018-19, according to its latest annual financial report, the third year in a row with a shortfall bigger than $10 billion. The deficit for the fiscal year that ended March 31 was $900 million smaller than the government projected in last spring's federal budget, however. Revenues in 2018-19 expanded by $21 billion — or 6.7 per cent — compared to the previous year, said the report released Tuesday. The government's revenue ratio, which is total revenues as a percentage of the size of the economy, increased last year by 15 per cent to reach its highest level since before the financial crisis in 2007-08.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!