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CanadaWinnipeg police will use FaceTime to investigate break-ins

20:11  13 september  2019
20:11  13 september  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Bank accidentally puts $120,000 in couple’s account. They were arrested after spending it, police say.

Bank accidentally puts $120,000 in couple’s account. They were arrested after spending it, police say. Authorities say they bought a racecar and a camper and gave thousands to friends.

The Winnipeg Police Service is launching a pilot project that will let officers connect with victims of break-ins through online video platforms like FaceTime and Google Duo.

The technology will allow police to do a virtual walk-through of the scene to determine whether additional resources, such as investigative and forensic officers, should be sent out.

The WPS believes it is the first police agency in North America — and perhaps the world — to test such a system.

A demonstration can be viewed here.

Police hope to reduce response times for such crimes, noting there are more than 6,000 break-and-enters in the city every year.

Man holds knife to child’s neck during robbery, say Winnipeg police

Man holds knife to child’s neck during robbery, say Winnipeg police A Winnipeg man has been arrested for several robberies in early September, including one where he allegedly held a knife to a child's neck before stealing cash. The robbery spree started Sept. 3 at about 10:15 p.m. said Winnipeg police, when a man, 50, met another man about an iPhone for sale. The pair met outside a business on McGee street and the buyer brought his 9-year-old child along. The seller whipped out a knife, grabbed the kid and held the knife to the child's neck, said police. He received $100 cash and ran away. The child wasn't hurt. The next day at about 8 p.m.

Winnipeg police will use FaceTime to investigate break-ins © Winnipeg Police Service/YouTube Police will connect with victims of break-ins through an online video platform and have the person do a walk-through of the scene.

When someone phones in to report a break-in, the officer will ask the caller to consent to a real-time video assessment. If consent is granted, officers will connect via mobile device with the victim, who will walk through the scene.

Police want the public to know the reporting person is under no obligation to consent to a virtual assessment and the video will not be recorded or retained in any way.

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