Canada: Five Eyes allies raising questions as damage control continues in Cameron Ortis case: sources - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

CanadaFive Eyes allies raising questions as damage control continues in Cameron Ortis case: sources

07:35  15 september  2019
07:35  15 september  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

RCMP surveying potential damage in wake of charges against top intelligence official

RCMP surveying potential damage in wake of charges against top intelligence official RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki says the force is still trying to understand the fallout of allegations levelled against one of their top intelligence officials and that RCMP officers are "shaken" by the charges.

The Five Eyes , often abbreviated as FVEY, is an anglophone intelligence alliance comprising Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The terms " Five Eyes ", "Nine Eyes", and "14 Eyes" often appear when discussing privacy tools. This guide will explain everything you need to know. As awareness of global surveillance grows, more people are looking for information about the Five Eyes , Nine Eyes, and 14 Eyes surveillance alliances.

Five Eyes allies raising questions as damage control continues in Cameron Ortis case: sources Members of the Five Eyes intelligence bloc are already raising questions about the type of information accessible to Cameron Ortis as the director of an intelligence unit within the RCMP, diplomatic sources tell CBC News.

The Five Eyes, made up of Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia, is one of the world's leading intelligence-sharing networks, linking some of the most powerful countries in the world.

Diplomatic sources speaking to CBC on condition of anonymity said the alliance is worried that Ortis, charged under Canada's national secrets act, had access to their allied information.

RCMP director accused of stealing secrets had access to allied intelligence

RCMP director accused of stealing secrets had access to allied intelligence OTTAWA—The high-ranking RCMP employee accused of stealing secrets had access to an extensive trove of intelligence from both Canadian and international sources. RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki confirmed Monday that Cameron Ortis, the director of the force’s National Intelligence Coordination Centre, had access to information shared by international partners as well as intelligence gathered by Canadian agencies. Lucki said Ortis’ arrest has “shaken many people throughout the RCMP.” “We are aware of the potential risk to agency operations of our partners in Canada and abroad and we thank them for their continued collaboration.

Cameron Ortis faces a total of seven charges, including five federal secrecy charges, for alleged Another senior source said Ortis started off in the national security program working in the area of Canada is part of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing network with United States, Britain, New Zealand

David Cameron said he would look at the report but insisted Britain had one of the strictest set of rules governing arms sales almost anywhere in the world, adding that the UK was not directly involved in the Saudi-led airstrikes.

Ortis — a 47-year-old senior intelligence official at the RCMP —  was arrested Thursday and appeared in an Ottawa court Friday, facing five counts under the Security of Information Act. He's also been charged with two Criminal Code violations.

The rarely invoked Security of Information Act was created to make sure operatives who know Canada's top secrets keep them secret.

Ortis is accused of communicating special operational information back in 2015 and faces a slew of charges related to preparing, in the past year, to share either safeguarded or operational information with a foreign entity or terrorist group.

Little is known about what information he was gathering and to whom he allegedly was preparing to pass it, but sources who knew of Ortis's work said he likely had access to Mountie operations, intelligence dossiers and information from Canada's allies.

Ortis arrest 'unsettling,' top Mountie says amid damage assessment

Ortis arrest 'unsettling,' top Mountie says amid damage assessment Ortis arrest 'unsettling,' top Mountie says amid damage assessment

The Nine Eyes and Fourteen Eyes Alliances are essentially extensions of the original Five Eyes Alliance. As comforting as this story is, there are also known cases of VPN providers claiming to have a no-logs policy who then gave out users’ sensitive information to government authorities.

Title: Damage Control Series: Hold My Coffee Series Order: 7 Author: Keira Marcos Betas: Ladyholder & Jilly James Fandom: Stargate: Atlantis Relationship: Meredith McKay/John “I’ve read their files and prepped questions for them—what’s there to discuss?” Meredith asked as her gaze narrowed.

Allies waiting for details of Ortis case

Diplomatic sources said the Five Eyes alliance is waiting for a formal damage assessment from the public safety minister's office, and said some members are already questioning how Ortis was able to hoard information within the RCMP.

"There's really no overstating what he could have had access to. The devil is in the details on what he actually took," said former CSIS analyst Jessica Davis.

"This could range from somewhat injurious to seriously detrimental to our national security and the partnerships we have with our allies."

The alliance isn't in full panic mode, sources say, since the charge sheet suggests Ortis was stopped before he actually shared information.

However, a government source who was briefed on the Ortis case said Canadian officials are worried because he was known as "the China expert."

Motivation a key question

The case has thrown Ottawa and Canada's security and government circles into a tizzy as officials try to figure out what Ortis's motive was and to whom he was talking.

Secrets in hands of alleged RCMP spy would cause 'devastating' damage to Canada, allies: documents

Secrets in hands of alleged RCMP spy would cause 'devastating' damage to Canada, allies: documents The cache of classified intelligence material an RCMP official was allegedly preparing to share with a foreign entity or terrorist organization is so vital to Canada's national security that the country's intelligence agencies say its misuse strikes at the heart of Canada's sovereignty and security, documents seen by CBC News reveal.

Cameron Ortis — a civilian director general at the RCMP — faces three charges and multiple counts of the A source tells CBC News that because Ortis 's work was so central to national security, federal departments Raised on the campaign trail. The RCMP won't say if Ortis is still employed by them.

The " Five Eyes " (FVEY) refers to an alliance comprising Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. These countries are bound by the multilateral UKUSA Agreement for

An initial search of property and bankruptcy records doesn't suggest Ortis had any financial troubles

A source told CBC News that because Ortis's work was so central to national security, federal departments across government are now running in-house damage assessments to get a sense of the ramifications.

That scouring has even been extended to people in retirement, meaning investigators are going back years to assess the damage.

Until now, the most high-profile use of the Security of Information Act was the case of navy-officer-turned-spy Jeffrey Delisle back in 2012.

In a case out of a bargain-bin spy novel, the former sub-lieutenant pleaded guilty to selling secrets about Canada and its allies to Russia after his marriage crumbled.

Distraught after his wife cheated on him, Delisle walked into the Russian embassy in Ottawa, and offered to sell top-secret classified information for $10,000 US.

For nearly five years he smuggled information from of a Halifax base via USB memory stick until he was finally caught.

Read more

Canada bids to reassure U.S., other allies after intelligence official arrested.
Canada bids to reassure U.S., other allies after intelligence official arrested

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 793
This is interesting!