Canada: Elizabeth May seeks to blow past political pack with platform roll out - PressFrom - Canada
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CanadaElizabeth May seeks to blow past political pack with platform roll out

03:45  17 september  2019
03:45  17 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

House of Commons cuts links to MPs websites

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The path to the American Dream may be lined with crowdfunding. You do pay fees to the platform and credit card company as well as paying marketing expenses. They asked for feedback on stories that might be included in the book. The weekly mailing turned into a customer discovery tool and a

Elizabeth Warren has responded to Donald Trump’s latest “Pocahontas” jibe by highlighting the use it as a chance to lift up their stories. “I’m going to do that right now by pointing out that more than half of Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire

Elizabeth May seeks to blow past political pack with platform roll out© Provided by Canadian Press Enterprises Inc

OTTAWA — Green Leader Elizabeth May pushed past the political pack Monday by introducing a wide-ranging set of new policy promises while her rivals were recycling or expanding on old ideas.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer re-introduced tax credits from the Harper government era, and Justin Trudeau pledged funds for more child-care spaces despite only days ago suggesting that was something provinces alone need to tackle.

May said politics-as-usual is leading the country down a path Canada simply cannot survive.

It is time for the kind of big ideas that Canada hasn't seen since the 1950s, and ones that take into account climate change as being the major crisis of our time, she said.

Elizabeth May seeks to blow past political pack with platform rollout

Elizabeth May seeks to blow past political pack with platform rollout OTTAWA — Green Leader Elizabeth May pushed past the political pack Monday by introducing a wide-ranging set of new policy promises while her rivals were recycling or expanding on old ideas. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer re-introduced tax credits from the Harper government era, and Justin Trudeau pledged funds for more child-care spaces despite only days ago suggesting that was something provinces alone need to tackle. May said politics-as-usual is leading the country down a path Canada simply cannot survive.

Elizabeth Simas, political scientist at the University of Houston Leah Wright Rigueur, public policy professor at Harvard. Platform proposals may got shot down, or be included on the platform and later ignored. But just by being aired, they can gain currency and support among lawmakers.

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"I believe that what Canadians really want is peace, order and green government," May said in Toronto.

The Green platform, in addition to aggressive targets for emissions reductions and environmental measures such as a ban on hydraulic fracking, also pledges universal pharmacare, the elimination of tuition fees for post-secondary education, a closer relationship with Indigenous Peoples and the elimination of poverty via a guaranteed livable income.

The cost of it all will be released in the coming days, but the benefits will be worth the price, May promised.

"It is a good deal to save all of humanity in the next five years," she said.

New Democrats sought to take some of the wind out of May's sails by announcing they'd poached Eric Ferland, the former leader of the Green party in Quebec, as a candidate in the very same Montreal-area riding whose incumbent is Pierre Nantel — a former NDP MP running for re-election as a Green.

Elizabeth May's history troubles

Elizabeth May's history troubles Elizabeth May's history troubles

Federal Green Party Leader Elizabeth May suggested it is the NDP that the Greens should be working with, listing their common positions on matters ranging Andrew Weaver, the BC Green Leader, told reporters on Wednesday he will review the Liberal and NDP platforms with his new caucus to figure

Policies of past Democratic platforms have sought to protect social programs, labor unions, consumer protection and workplace safety The 2016 Democratic Party Platform declares: "We are committed to addressing the extraordinary challenges faced by our fellow citizens in Puerto Rico.

The Greens and the NDP have appeared locked in a battle for third place since well before the start of the campaign.

But both NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and May insisted Monday they're not running against each other.

"Our focus is on replacing the Trudeau government," said Singh, in Quebec.

May said while she thinks she's best qualified to be prime minister, she also suggested she's got her eye on a different prize: electing enough Green MPs to have a role in a potential minority government.

Under the Liberal-led minority government of Lester B. Pearson, Canadians got universal health care, the Canada Pension Plan, even a national flag, May pointed out.

"This is, for me, a model of how Parliament should work but we have not had anything equally bold in more than 50 years," she said.

"So here we are, saying it's time."

One of the places the Greens are hoping to elect a candidate is the Ontario riding of Guelph, which sent a Green to the Ontario legislature in the last provincial election. May headed there after her platform launch on Monday.

Trudeau seeks to one-up Conservatives with plan on maternity, parental benefits

Trudeau seeks to one-up Conservatives with plan on maternity, parental benefits Trudeau seeks to one-up Conservatives with plan on maternity, parental benefits

Preference Falsifiers and Political Ringleaders. Discussion, it turns out , led individuals to become more extreme in their views. Though these platforms were originally designed to bring people together, it is common to see social media users separate into two isolated communities, liberals and

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Trudeau was campaigning nearby, in the southwestern Ontario cities of Waterloo, London and Windsor.

It was in Waterloo that Trudeau promised $535 million per year to create more before- and after-school child-care spaces and cut fees for parents — a program that would require getting the provinces onside, a detail that didn't stop him from demonizing the conservative governments running several of them.

Trudeau is wading into waters that earlier this month he said he would avoid: he told the Toronto Star that provinces were best placed to figure out what child-care services were needed in their jurisdictions and how to deliver them.

He reframed the issue Monday, arguing the funds were about families and blaming conservatives for promising help but cutting services.

"I always think that's a role for the federal government, to make sure that we are investing families and supporting them," Trudeau said.

He ended the day in Windsor, the heart of Canada's auto industry, where he lauded his government for standing up to U.S. President Donald Trump  during renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement and emerging with "a win for Canada."

Conservatives accuse Liberals of keeping Canadians in dark on cost of promises

Conservatives accuse Liberals of keeping Canadians in dark on cost of promises The Conservatives are accusing the Liberals of trying to hide the cost of their campaign promises from Canadians. Canada's budget watchdog has a mandate to cost out election promises, but one week into the campaign only the NDP and the Conservative Party have had their policy proposals analyzed by the Parliamentary Budget Office and publicly released. PBO results for six Conservative promises and two NDP commitments have been posted on the PBO's website, but none have been published from the Liberals, the Greens or the other parties.

Jack Layton Michael Ignatieff Stephen Harper Elizabeth May Gilles Duceppe. Now, let me just talk just a second about the Family Pack and its relevance to Northern Ontario. Instead, they’re directed by the spin doctors and the somewhat sociopathic elite in every political party that run every campaign.

There are many and diverse political parties in the Philippines. Most party membership consists primarily of political figures and leaders, with little or no grassroots membership.

Trudeau took questions from reporters for the first time since Friday. Conservatives had jumped on Trudeau's apparent avoidance of the media by pointing out that their former leader, Stephen Harper, had been lambasted when he took only five questions a day in campaigns past.

But it was again Scheer who drew comparisons to Harper.

At an event in B.C., he promised to bring back two tax credits that had been marquee policies under Harper's Conservative government, measures that allowed Canadian families to claim credits for expenses related to their families' fitness- or sports-related activities and for arts and educational expenses.

It was the latest reboot of a past Harper policy; last week, Scheer promised to bring back a tax credit for transit passes. All three had been axed by the Liberals.

"I can assure you that throughout the rest of this campaign we will be proposing new ideas to leave more money in the pockets of Canadians," he said.

After a couple of days of campaigning in rival-held ridings, Scheer was off to the friendlier territory of Calgary later Monday, a stop sure to provide an energy boost to a tour dogged by questions about potentially controversial candidates.

Also receiving a boost of energy Monday was Maxime Bernier. He's been told his year-old People's Party of Canada will be given a spot at the officially sanctioned leaders debates in October, after making the case his party does have a reasonable chance at winning multiple seats.

"That was the right decision," Bernier said.

Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

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Elizabeth May was holding disposable cup in photoshopped image, contrary to party's claims .
OTTAWA — Green Party leader Elizabeth May was holding a disposable coffee cup in a photo on the party’s website that was later altered to show her holding a reusable cup with a metal straw, contrary to her party’s earlier claims. A party spokesperson previously told the National Post that May had been holding a reusable cup, and the image had been photoshopped simply to include another reusable cup, one bearing the Green Party logo. At the time, the spokesperson said the party was unable to provide the Post with a copy of the original photo. But the Post has obtained the original photo from internet archives, which shows May holding a single-use, disposable cup.

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