•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Dinner table politics: Toronto mom launches 'CoVote' to let teens have say in election

13:50  09 october  2019
13:50  09 october  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

The Afghanistan war vet who could take down a Liberal heavyweight

  The Afghanistan war vet who could take down a Liberal heavyweight Election Image of the Day: Ottawa battled Capt. Kimberly Fawcett to avoid paying for her prosthetic leg. Now she's running against the incumbent who failed to answer her pleas for help.Days later, she signed up to run in this fall’s election against a man she claims ignored her pleas for help: Liberal MP Bill Blair. Fawcett, pictured above with Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, has served two tours in Afghanistan—one before the crash, and one after it—making the combat engineer an outsize candidate in a riding that has never elected a Tory MP.

Bell said CoVote is based on the idea that intergenerational talks will enable people too young to vote to have some say in the Oct. 21 federal election . The idea is that older people, such as parents and grandparents, could discuss federal issues that matter with younger people, namely teens , then

Bell said CoVote is based on the idea that intergenerational talks will enable people too young to vote to have some say in the Oct. Victoria Bell and Piper Boyd Bell like to talk politics with their family at the dinner table . Victoria came up with the idea of ‘ CoVote ’, a campaign to include young people in

a group of people looking at a sign: Adlyn Gilbert, 13, belts out a chant at the Global Climate Strike in Toronto. 'I’m here to fight for my future, for the future,' she says.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Adlyn Gilbert, 13, belts out a chant at the Global Climate Strike in Toronto. 'I’m here to fight for my future, for the future,' she says. A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to include teenage children in voting decisions made by their parents and grandparents.

Victoria Bell, an entrepreneur, says she hopes her non-partisan campaign, entitled CoVote, will lead to more informed voting about climate change.

Bell said CoVote is based on the idea that intergenerational talks will enable people too young to vote to have some say in the Oct. 21 federal election. The idea is that older people, such as parents and grandparents, could discuss federal issues that matter with younger people, namely teens, then make a voting decision together. Climate change would be front-and-centre in that decision, she said.

NewsAlert: Three former St. Mike's students plead guilty to assault, sex assault

  NewsAlert: Three former St. Mike's students plead guilty to assault, sex assault TORONTO — Three former students of a prestigious Toronto private school have pleaded guilty in a sex assault scandal that rocked the institution. The teens, who attended St. Michael's College School, each pleaded guilty to one count of sex assault with a weapon and one count of assault with a weapon. One of the teens also pleaded guilty to making child pornography. Police launched an investigation last fall after a video that captured an allegedThe teens, who attended St. Michael's College School, each pleaded guilty to one count of sex assault with a weapon and one count of assault with a weapon.

Dinner table politics : Toronto mom launches ' CoVote ' to let teens have say in election . A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to include teenage children in voting decisions made by their parents and grandparents.

A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to Victoria Bell, an entrepreneur, says she hopes her non-partisan campaign, entitled CoVote , will lead In elections past, parties sought to capture Canadians’ imaginations with a vision of what the future

"CoVote is simple idea," Bell told CBC Radio's Metro Morning recently. "The idea is that voting age adults have a conversation with someone who is not yet of legal age to talk to them about what the impact of their choice is on the young person and to make a commitment to vote in that way that protects that young person's future vis-a-vis the climate."

Climate change is considered to be one of the top issues in this election.

On Sept. 27, thousands gathered at Queen's Park, the seat of Ontario's legislature, as part of Toronto's climate strike action. Protesters, many of whom were teens, demanded immediate government action to address climate change.

The CoVote campaign is being promoted through a website, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

'You are a phony and a fraud': Scheer rips into Trudeau in his opening remarks at debate

  'You are a phony and a fraud': Scheer rips into Trudeau in his opening remarks at debate With just two weeks until election day and polls showing the Liberals and Conservatives locked in a dead heat , tonight’s English-language debate could be the last chance for the leaders to make a big impression on Canadians. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau will have to speak up, though, because they’ll be just two voices on a crowded stage. Read all of the National Post's election coverage Tonight’s debate, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau will have to speak up, though, because they’ll be just two voices on a crow

TORONTO — The warning signalling a mass casualty situation blares out from the overhead speakers in the emergency department at St. Michael's Hospital minutes before the first patient shuffles in with Dinner table politics : Toronto mom launches ' CoVote ' to let teens have say in election .

Masse has won eight elections in a row in Windsor, Ont.—two for city council and the rest for the federal A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to Victoria Bell, an entrepreneur, says she hopes her non-partisan campaign, entitled CoVote , will

Idea arose from conversation at family gathering

Bell says the idea for the campaign came out of a dinner table conversation at a family gathering last year during the Ontario provincial election. Her father, in his 80s, discussed the election with one of her daughters, Lily, then 17. Her dad said he didn't want to vote because he believes all politicians are crooks and her daughter, desperate to vote, asked if he could vote for her.

"A little bell went off in my head and I thought, 'There's something in that,'" she said.

"Ballots are secret so I have no idea what they actually conspired to do. It did occur to me that if I really listened to non-voting age teens and people I cared about in my life, it would make a difference about how I voted. I wanted to create an opportunity for those conversations to happen between older voters and younger people who are feeling disenfranchised."

Liberals, NDP Offer Advice For Inevitable Family Thanksgiving Election Chat

  Liberals, NDP Offer Advice For Inevitable Family Thanksgiving Election Chat As you prepare for your Thanksgiving dinner, if you have some time off from basting your turkey and taste-testing the mashed potatoes and arranging your decorative gourds, why not prepare some political talking points? That’s what the Liberals and the NDP are hoping you’ll do. Both parties have released suggestions for what to say when dinner conversation inevitably turns to the election. The sustained time with extended family, combined with the vast quantities of alcohol that are often part of holiday dinner, means it’s not unusual for conversation to drift into politics.

A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to include teenage children in voting decisions made by their parents and grandparents. Victoria Bell, an entrepreneur, says she hopes her non-partisan campaign, entitled CoVote , will lead to more informed

Dinner table politics : Toronto mom launches ' CoVote ' to let teens have say in election . A Toronto mother is encouraging families to talk about politics at the dinner table as a way to include teenage children in voting decisions made by their parents and grandparents .

Bell said CoVote is not telling people how to vote but simply to talk to each other.

'I'm certainly not here to tell you how to vote'

"I'm certainly not here to tell you how to vote," she said. "The decisions that we make on the 21st will have a long term impact on the young people in our lives. And I think we have a responsibility and an opportunity to share that impact with them."

a couple of people posing for the camera: Victoria Bell poses with her daughter Piper Boyd Bell. Victoria Bell has launched a new online campaign, CoVote, to include teens in the upcoming federal election.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Victoria Bell poses with her daughter Piper Boyd Bell. Victoria Bell has launched a new online campaign, CoVote, to include teens in the upcoming federal election.

Piper Boyd Bell, 15, a Grade 10 student in Toronto and one of Bell's two daughters, told Metro Morning that she fully supports the campaign. She said her family does discuss politics at the dinner table and it values family dinners. Family members will share what they have learned on the news that day, she added.

"I thought it was really interesting. Right now, the social climate around politics is shifting more toward the younger generation as we get more involved. I think that's a really healthy and important thing. At the end of the day, it is our future. It is the world that we are going to be living in when we grow up," she said.

Piper says members of the younger generation are learning in school about climate change and are very concerned about the lack of action. She said the voting age should be lowered.

In the campaign, members of the older and younger generations are asked to take a photo together and post it on the CoVote's Instagram account.

Obama isn't interfering in Canada's election, but why did he speak up at all? .
Analysis Barack Obama’s surprise endorsement of Justin Trudeau Wednesday wasn’t illegal, not outside the farthest reaches of a far right fantasyland. It wasn’t election interference, either, not in the way the term has come to be used since the last U.S. campaign. To compare Obama, a private citizen, expressing his views on the politics of another country, to the massive, coordinated campaign of misinformation, voter suppression, hacking and leaks undertaken by Vladimir Putin’s Russia in 2016 would be cynical, stupid or just outright delusional. There is no credible comparison.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!