Canada: Heather Mallick: Alberta, Ontario vote against common sense in favour of a dangerous doctrine - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada Heather Mallick: Alberta, Ontario vote against common sense in favour of a dangerous doctrine

13:30  14 october  2019
13:30  14 october  2019 Source:   thestar.com

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"A Defence of Common Sense " is a 1925 essay by philosopher G. E. Moore. In it, he attempts to refute absolute skepticism (or nihilism) by arguing that at least some of our established beliefs - facts - about the world are absolutely certain. Moore argues that these beliefs are common sense .

Those who voted against were Senators Rónán Mullen, Jim Walsh and Feargal Quinn; the However, some religious-affiliated groups were in favour of the referendum. "The church must take account of this reality, but in the sense that it must strengthen its commitment to evangelisation.

Jason Kenney et al. sitting on a bench in a suit and tie: Ontario Premier Doug Ford, right, poses with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney at the Ontario Legislature in Toronto on May 3.© Chris Young Ontario Premier Doug Ford, right, poses with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney at the Ontario Legislature in Toronto on May 3.

(Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.)

“Spare us from government oversight of meticulous truck driver training and licensing!” Crash victims do not cry this out as they sit in their own blood in the eerie silence post-smash on the flat highways of the West.

“No taxpayer dollars for me,” they don’t tell horrified police officers wet with the surrounding carnage. The injured just beg for help, sometimes mutely with their eyes.

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James Chalmers penned a scathing polemic against Common Sense titled Plain Truth. In his own pamphlet, Chalmers ridiculed Paine’s presumptuousness in overly educated biology teachers, who wished to expose their students to the theory of Darwinian evolution. Though the verdict in favor of

Israelis voted on Tuesday to kill the prospect of peace. Out of 34 factions contesting election, voters chose right wing parties advocating land annexation Protesting against illegal land theft should not be limited to boycotting negotiations and oral condemnations. In the absence of a viable, independent

But eccentric Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, chief doctrinaire of the province’s United Conservative Party, will swear these are the wails he heard. Strange that other premiers didn’t. Kenney has decided to revert to old trucking rules, which may make accidents again more likely.

After the 2018 Humboldt bus crash in Saskatchewan — an inexperienced driver crashed a semi into a bus carrying a hockey team, killing 16 people and injuring 13 — provincial governments tried to prevent such a crash happening again.

The young truck driver had been new. The small trucking company had been indifferent to federal and provincial safety rules, ignoring and faking paperwork. The driver, heartbroken by the accident he caused, was sentenced to eight years in jail. The company owner didn’t even show up in court for his $5,000 fine.

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Heather Mallick : Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper is our version of George W Bush It doesn't win votes to say you want to de-Canadianise Canada, long known as a bastion of free The Conservatives have now said they will end this rule, which until now worked massively in their favour .

22 Republican senators voted against reauthorizing the law Tuesday. Assuming they don't favor Surely Republicans, whatever you may think of them, are not actually in favor of violence against These policies were intended to combat the too- common situation in which a victim is intimidated into

It could all have been so different.

The new post-Humboldt rules about safety in the trucking industry required $10,000 in fees for more training (113 hours) and better testing for licence applicants. Ironically, the Globe and Mail recently revealed the situation had been worse than imagined. For years, many small fly-by-night companies, particularly in B.C., had been luring ill-trained temporary foreign workers to Canada to drive semi-trailers for low pay and long hours without rest. What could go wrong?

The new Alberta rules were sensible, but also compassionate, offering some reassurance to the bereft families about future safety. In fact, the Humboldt families had asked Kenney not to reverse the new rules.

Kenney ignored them, an act that was not just reprehensible but in bad taste. What kind of man would apply pepper to their wounds?

Kenney and his true believers — tangled are they in red tape — did it anyway. They have allowed exemptions that let some new drivers slip out of training, even retroactively, freeing farm truckers and school bus drivers from the training and testing. They would go back to the old system — it worked for the “last 30, 40 years,” the transport minister said — partly to ease short truck trips (when accidents presumably don’t happen.)

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Vote Against . You can’t lose if you don’t play. Economists have long been puzzled by the phenomenon of people participating in lotteries. If you live in a country where it is already common knowledge that voting is a sham, please enjoy this post as an opportunity to laugh at Westerners and our delusions.

But people need to exercise their common sense , too. Alas, the proliferation of rules is making that And although the legal system is supposed to be neutral, the scales are tilted in favour of whoever is in the When Mr Obama was in the Senate, he once voted for a mild curb on jurisdiction-shopping by

For Kenney and his kind, doctrine is religion. All red tape is the same: bad. Facts are suspect. “Red tape makes government bigger and opportunity smaller,” Kenney’s government says flatly, asking voters to suggest government rules to cut.

His callout website is positively manic. It’s like a store closing sale. All rules 30 per cent off! It suggests cutting safety codes, safety code exams, audits, inspections, building licensing, appeal boards, liquor bans in campsites, and extra pay for overtime.

If the safety of schoolkids is the ketchup on the uninspected meat in one’s burger, what’s the matter with Alberta? What’s the matter with Kansas, or the U.S. red states? Why do voters knowingly damage their own interests to follow the Trumpish ultra-conservative libertarian dream of non-existent self-sufficiency?

Canada is an organized country, a rules-based nation. By electing Kenney, at the absurd end of the extreme right — just as Ontario did with Doug Ford — they voted against common sense, choosing a failed doctrine involving bootstraps, whatever they are, which must be pulled on personally, never en masse.

As Ontario has learned, it’s expensive to elect doctrinaires. They don’t do inventive things, they just flip everything the previous government did, out of spite.

Successive governments become serial flippers. Alberta is flipping back to chaos. I can’t quite follow why Kenney might change the rules at the Alberta Boilers Safety Association but if it’s anything like highway safety, I wish Alberta’s boilers well.

Canadian voters are not doctrinaire. If they were, they would enjoy paying extra to airlines for flying with luggage and sitting in squeezy/less squeezy seats. Instead they complain. There should be rules, they say. But not in Alberta and Ontario, not for the next few years.

Heather Mallick is a columnist based in Toronto covering current affairs. Follow her on Twitter: @HeatherMallick

Matt Gurney: Some good news for the west — you have more friends out east than you realize .
In the aftermath of this Monday’s vote, there is intense focus on feelings — justified, in many cases — of western Canadian alienation. Talk of “wexit” and a failed federation are rife. Alberta premier Jason Kenney and Manitoba premier Brian Pallister both defended Canadian unity in comments to the press on Tuesday. That was encouraging — I’m glad they did. The fact that they had to, though, is alarming. Western separatism is a bad idea. But human history is full of examples of bad ideas getting taken out for a spin, particularly when those bad ideas are rooted in a sense of grievance, real or imagined.

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This is interesting!