Canada: Why is this tree cheating on Elizabeth May and the Greens? - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada Why is this tree cheating on Elizabeth May and the Greens?

22:50  18 october  2019
22:50  18 october  2019 Source:   macleans.ca

Green Leader Elizabeth May predicts minority government, warns against majority

  Green Leader Elizabeth May predicts minority government, warns against majority VICTORIA — Green Leader Elizabeth May says it appears Canadians are about to elect a minority government, which could make the environment the biggest winner. Minority Parliaments force parties to work together and the Greens can play leading roles in implementing environmental policies that fight climate change, she said Wednesday. "The point is right now we're looking at a minority Parliament," May said. "What you want is members of Parliament who know how to co-operate across party lines and deliver good results. A minority Parliament gives us the opportunity to actually deliver on what is needed.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

a man riding on top of a tree: (Nathan Denette/CP)© Used with permission of / © St. Joseph Communications. (Nathan Denette/CP)

Since the writ dropped on Sept. 11, Canada’s progressive vote has been Jagmeet Singh’s to lose. The man won the NDP leadership with resounding momentum, sweeping every other candidate with a majority on the first ballot. But then what? He publicly faltered on foreign policy. He took flak for his wardrobe of bespoke suits. He seemed unsure about his own party’s stance on gun control. On racial and immigration issues, however, Singh has shone tremendously, especially after Justin Trudeau’s blackface scandal and numerous videos shot of white people saying racist things at him. As Trudeau sheds votes, the NDP has been gaining. A month ago, pundits would have told you the NDP was toast, and the Greens were the flashy new progressive choice; now, as the Greens slink back in the polls, Singh is spending the final days of his campaign in their back yard, travelling across Vancouver Island and hugging every man, woman and tree he meets. And why not? The man won’t become Prime Minister next week, but he’s still got something to celebrate.

Green Leader Elizabeth May promises electoral reform, lowering voting age to 16

  Green Leader Elizabeth May promises electoral reform, lowering voting age to 16 VANCOUVER — Green Leader Elizabeth May says if her party is elected Monday, it will be the last federal government in Canada chosen by the first-past-the-post system. In a release, May says a Green government would launch a citizens' assembly with a mandate to make recommendations to Parliament on a new electoral system based on proportional representation. The Greens also say they will lower the voting age to 16. The Liberals included electoral reform as part of their platform for the 2015 election, but dropped the idea shortly after winning a majority mandate.

Check Macleans.ca every weekday of the election, as writer Michael Fraiman dissects an image that tells a story from the campaign.

MORE ABOUT ELECTION IMAGE OF THE DAY:

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  • For the Tories, Peter MacKay is more than just a face in the crowd
  • Pamela Anderson dips her spoon into the federal election campaign

Green leader adamant 'climate referendum' not lost in election results .
VICTORIA — Just because the federal Green party won only a few seats in the general election, it doesn’t mean what Leader Elizabeth May declared “a referendum on climate change” has been lost, she said Tuesday. May said Tuesday afternoon that she was “wasting no time” in making the point to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “that most Canadian voters voted for parties that said they were ready to step up and take climate change seriously.” “I had a May said Tuesday afternoon that she was “wasting no time” in making the point to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau “that most Canadian voters voted for parties that said they were ready to step up and take climate change seriously.

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