Canada: Trudeau environment policy a letdown for young Canada activists - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Canada Trudeau environment policy a letdown for young Canada activists

08:15  20 october  2019
08:15  20 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Pipeline politics loom large in final scheduled federal leaders' debates

  Pipeline politics loom large in final scheduled federal leaders' debates OTTAWA — The political weight attached to whether and where to build pipelines in Canada came through clearly Thursday night in the French-language leaders' debate, in a spirited two-hour contest that marks a milestone for the federal election campaign. Advance polls open Friday and with them, the countdown to the Oct. 21 election day begins in earnest. The six federal party leaders argued over a wide range of subjects that had yet to be tackled in detail so far in the campaign, including digital rights and Canada's trade with China.

This policy reflects the values and priorities of young Canadians , gives young people a voice in matters important to them, and creates more opportunities for young people to I thank all young Canadians for their hard work and dedication in making Canada ’s first-ever youth policy a reality.

Four years on, frustration and apathy could alienate young people in a campaign marked by sniping, absence of bold policy and the blackface scandal.

a group of people sitting in front of a crowd: Students protest for stronger climate policy outside Justin Trudeau's campaign headquarters in Montreal© Louis BAUDOIN Students protest for stronger climate policy outside Justin Trudeau's campaign headquarters in Montreal

Bearing posters of Justin Trudeau's face, written over with green crosses and the word "pipeline," students gathered in front of the prime minister's Montreal campaign headquarters.

"Three steps forward, three steps back, that's government policy," they chanted. They -- like many other young Canadians -- were railing against what they consider deficiencies in Trudeau's environmental policy.

Justin Trudeau et al. standing next to a bicycle: Student climate protesters hold posters showing Justin Trudeau's face crossed out or with the word © Louis BAUDOIN Student climate protesters hold posters showing Justin Trudeau's face crossed out or with the word "pipeline" written over it

The nationalization of an oil pipeline in 2018 is one of the major criticisms leveled against Trudeau, who is seeking re-election in Canada's election on Monday.

Trudeau says threat to his safety grows from online polarization and hate

  Trudeau says threat to his safety grows from online polarization and hate TORONTO — Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says a security threat that forced him to wear a bullet-proof vest on Saturday is an unfortunate consequence of an online campaign of hate and lies that is polarizing politics both in Canada and around the world. Trudeau is also accusing the Conservatives of "reprehensible" conduct and "flat-out" lying to Canadians about the Liberals, but he is not blaming them for whatever threat prompted an increase security presence on his campaign.He says the blame for the threat — which neither he nor the RCMP will explain — lies at the feet of the person or people who made it.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appears to be on the brink of losing his parliamentary majority. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media regarding photos and video that have surfaced in which he is wearing dark makeup on September 19, 2019 in Winnipeg, Canada .

Environment . Justin Trudeau ’s government has come under renewed pressure to ban seal hunting after it emerged that Canada is spending far more Prime minister Trudeau was recently lobbied by actor Pamela Anderson to phase out government subsidies that prop up the struggling sealing industry.

The Liberal government bought the Trans Mountain pipeline, which links Alberta to British Columbia, from the American energy giant Kinder Morgan for Can$4.5 billion ($2.7 billion, 2.4 billion euros).

a man wearing a yellow jacket standing next to a building: © Louis BAUDOIN "Buying the Trans Mountain pipeline... was a huge disappointment," said Annabelle Couture-Guay of Divest McGill

The goal was to speed up the export of oil from Alberta to new foreign markets. In exchange, the Canadian government promised to invest the profits in green technology.

Many Canadian environmentalists viewed Trudeau's move as a betrayal. The deal may cost him crucial votes on Monday, with the prime minister currently polling neck and neck with Conservative Andrew Scheer.

For activists, Trudeau, who was a symbol of hope when he took office in 2015, is no longer a change agent but the man who didn't do enough for the environment.

Trudeau accuses Tories of running 'one of the dirtiest, nastiest campaigns'

  Trudeau accuses Tories of running 'one of the dirtiest, nastiest campaigns' MONTREAL — Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau says the Conservatives are running one of the dirtiest, nastiest campaigns based on disinformation that Canada has ever seen. Trudeau went on to say that Canadians are saddened to see some parties running polarizing and negative campaigns using tactics imported from other countries. Over the weekend, a security threat forced Trudeau to wear a bulletproof vest at an event, and the next day he lamented the divisive nature of the campaign.He said the Conservatives are adopting the politics of fear and negativity, though he did not blame them for the security threat.

Image copyright AFN. Image caption Autumn Peltier meets Prime Minister Justin Trudeau . A year ago, Autumn found herself face-to-face with Justin Trudeau at the Assembly of First Nations' annual winter meeting. After going to university and law school, she has set her sights on Canada 's top job.

OTTAWA — As President Trump’s executive order on immigration stranded people around the world and provoked condemnation, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada took to social media to restate the country’s open-door policy .

- 'Huge disappointment' -

On university campuses, protesting for the environment -- one of the key issues in the election -- is all the rage.

"We're seeing an uptick in membership in all sorts of environmental groups at McGill" in recent weeks, said Audrey Nelles from Divest McGill, a student group advocating for the prestigious Montreal university to withdraw funds it has invested in fossil fuels.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Student climate protesters say they will keep up the pressure -- even if they aren't yet old enough to vote themselves© Louis BAUDOIN Student climate protesters say they will keep up the pressure -- even if they aren't yet old enough to vote themselves

"I think that after the Harper years, there was a lot of hope," said Annabelle Couture-Guay, also of Divest McGill, referring to Trudeau's Conservative predecessor Stephen Harper.

But "buying the Trans Mountain pipeline, that was a huge disappointment. It made a lot of people cynical," she said.

The pipeline issue has also provided Trudeau's rivals with plenty of ammunition.

His victory speech barely over, Trudeau hits the métro for selfies, handshakes

  His victory speech barely over, Trudeau hits the métro for selfies, handshakes Continuing a practice begun four years ago when his Liberal Party formed a majority government, Prime minister Justin Trudeau returned to the Jarry métro Tuesday morning to thank constituents for their support. Though he had been giving a victory speech in downtown Montreal just a few hours before — after a vote that was finally counted well after midnight — the smiling Trudeau seemed energetic as he stood by the subway station escalator to shake hands and take selfies with early morning commuters. Métro riders were delighted to see him. “I am so happy you won,” one man said.

OTTAWA — If there is such a thing as unwelcome good news, President Trump may have handed some to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada on Tuesday when he revived a cross-border oil pipeline project.

For years, climate change activists have criticized the Canadian government as a global warming laggard. Even with a resounding win, however, it may provide surprisingly difficult for new Prime Minister Trudeau to enacting strong environmental and energy policy at the federal level in Canada .

The Liberals "tried to please everyone, and that drew criticism from the right for not having gone far enough in economic development, and from the left for having bought the pipeline," said Daniel Beland, a political specialist at McGill.

At the end of September, the New Democratic Party (NDP) -- whose leader Jagmeet Singh has risen in the polls and appeals to the Liberal left wing -- issued a five-word statement responding to Trudeau's climate plan: "You. Bought. A. Pipeline."

- Future -

Liberals have pledged net zero carbon emissions by 2050, two billion trees planted and the promotion of clean technology.

There have also been a few advances, such as a federal carbon tax plan, the protection of 14 percent of marine and coastal areas, and the publication of major scientific reports on climate change in Canada.

Young voters demanding stronger climate policy are facing a dilemma because of Canada's first-past-the-post system: voting for smaller parties can split the vote between the left and the center, opening the door for the Conservatives.

But protesters at "Fridays for Future," a movement started by teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, promise to continue applying pressure -- whether or not they are of voting age.

"Since we're young people who can't vote, we want to influence people who can," explained Marlene Gaudreau, 17, co-organizer of a Friday protest outside Trudeau's campaign office.

"We would like to have a future too," she said.

EU, Germany welcome 'continuity' on climate change with Liberal minority win .
OTTAWA — The European Union and Germany say they appreciate the "continuity" in Canadian climate change policy that will result from the federal election result. The Liberals won a minority mandate after a campaign that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau framed as a fight over protecting the planet from the existential threat of climate change. Trudeau portrayed his Conservative opponent Andrew Scheer as a climate change laggard, a charge Scheer answered as amounting to hypocrisy because the Liberals hadn't met their greenhouse-gas reduction targets.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 6
This is interesting!