Canada: Chris Selley: Canada multiculturalism may be on full display at Scheer's closing rally, but we're no closer to unification - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada Chris Selley: Canada multiculturalism may be on full display at Scheer's closing rally, but we're no closer to unification

07:45  21 october  2019
07:45  21 october  2019 Source:   nationalpost.com

Justin Trudeau visiting Winnipeg Saturday as campaign reaches peak

  Justin Trudeau visiting Winnipeg Saturday as campaign reaches peak Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has a marathon day of campaigning ahead, starting early this morning near Niagara Falls, Ont., and ending with a late-night rally in Calgary after a stop in Winnipeg along the way. The federal election campaign has reached a crescendo, with leaders giving it their all to try to excite their volunteers and get every last potential voter to the polls on Monday.Trudeau's schedule includes three rallies, including one in Winnipeg.He's scheduled to meet with supporters at 7 p.m. at the Punjab Cultural Centre located at 1770 King Edward Street.

“Speaking to people where they are is a way of saying, ‘Hey I respect you, I value you and I want your input and I want you to be involved,’ and that’s been really Chris Selley : Canada multiculturalism may be on full display at Scheer ' s closing rally , but we ' re no closer to unification .

Multiculturalism , the view that cultures, races, and ethnicities, particularly those of minority groups, deserve special acknowledgement of their differences within a dominant political culture. That acknowledgement can take the forms of recognition of contributions to the cultural life of the.

(Provided by The Canadian Press)

(Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.)

RICHMOND HILL, Ont. — It’s a cliché, but it’s also true, that first-time visitors to Toronto are often astonished at the diversity they see. But even when you live in Toronto most of your life, its diversities — of ethnicity, of religion, of … taste — can amaze you. On Saturday night in Richmond Hill, just north of the city, reporters covering the Conservative campaign were ushered into the Premiere Ballroom through a massive kitchen. Not much was going on except for (at a guess) 100 pounds of tripe soaking in a giant sink. I was expecting a bog-standard Chinese-Canadian banquet hall.

Scheer won't say if Conservatives hired consultant to 'destroy' People's party

  Scheer won't say if Conservatives hired consultant to 'destroy' People's party TORONTO — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is refusing to say whether his party hired a consulting firm to attack the People's Party of Canada. The Globe and Mail reports that strategist Warren Kinsella and his firm Daisy Group were hired to "seek and destroy" Maxime Bernier's party and portray its supporters as racist. The newspaper cites a source with direct knowledge of the project as saying the client is the Conservative Party of Canada. But Scheer answered repeated questions on the report today with the same refrain — that he doesn't comment on vendors that his party "may or may not have engaged with.

In lieu of Scheer ’ s unbearable power-rock campaign song, he was led to the stage by a bagpiper. Scheer ’ s party might not think so should he fail to become prime minister in the coming weeks, but Indeed there are . But we should recall that Conservative support for Québécois nationhood came not

If we are sincere about multiculturalism then we need to accept that Canadian identity is not static and that it will constantly evolve thanks to its various Nations that are built on common ethnicity or faith may appear more cohesive on the outside, but they remain stagnant and their minorities will

Andrew Scheer standing on a stage in front of a crowd: Andrew Scheer, leader of Canada's Conservative Party, speaks during a rally in Langley, British Columbia, Canada, on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019.© Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg Andrew Scheer, leader of Canada's Conservative Party, speaks during a rally in Langley, British Columbia, Canada, on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. I struggle to describe the aesthetic we encountered instead. “Psychedelic Versailles on a budget,” maybe? It was dominated by enormous baroque paintings of women in 150-pound dresses and men in powdered wigs remonstrating with each other over harpsichords. Hanging incongruously above the gold-painted cash bar was an even more enormous Heywood Hardy knock-off painting of a British fox hunt. Faux-marble statues of shapely women had lamps bolted on to them; at the entrance, several guarded a gloriously maudlin illuminated waterfall. The chandeliers looked like they were bought second hand from a defunct airport hotel, 20 years ago. It was madly glorious. If you like Chinese food and need to host an event in the area, you would be a fool to go elsewhere.

Chris Selley: Scheer’s silence is either suspicious or baffling

  Chris Selley: Scheer’s silence is either suspicious or baffling “Yes.” That’s all Andrew Scheer needed to say. The Globe and Mail reported this weekend that the Conservatives hired a consulting firm, Daisy group, to dig up dirt on Maxime Bernier and his People’s Party, with a goal of keeping him out of the leaders’ debates or, failing that, just generally discredit them as much as possible. It’s all very interesting. It’s potentially mildly embarrassing, inasmuch as they didn’t hire a better consulting firm. And honestly, no one should need outside help to raise questions about Bernier’s various, shall we say, unconventional candidates.

Rallly is a free collaborative scheduling service that helps you and your friends decide on a date to host an event! Rallly is open source, so you can contribute to the project on GitHub. Where can I submit a feature request? You can either create a new issue on GitHub or send an email to [email protected]

During these events, we have been promoting some of our projects and also promoting our mission. The most common question we get is : What does it mean for Canada to be a multicultural society? A lot of people don’t understand the meaning of multiculturalism itself and what it means for Canada

Andrew Scheer’s rally, hosted by Senator Linda Frum, was the Conservative leader’s campaign farewell to Central Canada, and it’s fair to call it a major success. The party pegged the crowd at 2,000, and that didn’t sound silly. And the assembled partisans quite splendidly represented one of the great successes of the newly reformed conservative alliance, which is its diversity.

Richmond Hill is a classic example of Canadian multiculturalism, and a rejection of the “ethnic enclave” worries propagated by people like Maxime Bernier: 57 per cent of residents are immigrants, according to the 2016 census, and 62 per cent claimed a mother tongue other than English or French. Of those, 40 per cent first spoke Mandarin or Cantonese, but 17 per cent first spoke Farsi, 8 per cent Russian, 5 per cent Italian, 4 per cent Korean and 3 per cent Arabic.

Liberal Majid Jowhari is Canada’s first MP of Iranian descent. In Richmond Hill, he’s up against Costas Menegakis, who won the riding for the Conservatives in 2011. The NDP’s candidate is Adam DeVita, the Greens’ is Iccha Kohli, the People’s Party’s is Igor Tvorogov. All that diversity was on display both visually and aurally on Saturday night at Scheer’s largest and most enthusiastic crowd by far.

Scheer heads to historic Liberal riding to urge Canadians to vote out government

  Scheer heads to historic Liberal riding to urge Canadians to vote out government REGINA — In every campaign office Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer has visited this election, there's been a sign: victory is knocking. Door knocking, the party means, and Scheer did exactly that in the waning hours of the election campaign Monday as his party fights fiercely to form government. Door knocking, the party means, and Scheer did exactly that in the waning hours of the election campaign Monday as his party fights fiercely to form government.

There may be no bigger issue in the vote-rich GTA than transit, and this is likely to be true for decades to come Share this story. Chris Selley : Scenes from a gridlock city. Federal leaders have little to say on But we were going against traffic. Going the other direction on the Gardiner, it was jammed solid.

Trudeau is certainly right that Canadians are divided today. He may indeed genuinely wonder if he could have done more to help. Canadians should elect Andrew Scheer and a Conservative majority government. Life is good in Canada . But we cannot accept as a given that it always will be .

That sort of thing makes me a bit misty-eyed about my city. But most kinds of Canadian diversity make me misty-eyed about my country as well. It’s at least superficially heartening to know that the same leader, representing the same big tent, can successfully make the same basic pitch to a crowd in a rural Nova Scotia community centre one night, in a stronghold of Quebec nationalism the night after that, and in a place like Richmond Hill the night after that. (It’s also heartening to know he can fairly effectively knock down a “lock him up” chant, as Scheer did in Richmond Hill — encouraging “vote him out” instead.)

It becomes somewhat less heartening when you consider the extent to which some of these constituencies are being pandered to, of course. If Scheer doesn’t wake up Tuesday morning in Regina in a position to become prime minister, his party may view his “whatever you want short of independence” pitch to Quebecers as something of a liability. Scheer sounded downright silly in Vancouver on Sunday warning that “a vote for the Bloc is a vote for a referendum.” The Bloc couldn’t hold a referendum with every seat in Quebec at its command, and there is little reason to attribute its resurgence to a renewed appetite for separatism.

Chris Selley: It's not Scheer's fault the Tories lost. Blame the dreck that passed for his platform

  Chris Selley: It's not Scheer's fault the Tories lost. Blame the dreck that passed for his platform REGINA — This will come as little comfort to the hundreds of Conservatives who came out here on Monday night expecting a “strong Conservative majority government” — something Andrew Scheer repeatedly assured them was in the cards, ostensibly based on internal polling. CBC was on the big screen at the International Trade Centre as the network called the election for the Liberals, just after 8 p.m. local time, and as I write this it has been deathly silent ever since, even as more and more supporters stream in. But folks, let’s face it: Even a Conservative minority was a longshot.

Because whether or not we are all multiculturalists, the concerned philosophy affects us all beyond having As well as, how much multiculturalism is enough to maintain sustainable cohesiveness in contemporary In case of Canada , for example, which has an official policy of multiculturalism

Share this story. Chris Selley : Is Canada cool? But we do have a handsome former snowboard instructor for a prime minister, and he has a lovely family. And we have some nice restaurants in our big cities, and we export a fair number of celebrities to the United States and we never fail to remind

Even with the Bloc in remission, however, it was tough to say Canada was in any meaningful sense unified. Not being on the verge of falling apart isn’t an achievement in itself. This is a federation whose would-be Conservative prime minister promises a premiers’ meeting on Jan. 6 to start negotiating — negotiating! — free trade between provinces. This is a country designed such that things like pipelines can be built for the good of all, but where even government ownership is no guarantee of such a thing getting built.

If following a leader around on one of these absurdly mile-intensive campaign tours is occasionally heartening, far more so would be if far more ordinary Canadians could see that much of the country and its people. It’s no surprise that Canadians tend to travel abroad rather than within Canada: the distances alone explain it, even before you look at the state of competition in the airline industry. More familiarity between Canada’s endless diversities wouldn’t steel our national resolve on its own; but the lack of it means our national frustrations are no surprise.

Chris Selley: Rethinking the shameless election, and how it was covered — damp squib and all .
One of the odder criticisms of the election campaign we all just endured is that it was unprecedently nasty. Last week, Global News ran a story headlined “Conservatives running ‘one of the dirtiest, nastiest campaigns’ Trudeau alleges,” in which essentially the sole evidence — other than Justin Trudeau saying it over and over again — was Andrew Scheer’s prediction that a re-elected Trudeau government would tax capital gains on the sale of principal residences. The Conservatives were shameless with this sort of prediction-stated-as-fact.

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