Canada: Ford 'going to pursue' carbon tax challenge to Supreme Court - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada Ford 'going to pursue' carbon tax challenge to Supreme Court

17:50  24 october  2019
17:50  24 october  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Ford mum on carbon tax challenge in congratulatory election statement

  Ford mum on carbon tax challenge in congratulatory election statement Without mentioning the status of his ongoing federal carbon tax challenge, Ontario Premier Doug Ford congratulated Justin Trudeau on his election victory in a statement released early Tuesday morning. Ford congratulated Trudeau and the other federal party leaders "on a hard fought campaign," which ended late Monday with the Liberals' hanging on to power with a minority government.

The federal government's carbon pricing scheme is constitutionally sound and has the critical purpose of fighting climate change, Ontario's top court ruled in a split Minister Jeff Yurek says his government will appeal an Ontario court decision quashing their carbon tax challenge at the Supreme Court .

rejecting a challenge from Premier Doug Ford 's government to the validity of the carbon -pricing "We promised to use every tool at our disposal to challenge the carbon tax and we will continue to "There are many ways to address climate change, and the provinces have ample authority to pursue them." The Supreme Court of Canada has said it will hear Saskatchewan's appeal of that ruling in

Doug Ford said Thursday his government is "going to pursue" its legal challenge of the federal carbon tax, days after Justin Trudeau's Liberals secured another mandate in the form of a minority government.

Speaking in his first media interview since Monday's election, Ford told CP24 "we will see it through" when asked about the fate of the challenge.

In June, Ontario's top court struck down his government's case against the tax, saying the federal legislation — the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, enacted in April — is constitutionally sound. The same day, the Ford government signalled its intention to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Conservative carbon tax 'resistance' showing cracks after Liberals re-elected

  Conservative carbon tax 'resistance' showing cracks after Liberals re-elected The so-called "resistance" force of Conservative premiers waging war against the carbon tax implemented by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau began showing cracks on Tuesday, following the Liberals' re-election. While some of the five provincial leaders who had publicly criticized or legally challenged the carbon tax maintained their attacks in the hours after voters elected a minority Liberal government, at least one appeared to back down. TheWhile some of the five provincial leaders who had publicly criticized or legally challenged the carbon tax maintained their attacks in the hours after voters elected a minority Liberal government, at least one appeared to back down.

Ford vowed to fight Ottawa's carbon pricing plan and eliminate Ontario's The federal carbon tax is scheduled to kick in on Jan. 1 and experts say the court cases targeting it will not be resolved before that deadline. But then they’re going around and taking the rights away from Toronto,” NDP Leader

Saskatchewan's Court of Appeal has ruled that the carbon tax imposed on the province by the federal government is constitutionally sound and falls within the Premier Scott Moe said the decision will be appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada. The province has about 30 days to appeal, according to

But in August, Ford was more circumspect, saying he would consult with the provincial attorney general and cabinet after the federal election to determine the way forward on the file. At the time, he suggested that voters would be the ones to determine the fate of the challenge.

Ford had also previously said his government is committed to spending $30 million to challenge the tax.

On Tuesday, his congratulatory message to Trudeau remained mum on the carbon tax. Ford said only that he congratulated all federal party leaders "on a hard fought campaign." He also said all three levels of government must work together on key issues that are priorities for Canadians, like affordability, housing and health care.

The federal government imposed a carbon-pricing scheme on Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan, all of which don't have one of their own, earlier this year. The Supreme Court will hear Saskatchewan's challenge of the tax in December. Alberta and Manitoba have also mounted court challenges to the tax, while New Brunswick has supported Saskatchewan's challenge.

On Tuesday, New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said given the federal election results, voters have spoken on the issue of a carbon tax. The federal Liberals lost three seats to the Conservatives in the province, but retained six and garnered some 20,000 more votes than the Conservatives. As a result, Higgs said, his government will look at crafting a made-in-New Brunswick carbon pricing scheme that aligns with the federal Liberals' climate plan.

Supreme Court sides with university in case of missing professor's pension .
Supreme Court sides with university in case of missing professor's pensionGeorge Roseme, a political science professor at Carleton University, was 77 and suffering from early-stage Alzheimer's disease when he disappeared in September 2007.

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