•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Singh calls for reform of 'broken' voting system after NDP falls short in Quebec

22:00  24 october  2019
22:00  24 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

18-year-old Winnipeg woman with terminal cancer casts 1st vote, urges others to do the same

  18-year-old Winnipeg woman with terminal cancer casts 1st vote, urges others to do the same When 18-year-old Maddison Yetman’s first chance to vote rolled around with the upcoming federal election, she wasn’t going to let anything get in her way — not even a sudden, terminal cancer diagnosis. And after casting her ballot on Saturday, Yetman wanted to take it one step further and urge other people to get out and vote. On Tuesday morning, she posted a video on Twitter describing how, despite being bedridden and having limited time to live, she still managed to get it done. "If I can find the time to vote, you can find the time to vote," Yetman says in the video before flipping to a sign that reads "#WhatsYourExcuse.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh delivers his concession speech at the NDP Election Night Party in Burnaby BC, Canada, on October 21, 2019. - Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party held onto power in a nail-biter of a Canadian general election on Monday, but as a weakened minority government. Television projections declared the Liberals winners or leading in 157 of the nation's 338 electoral districts, versus 121 for his main rival Andrew Scheer and the Conservatives, after polling stations across six time zones closed. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh failed to gain seats for the party. (Photo by Don MacKinnon / AFP) (Photo by DON MACKINNON/AFP via Getty Images)© Getty NDP leader Jagmeet Singh delivers his concession speech at the NDP Election Night Party in Burnaby BC, Canada, on October 21, 2019. - Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party held onto power in a nail-biter of a Canadian general election on Monday, but as a weakened minority government. Television projections declared the Liberals winners or leading in 157 of the nation's 338 electoral districts, versus 121 for his main rival Andrew Scheer and the Conservatives, after polling stations across six time zones closed. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh failed to gain seats for the party. (Photo by Don MacKinnon / AFP) (Photo by DON MACKINNON/AFP via Getty Images)

BURNABY, B.C. — If there's any election that has highlighted how "broken" Canada's electoral system is, it's this one, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said in his morning-after assessment.

Singh invokes memory of Layton as federal leaders make final pitch in Quebec

  Singh invokes memory of Layton as federal leaders make final pitch in Quebec NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh invoked the legacy of his venerated predecessor Wednesday, hoping the memory of Jack Layton — the principal architect of the NDP's best-ever showing in a federal election — would separate him from a pack of rivals wooing voters in Quebec as the clock ticks down to voting day.Every federal leader save Elizabeth May began Wednesday in Quebec, including three in and around the Montreal area. It was a rare campaign confluence where major party leaders were in the same area at the same time, and a clear sign of where strategists are focusing their efforts with less than a week to go.

Monday's vote saw his party relegated to fourth place in the House of Commons behind the Bloc Quebecois despite finishing third in the popular vote.

The Liberals under Justin Trudeau eked out a minority-government victory despite securing only 33.1 per cent of the popular vote as compared to 34.4 per cent for the Andrew Scheer's Conservatives.

Elections Canada's vote tallies show the Conservatives garnered the most actual votes with more than 6.1 million ballots cast in their favour versus 5.9 million for the Liberals. Yet the Liberals ended up with 157 seats — 36 more than the 121 won by the Tories.

The NDP was third in the popular vote with 2.8 million and the Bloc Quebecois was fourth with 1.3 million. However, the New Democrats secured only 24 seats while the resurgent Bloc grabbed 32 seats, half of them from the NDP in Quebec.

A 338Canada projection: If proportional representation was real

  A 338Canada projection: If proportional representation was real Philippe J. Fournier: How would this tight election end if Trudeau had kept his electoral reform promise? With three powerful parties, for starters.I thought it would be interesting to follow up on this column I wrote for Maclean’s last spring, in which I simulated how voting intentions then would translate into a regional proportional representation.

"I believe this election has shown the problems with the current system," Singh told reporters Tuesday in Burnaby, B.C.

"I think that the results show not a broken Canada — the people, in a lot of ways, share so many values, share far more values than they have separate. But the results show a broken electoral system, and it's certainly clear we need to fix it."

Under straight proportional representation, the Liberals would have won 112 seats (45 fewer than they actually won), the Conservatives would have won 116 (five fewer than Monday's result) and the NDP would have received 54 seats, which would have translated to 30 more NDP MPs in Ottawa.

The Bloc, which represents only the interests of Quebec, would have had 26 seats rather than the 32 they now have and the Green party, which won only three seats in Parliament on Monday, would have had 22 under proportional representation. Five seats would have gone to the People's Party of Canada and the remaining three to other parties.

Green Leader Elizabeth May promises electoral reform, lowering voting age to 16

  Green Leader Elizabeth May promises electoral reform, lowering voting age to 16 VANCOUVER — Green Leader Elizabeth May says if her party is elected Monday, it will be the last federal government in Canada chosen by the first-past-the-post system. In a release, May says a Green government would launch a citizens' assembly with a mandate to make recommendations to Parliament on a new electoral system based on proportional representation. The Greens also say they will lower the voting age to 16. The Liberals included electoral reform as part of their platform for the 2015 election, but dropped the idea shortly after winning a majority mandate.

Seen another way, the Greens ended up with one MP for every 387,249 votes under the current first-past-the-post system. The Liberals, meanwhile, received one MP for every 37,655 votes.

The NDP has long pushed for adopting a mixed-member proportional-representative system, which involves a combination of legislators elected to represent particular geographic areas and others named from party lists so the standings in the Commons more closely match the national popular vote. The NDP platform also promised a referendum after two electoral cycles on whether to keep the new system.

Singh said he plans to push for a proportional-representation system as he moves forward with a plan to work more closely with the Liberals — who promised in 2015 to end the first-past-the-post system — in the upcoming minority Parliament.

"I've long called for and will continue to call for true electoral reform, which means, for me, giving power to people, having their voice be heard and so I believe in proportional representation," Singh said Tuesday.

Singh did not commit to any specifics or timelines when pledging to push for electoral reform Tuesday. In the days leading up to the election, when asked whether it would be a redline for negotiating a coalition or co-operation agreement with the Liberals in a minority government, the NDP leader said electoral reform would not be an urgent condition.

Liberal search for dance partners: areas where Trudeau might find common ground

  Liberal search for dance partners: areas where Trudeau might find common ground OTTAWA — The Liberals won more seats Monday than any other party, but came up short in their effort to return to Parliament with another majority mandate. Unlike in Justin Trudeau's first term, this time the Liberal prime minister will have to strike agreements with political rivals as he tries to win their support to pass legislation and, in some cases, survive confidence votes in the House of Commons. First, some math. Here are the seat totals for each party following the election.— Liberals: 157 seats, 13 shy of the 170 necessary for a majority in the 338-seat House of Commons.

"It's essential, but it's not urgent," he told reporters in Brampton on Oct. 12.

Trudeau promised during the 2015 federal election to reform the electoral system and get rid of the current first-past-the-post system in which the candidate with the highest number of votes claims victory. He later broke that promise.

Real Lavergne, president of Fair Vote Canada, said the first-past-the-post voting system has cheated voters in every province. That's why Fair Vote Canada is calling on the parties to launch a citizens' assembly on electoral reform and act on its recommendations.

"We feel that this election provides a significant opportunity for forward movement on electoral reform if the NDP makes a priority of it," Lavergne said.

"I don't believe the Liberals would flat-out implement proportional representation, having retreated from their earlier promise. ... Trudeau justified the broken promise by claiming there was 'no consensus.' A citizens' assembly is what we need to establish that consensus."

That might be a hard sell for the newly re-elected Liberal prime minister. A week before the election, Trudeau was asked whether he would be open to any kind of electoral reform.

Trudeau, who has previously voiced his preference for a preferential ballot, in which voters rank their choices, said the Liberal government tried to find consensus on changing Canada's electoral system while in power, "and that consensus was not to be found."

This report was first published by The Canadian Press on Oct. 22, 2019.

Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version transposed the projected Liberal and Conservative results under proportional representation.

Quebecers will soon have to be at least 21 years old to legally consume cannabis .
QUEBEC — The Quebec government has passed the most restrictive cannabis law in the country, voting to ban the consumption of marijuana in most public areas and to raise the legal age from 18 to 21 years. Beginning Saturday, Quebecers will be prohibited from consuming marijuana in public. But the law permits cities to adopt their own bylaws allowing people to smoke cannabis in specific public areas where no children are present. As of Jan. 1,Beginning Saturday, Quebecers will be prohibited from consuming marijuana in public.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!