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Canada Liberals benefited most from strategic voting, poll of late-deciding voters finds

15:45  25 october  2019
15:45  25 october  2019 Source:   nationalpost.com

Liberal appeal for strategic votes in B.C. Interior is 'fear-mongering,' Green candidate says

  Liberal appeal for strategic votes in B.C. Interior is 'fear-mongering,' Green candidate says The Liberal candidate for Cariboo–Prince George is making a direct appeal to NDP and Green supporters to vote strategically in an effort to flip the longtime Conservative riding, a move the local Green Party candidate has denounced as "fear-mongering."The Liberal candidate for Cariboo–Prince George is making a direct appeal to NDP and Green supporters to vote strategically in an effort to flip the longtime Conservative riding, a move the local Green Party candidate has denounced as "fear-mongering.

In voting methods, tactical voting (or strategic voting , sophisticated voting or insincere voting ) occurs in elections with more than two candidates

Part 2: Vote dynamics. The strategic voting factor. That said, current Green support comes largely from past Liberal voters , as does much of the NDP’s current support. The strategic voting factor. Roughly one-third (35%) of decided and leaning voters say they are planning to vote for a party not

a man sitting in a box: A woman votes in the federal election on Oct. 21, 2019.© Brett Gundlock/Getty Images A woman votes in the federal election on Oct. 21, 2019.

Strategic voters helped the Liberals more than any other party, according to an Angus Reid poll published Friday. The research confirms suspicions that many Canadians begrudgingly voted Liberal in order to prevent an alternative party from winning.

“This wasn’t an election where people were feeling particularly inspired to vote for something,” says Shachi Kurl, executive director of the Angus Reid Institute. “They were voting defensively.”

After polling potential voters throughout the election, Angus Reid went back and interviewed participants who had been undecided three weeks before election day. Between Oct. 21 and 22, the pollsters conducted an online survey of more than 1,500 late-deciding voters.

Follow your head or your heart: A progressive voter's strategic struggle

  Follow your head or your heart: A progressive voter's strategic struggle Tony Myatt’s exactly the kind of voter Justin Trudeau was talking about when the Liberal leader swooped into Fredericton earlier this week with a plea to progressive voters. "For me, the defining issue is climate change," Myatt said Thursday morning in an interview at his home. "I believe there's a climate emergency. It's very, very serious, very dire. We need action."But the economics professor at the University of New Brunswick has spent the last week agonizing about how to achieve that at the ballot box."We need to stop the Conservatives from gaining power," he said.

Vote strategically and prevent vote splitting. Make a real change by electing a strong progressive government in Canada. Five million Canadians went to the poll and cast a ballot to make a statement and ended up With Strategic Voting , the Liberal Party seats will more than triple from 34 to 114

I asked Vote Strategic BC (@votestrategicbc), which encourages anti- Liberal voters to engage in poll -based decision -making, “Could you tell me what makes these polls more reliable than the ones that Proponents of strategic voting have granted political polls a status that they haven’t earned.

Policy platforms were less important to these voters than was strategy, which benefited the Liberals most, the survey found. Just one-third of Liberal voters and 42 per cent of Conservative voters in the survey were primarily motivated by the party’s policies, while 45 per cent of Liberal voters and one-quarter of Tory voters were primarily motivated by a desire to vote strategically.

Although most Green and NDP voters were motivated by admiration for their chosen parties, 61 per cent of Liberal voters and 65 per cent of Conservative voters said they merely disliked the alternatives more.

“The data confirms basically a suspicion that the political chattering classes had been bandying about and speculating about on election night and in the run-up to election night,” says Kurl, “which was the extent to which strategic voting — and certainly a desire in part to either help a candidate win or to block another party from being elected — ended up playing a role in vote dynamics.”

NDP sees surge of support from B.C. voters in election's final days, poll finds

  NDP sees surge of support from B.C. voters in election's final days, poll finds With just days left before final ballots are cast in the federal election, a new poll released Friday says the NDP has seen a surge of support among voters in British Columbia. The survey, conducted online by Insights West, asked 1,670 adults living in B.C. who they would vote for in their constituency, if they had to vote that day. They were surveyed between Sunday and Wednesday.If they had already cast their ballot during advance voting or by mail, they were asked to select the party for which they voted.Results found the NDP pushed ahead of the Liberals for second place in B.C.

Strategic voting a key consideration for many . In a sign of what could well be a “hold your nose and vote ” election, many Ontarians say they will be This poll finds just under one-in-five decided and leaning voters (17%) in Ontario saying they plan to vote for the party that has been in power for more

He added that many voters found themselves without a favourite candidate this time around. With many responding to previous polls that they The data suggested that the majority of voters were confident in their votes . Over 70 per cent of voters responded that they were sure of their choice, and

Votes were volatile, the poll found. Nearly one-quarter of late-deciding voters said they made their decisions on the day they voted, and 12 per cent said they settled on their decisions in the last couple of days.

The research also shows that the Liberals benefited from backtracking on their electoral-reform agenda. During the 2015 campaign, Justin Trudeau promised it would be the last election with a first-past-the-post voting system — “we will make every vote count,” his platform read.

a person holding a sign:  Just one-third of Liberal voters and 42 per cent of Conservative voters in a poll of late-deciding voters were primarily motivated by the party’s policies.© Peter J. Thompson/National Post Just one-third of Liberal voters and 42 per cent of Conservative voters in a poll of late-deciding voters were primarily motivated by the party’s policies.

Yet, two years later, he said he couldn’t get other parties to agree to transition to a ranked-ballot voting system, with the NDP adamant to introduce proportional representation.

On Monday, the broken promise paid off, as the Liberals won approximately 5.9 million votes compared to the Conservatives 6.2 million votes but still secured a minority government thanks to winning more seats.

“If we had had proportional representation in the House of Commons, you’d be looking at the Conservatives holding the advantage in the House and perhaps being the party asked to form government,” says Kurl. “For all parties, they’re probably having a think about the could’ve-would’ve-should’ve-beens around electoral reform.”

The online survey was conducted with a representative randomized sample of 1,587 Canadian adult members of Angus Reid Forum. For comparison purposes, a probability sample of this size would carry a margin of error plus or minus 2 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

Kelly McParland: When did our elections turn into contests for who is least worst? .
Wouldn’t it be pleasant to enter a voting booth and mark a check beside the name of a candidate you actually supported, admired, or who represented a party you were genuinely enthused about? As opposed, that is, to grudgingly voting for someone you don’t particularly care about, but who you figure is the best way to block the candidate or the party you desperately don’t want to win? Yes, it’s an enticing picture: an election that features attractive candidates, representing popular parties that stand for reasonable policies. Sure … and maybe some day a Canadian team will actually win the Stanley Cup again.

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