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Canada Ontario public elementary teachers vote 98 per cent in favour of strike amid stalled bargaining with Ford government

17:55  01 november  2019
17:55  01 november  2019 Source:   nationalpost.com

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High school teachers and teachers in the English Catholic system are also holding strike votes Major education unions have been critical of the government ’s overall direction since taking power Article content. TORONTO — Public elementary teachers in Ontario have voted 98 per cent in

Ontario elementary school teachers have voted overwhelmingly in favour of strike action amid ongoing negotiations with the province. Cristina Howorun on what issues are creating hurdles in bargaining .

a group of people standing in front of a sign: Students protest at City Hall in Kingston in April over Doug Ford's budget cuts towards education. Major education unions have been critical of the government’s overall direction since taking power last year.© Amy Walton/SunMedia Students protest at City Hall in Kingston in April over Doug Ford's budget cuts towards education. Major education unions have been critical of the government’s overall direction since taking power last year.

TORONTO — Public elementary teachers in Ontario have voted 98 per cent in favour of a strike should it become necessary.

The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario is calling the result of the vote an “overwhelming” mandate from its 83,000 members.

The union filed for conciliation last month, saying bargaining with Premier Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservative government had reached a virtual standstill.

Ontario's public elementary teachers vote 98 per cent in favour of strike action

  Ontario's public elementary teachers vote 98 per cent in favour of strike action Ontario's public elementary teachers vote 98 per cent in favour of strike action . Teachers and the early childhood educators represented by the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario (ETFO) are prepared to act if they need to, President Sam Hammond said Friday morning in announcing the results. The “historic strike vote” sends a message that the government needs to get serious at the bargaining table, Hammond said.

Public elementary teachers in Ontario have voted 98 per cent in favour of a strike should it become necessary. 2:25 Elementary teachers in Ontario vote in favour of strike . This round of bargaining has been tense, as it comes amid the government ’s attempts to impose caps on wage

The Elementary Teachers ' Federation of Ontario is calling the result of the vote an "overwhelming" mandate from its 83,000 members. The union filed for conciliation last month, saying bargaining with Premier Doug Ford 's Progressive Conservative government had reached a virtual standstill.

High school teachers and teachers in the English Catholic system are also holding strike votes, with results expected in the next couple of weeks.

This round of bargaining has been tense, as it comes amid government attempts to impose caps on wage increases for public sector workers and increase class sizes, which will mean thousands of fewer teachers in the system.

A strike by 55,000 education workers — such as custodians, administrative staff and early childhood educators — was averted at the last minute when the government reached a tentative deal with the Canadian Union of Public Employees.

Ontario elementary teachers will be in legal strike position as of Nov. 25

  Ontario elementary teachers will be in legal strike position as of Nov. 25 Ontario elementary teachers will be in legal strike position as of Nov. 25 , 2019.In an email obtained by Global News sent to over 76,000 members the union said, "Receiving a 'no board' report doesn’t mean negotiations have ended.READ MORE: Ontario elementary teachers closer to legal strike position with no-board report request "The process of asking for a 'no board' report places heightened pressure on the government, Ontario Public School Boards’ Association and Council of Trustees’ Associations to focus on reaching an agreement.

Union members voted 98 per cent in favour of job action amid rising tensions between teachers ' unions and the province. ETFO president Sam Hammond called it a "solid, overwhelming strike vote " for Canada's largest teachers ' union. Teachers have voiced concerns around issues including class

TORONTO -- Public elementary teachers and education workers in Ontario have voted 98 per cent in The Elementary Teachers ' Federation of Ontario say talks with the province at the central Hammond wouldn't talk about specific salary expectations, but government legislation that would limit

ETFO president Sam Hammond has said the government has told the union it’s seeking $150 million in reductions to their collective agreement.

Major education unions have been critical of the government’s overall direction since taking power last year, including moves to increase high school class sizes from an average of 22 to 28, boost class sizes for Grades 4 to 8 from 23 students to 24, mandate e-learning courses and reduce per-student funding to boards.

Those hikes to class sizes over four years would mean the loss of 10,000 teaching jobs, though Education Minister Stephen Lecce has recently said he has offered in talks with the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation to scale back the increase in high school class sizes to 25.

But OSSTF has called that a “poison pill,” because the offer would also mean local class size limits are removed, essentially allowing the province to see the number of students per class climb indefinitely.

Poll suggests plenty Canadians voted strategically to stop a party from winning .
OTTAWA — More than one-third of Canadians voted strategically in last week's federal election to stop another party from winning, a new poll suggests. Thirty-five per cent of respondents to the Leger poll said their decision about who to support took into account the chances that their vote would prevent another party's candidate from being victorious. And almost as many waited until the final week of the campaign to make their choice. ThirteenThirty-five per cent of respondents to the Leger poll said their decision about who to support took into account the chances that their vote would prevent another party's candidate from being victorious.

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