Canada: Early Remembrance Day ceremony leaves no stone alone - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada Early Remembrance Day ceremony leaves no stone alone

18:31  05 november  2019
18:31  05 november  2019 Source:   edmontonjournal.com

No Stone Left Alone ceremonies to be held across Canada Monday

  No Stone Left Alone ceremonies to be held across Canada Monday No Stone Left Alone ceremonies to be held across Canada MondayNo Stone Left Alone will hold more than 100 remembrance ceremonies in more than 68 Canadian communities leading up to Remembrance Day, getting closer to its goal to have a student place a poppy on the headstone of every Canadian who has served in the country's armed forces.

Edmonton youngster Beckett Yates, 9, did his part Monday morning in carrying forward a family tradition that’s now expanded nationally. With his family, he laid a poppy on the headstone of his great-grandparents at Beechmount Cemetery.

Remembrance Day (sometimes known informally as Poppy Day owing to the tradition of the remembrance poppy) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty.

a gravestone in front of a building: Aiden Pham (7-years-old) kneels in prayer in front of a war veteran's headstone on Monday November 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the 9th annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by education students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans. (PHOTO BY LARRY WONG/POSTMEDIA) Aiden Pham (7-years-old) kneels in prayer in front of a war veteran's headstone on Monday November 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the 9th annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by education students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans. (PHOTO BY LARRY WONG/POSTMEDIA)

Edmonton youngster Beckett Yates, 9, did his part Monday morning in carrying forward a family tradition that’s now expanded nationally.

Swastikas spray-painted on Moncton skate park

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War veterans and school children pay their respects at the No Stone Left Alone ceremony held at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018.

Governor General of Canada; His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston speaks to students at the No Stone Left Alone Remembrance Ceremony .

With his family, he laid a poppy on the headstone of his great-grandparents at Beechmount Cemetery. And during an early Remembrance Day ceremony Monday, he read the Commitment to Remember poem.

Yates was one of the more than 700 Edmonton school children at the cemetery who took part of their morning to recognize fallen soldiers by placing poppies on headstones.

The event, held by the No Stone Left Alone Foundation, is part of the organization’s goal to eventually lay a poppy on each one of Canada’s military graves every November. Since starting in 2011, they’ve gone from placing 4,300 poppies to more than 63,000 this year, now at 130 sites across the country.

In addition to the children, current Canadian Armed Forces members were in attendance, along with dignitaries including Alberta Lt. Gov. Lois Mitchell, Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson and Education Minister Adriana LaGrange.

Remembrance Day should be a national holiday

  Remembrance Day should be a national holiday Our editorial: There is something beautiful in stopping work at 11 a.m. and standing at our desks in silence. But we can do better.The most moving sound at Remembrance Day ceremonies, to our minds, is not the long-held mournful note of the Last Post—hauntingly beautiful though it is. Nor is it the scorching sound of the flypast as the planes thunder overhead, tearing through the silence.

As Global’s Amanda Jelowicki reports, the No Stone Left Alone initiative teaches the youth about the importance of Remembrance Day . Montreal students take part in early Remembrance Day ceremony , learn about Canada’s war history.

No Stone Left Alone Experience › Find a Remembrance Ceremony near you, or, let us help you start one in your own community. No Stone Left Alone Memorial Foundation is, among the leading agencies, dedicated to honouring and remembering Canada’s veterans.

While the ceremonial poppy-laying has grown into a coast-to-coast-to-coast event, for Yates’s family it’s a tradition that dates back decades. Maureen Bianchini-Purvis, Yates’s grandmother, started laying a poppy at the grave of her mother, a Second World War veteran, when she was 12.

She’s been back each year since, but it was when Bianchini-Purvis’s two daughters began asking why other headstones didn’t also have poppies that she made it a goal to organize events for children across the country to help honour those who had served the country.

Yates thinks that other kids his age mostly understand the importance of recognizing their country’s veterans, but that some don’t recognize the level of sacrifice that was made.

“Not many of them actually know how serious and how big this is,” Yates said. “They left their families so they could protect Canada. They could have stayed but they didn’t.”

Dozens of Canadian flags stolen from soldiers' graves in Windsor

  Dozens of Canadian flags stolen from soldiers' graves in Windsor A total of 160 Canadian flags have gone missing from the graves of soldiers in an act that a Windsor veterans memorial group is calling “malicious” and “saddening.” “Especially at this time of year,” said Paul Lauzon, president of the Windsor Veterans Memorial Services Committee . “It’s very frustrating.”  “Especially at this time of year,” said Paul Lauzon, president of the Windsor Veterans Memorial Services Committee . “It’s very frustrating.

+ A poignant tradition that started in Edmonton in 2011 has spread to even more Canadian cities this year. No Stone Left Alone will hold remembrance ceremonies in more than 55 communities, getting closer to its goal to have a student place a poppy on the headstone of every Canadian who has

The No Stone Left Alone Memorial Foundation is hosting remembrance ceremonies in 18 communities across the country this year, from Victoria to Halifax.

No Stone Left Alone events are expanding across the country, says co-ordinator Randall Purvis, but they’ve had excellent support from the school system in Alberta.

“All across the country we’ve had great support, but right across the superintendent level, at the trustee level in Alberta, we’ve been very blessed for them to be our partners in what we do,” Purvis said.

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a person walking down a street:  Merissa Merani, nine, places a poppy on a war veteran’s headstone on Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the Ninth annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans.  © Larry Wong Merissa Merani, nine, places a poppy on a war veteran’s headstone on Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the Ninth annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans. a little boy that is standing in the grass:  Coltir Bucci, seven, places a poppy on a war veteran’s headstone on Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the ninth annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans.  © Larry Wong Coltir Bucci, seven, places a poppy on a war veteran’s headstone on Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Hundreds of students from Edmonton area schools attended the ninth annual No Stone Left Alone remembrance ceremony at Beechmount Cemetery in Edmonton. The annual commemoration ceremony is held every November to honour the sacrifice and service of Canada’s military by students and placing poppies on the headstones of war veterans.

Refugee group's poppy project lands amid Cherry bombshell .
Even before longtime Hockey Night in Canada personality Don Cherry made the divisive on-air comments that got him fired, an Ottawa group that helps newcomers settle here had already decided to ask "those people," as Cherry called them, why they choose to wear the poppy on Remembrance Day. On Monday, Refugee613 posted a sample of their answers on the group's Facebook page."Canada has given us so much, wearing the poppy is a thank you to a nation who respects people regardless of their ethnicity, religion or nationality," said Salim, one of the participants."We suffered the same pain when we lost our sons in the war," wrote Hala.

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