Canada: 'Everything was gone': Vancouver woman left in the dark about bank account fraud - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Canada 'Everything was gone': Vancouver woman left in the dark about bank account fraud

16:45  15 november  2019
16:45  15 november  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

China urges re-elected Canadian government to free Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou

  China urges re-elected Canadian government to free Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou China urges re-elected Canadian government to free Huawei executive Meng WanzhouGeng Shuang, a spokesman at the ministry, made the comment at a regular press briefing.

I left the branch feeling physically sick.” The bank has declined all liability and told the couple they must to go to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). In each case the fraudsters exploited a little-known but significant flaw in the banking system – the name on a bank account does not have to

Action Fraud says it cannot provide updates within three months of a complaint. Lloyds Bank says it cannot deal direct with me, and HSBC has passed In the meantime, you have both been left in legal and regulatory limbo. In CC’s case, Brewin Dolphin maintains its system was not compromised and

Janet Walmsley looking at the camera: Vancouver actor Janet Walmsley says Scotiabank shared few details with her after nearly $17,000 went missing from her family's bank and credit card accounts — and was then mysteriously returned. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Vancouver actor Janet Walmsley says Scotiabank shared few details with her after nearly $17,000 went missing from her family's bank and credit card accounts — and was then mysteriously returned.

Janet Walmsley lost her savings — only to have it returned nearly a month later — without any explanation from her bank

After nearly $17,000 disappeared from the Vancouver woman's bank account, Walmsley says investigators told her they believe a thief used her personal information to make off with thousands, but she doesn't know how the culprit accomplished it.

Scammers 'spoofing' more than a dozen federal government departments to defraud Canadians

  Scammers 'spoofing' more than a dozen federal government departments to defraud Canadians Scam artists are using phone numbers from more than a dozen federal government departments to defraud Canadians — making it look as if the calls are coming from legitimate government agencies and police departments — CBC News has learned. Some of the calls tell potential victims that their social insurance numbers have been compromised. Others are told that they owe the government money and are in legal trouble.To deceive potential victims who examine the numbers on incoming calls, the scammers "spoof" their calls so that they display the phone numbers of the relevant federal government departments.

The Bristol woman , who had spent several weeks emailing him, working out the minutiae of the planned renovations, was so happy it Earlier in the week credit reference agency Experian appeared to confirm the problem is getting worse as it reported a “renewed surge in current account fraud ”, and

Elderly victims have been left without retirement funds, and a teenager who held an account for six He asked her to log into her online banking and in the background Alex could hear the sounds of a It was meant to be my safety net and something to leave my children. 'When I realised it was gone I sat

It all started when the 64-year-old Vancouver actor  was coming off a bad cold and  decided to hit the drug store for some medication last month. But when she went to pay — her debit card was declined.

"I went, 'Boy that's strange,' because I knew there was money in the account."

It was only the next day, Oct. 23, that she began to comprehend the scope of what had happened.

"I went to our online banking ...  couldn't get in."

Calls to Scotiabank's customer service and fraud departments provided her with little insight, she says, except that her account was in trouble. She discovered they were tapped dry only after a visit to her local branch. 

Approximately $16,800 of the family's money was withdrawn in the span of a day, each transaction occurring in Regina, Sask. — far from Walmsley's rented apartment in Vancouver's Kitsilano neighbourhood.

Meet Deborah Oguntoyinbo — accused of being a 'professional' and 'prolific' identity thief

  Meet Deborah Oguntoyinbo — accused of being a 'professional' and 'prolific' identity thief A CBC News investigation has uncovered details about a Toronto woman police call a “prolific” identity thief who has left a trail of shattered lives and destroyed credit profiles. A CBC News investigation has uncovered details about Oguntoyinbo, who is currently facing more than 50 fraud-related charges in Toronto as well as nearby York, Peel and Halton regions, according to court records. The charges relate to the alleged thefts of identities belonging to at least 20 people since 2017 alone. But there could be more, York Regional Police Sgt. Andy Pattenden told CBC News.

Aside from that, my bank , Lloyds, has a fraud team which monitors accounts for any dodgy dealings which may suggest fraud (as I learned at 2 am one dark morning when paying for a New York hotel stay). The company also falsely claimed the equipment was made in the United States.

The fraud department calls the customer to find out what is going on. In the current state, most organizations have their fraud and AML departments separate, but the trend is moving toward greater integration due to limited resources and the weakened economy.

a person sitting at a desk in front of a computer: Janet Walmsley has a trust account for her daughter Jenny Storey, 26, who lives with autism. That account was also drained of its funds in a bank fraud. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Janet Walmsley has a trust account for her daughter Jenny Storey, 26, who lives with autism. That account was also drained of its funds in a bank fraud.

"Everything was gone. All the money out of chequing. All the money out of our savings... They maxed [our credit cards] to the hilt."

Walmsley says the thieves also drained a basic account set up as a trust for her daughter Jenny Story, 26, who lives with autism.

Walmsley says she would expect unusual banking activity taking place in a different city to trigger an alert from her bank, but she received nothing from Scotiabank to tip her off.

She also suggests that Scotiabank staff fell short several times during the resulting investigation: repeatedly asking for police files that had already been shared with bank staff, offering no updates on the investigation or whether the family's money would be returned.

Ontario police warn of 'SIM swapping' fraud

  Ontario police warn of 'SIM swapping' fraud Ontario residents are being warned about a relatively new kind of fraud called "SIM swapping" in which criminals steal personal information via mobile phones in order to gain access to bank accounts. A "fraudster" will impersonate a person and call their mobile service provider to report a lost or stolen phone, said Ontario Provincial Police and the Ontario Serious Fraud Office.

A woman with an unfamiliar name (which it feels unfair to mention) had, without warning, paid £250,000 into my current account . It was as I'd feared: I'd have to give everything back – although they In the process of typing a sort code, the bank explained, this mysterious woman had pressed "6" when

Had there been an allegation of fraud ? Is the bank punishing him for contacting the media and kicking up a fuss? (At one point while the cash was missing We worked hard to rectify the matter as quickly as possible and can confirm the funds in the accounts are now available. We have apologised for the

Customers should expect full transparency

Technology writer Graham Williams of Vancouver says consumers should expect nothing less than full transparency from their bank when dealing with issues involving identity fraud.

"I don't think anyone out there has ever thought to themselves 'I have too much information' about my situation," he told CBC.

"If you are in a position where you are in customer service ... really take that time to put yourself in the customer's shoes".

Williams says consumers can be proactive by subscribing to an identity-monitoring service which sends a notification if someone has accessed your account or tried to run a credit check in your name. 

Problem suddenly solved

After sharing her story with CBC, but before CBC contacted ScotiaBank, Walmsley discovered the money suddenly had been returned to her account. Her daughter's trust money was also returned, and the bank gave her funds to pay off her two maxed-out credit cards.  

"I was speechless. It's one of those feelings where you're so happy but you're kind of in disbelief because it took so long for this to happen."

Alleged 'prolific' Toronto identity thief is wanted by Quebec police

  Alleged 'prolific' Toronto identity thief is wanted by Quebec police A Toronto woman who police say is a "professional" and "prolific" identity thief is also wanted by Quebec police. Deborah Oguntoyinbo is already facing more than 50 charges in the Toronto area relating to identity thefts and frauds in four jurisdictions.Deborah Oguntoyinbo, 26, is already facing more than 50 charges relating to identity thefts and frauds in four jurisdictions in the Greater Toronto Area.

Gone in 60 Seconds was a fraud scheme uncovered in 2012 involving the theft of over million from Citibank using cash advance kiosks at casinos located in Southern California and Nevada. After garnering a sizable sum of money, allegedly illegally, from cash-advance kiosks

Getting a bank account was one of the first things we had to get sorted in Vancouver . Whereas in the UK, the banks seem grateful to have your money, in Canada, it seems like they think they’re doing you a massive favour so they try charging for everything .

"I feel I deserve the decency and respect to tell me why this money was put back in — but also what the investigation brought about. Why did they give me the money-back? Did they find the fraudulent behaviour?"

a man smiling for the camera: Graham Williams says customers have a right to expect full transparency from their banks in instances of apparent identity fraud. © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Graham Williams says customers have a right to expect full transparency from their banks in instances of apparent identity fraud.

Scotiabank offers regret

In a written statement, Scotiabank spokesperson Doug Johnson told CBC "we sincerely regret the position this customer was put in, and [we] thoroughly review any instance in which customers feel we have not met their expectations."

He said the bank invests significantly in fraud detection and equips its customers with tools such as Scotia InfoAlerts, which helps customers "identify unauthorized transactions as they happen."

With files from Belle Puri

Woman feels 'violated' after bank cancels her debit card number, gives it to a stranger .
A Toronto woman says she feels "violated" out after TD Canada Trust mistakenly assigned her debit card number to someone else and cancelled her card. Mila Mayall says she was worried her personal information had been compromised.   After dinner one night last month, Mila Mayall tried to pay for the meal using her debit card, but the transaction wouldn't go through. So she went to a convenience store to take out cash, but that didn't work either. It was only when she called TD Canada Trust that she was told her debit card had been cancelled and her number reassigned.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 22
This is interesting!