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Canada So you went to the climate strike … now what?

18:15  15 november  2019
18:15  15 november  2019 Source:   vancouversun.com

All those scandals during the federal election? Nobody really cared, new data shows

  All those scandals during the federal election? Nobody really cared, new data shows OTTAWA — The election wasn’t about Justin Trudeau’s blackface, Andrew Scheer’s employment history, or any of the other scandals that blew up during the campaign. It wasn’t even about the issues. On voting day, it all came down to brand loyalty. “Not many voters were moved by what happened in the election. I think it was an election that did not have a huge issues focus,” said Craig Worden, president of Pollara Strategic Insights who conducted the survey for Clean Energy Canada, a Vancouver-based think tank focused on the transition to renewable energy. “There was a bit of ADD to this election,” he said. Here are the figures that tell the tale of the election.

If you didn’t go to the climate strike and are now feeling conflicted because of it, don’t be. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to get involved to support your What’s even more important is having your life habits and choices reflect what you believe in. As environmental policy executive and analyst Lynn

So you went to the strike , now what ? Here's how you can keep fighting for climate justice. Last Friday, millions of young people around the world made history as they took part in the global Youth Climate Strike . While the crowd sizes are still being determined, it is estimated nearly 4 million people

a close up of a busy city street: Gumdrop Ltd., a U.K.-based company, has developed bright pink recycling bins for chewing gum. Gumdrop Ltd., a U.K.-based company, has developed bright pink recycling bins for chewing gum.

Editor’s note: The opinions in this article are the author’s, as published by our content partner, and do not necessarily represent the views of MSN or Microsoft.

September showcased the biggest climate mobilization in history: a record 7.6 million people took to the streets in support of action against climate change. It was a phenomenon of inspiring proportions, watching people of all ages across the world step forward to make their voices heard. If you didn’t go, you’ve most likely heard about it.

But perhaps you did go to one of the strikes; you may have even made a sign with a clever message saying: “It’s getting hot in here, so take off all your coals,” or “We’re rising up so that the sea level won’t!”

Climate Strike Is The Word Of The Year, According To Collins Dictionary

  Climate Strike Is The Word Of The Year, According To Collins Dictionary You can thank Greta Thunberg for this one. Collins Dictionaries released their 2019 list of words that have seen increased usage, and “climate strike” topped the list. They say it “embodies a positive response to a grave crisis,” referring to climate change. The word has seen a 100-fold increase in Collins’ English database this year over last, the dictionary says. The first climate strike took place in late November 2015 while world leaders were meeting in Paris for the United Nations Climate Change Conference.

Causes event in Winnipeg, MB, Canada by Our Time - Winnipeg on Tuesday, October 1 2019 with 147 people interested and 28 people going . Now What ? Public. · Hosted by Our Time - Winnipeg.

"What we want to know is, are we even going to be here if no one's paying attention, if no one's taking action? "Our situation right now is really dire. It's a big crisis and we can't just let it off the hook for a long time. It's affecting our life now and it's going to increasingly affect it in the future, so I need them

If you didn’t go to the climate strike and are now feeling conflicted because of it, don’t be. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to get involved to support your beliefs, but going to an event is just one of many things you could be doing. What’s even more important is having your life habits and choices reflect what you believe in.

As environmental policy executive and analyst Lynn Scarlett stated: “The biggest barrier to tackling climate change isn’t technical — it’s our willingness to act.” All human habits affect the environment one way or another. Furthermore, most of our habits are so small that we don’t give them a second thought. Small actions that take no extra effort can add up to a positive larger overall impact.

Take brushing your teeth for instance. We do it (theoretically) twice a day, using about five litres of water in total, but if we turned the tap off in between brushes we could cut that down to a litre of water. We have a decent recycling system in Canada, but what about recycling gum? Gum is made out of synthetic polymers that are pleasantly chewy, but also highly non-biodegradable. Often discarded onto the ground, it is the second-largest source of litter after cigarette butts. The U.K. has implemented the “Gumdrop,” a bin made from recycled gum for gum disposal. It cut down gum litter by 46 per cent within the first 12 weeks, and with results like that, we should strongly consider launching that system here.

Ontario elementary teachers to start work-to-rule campaign Nov. 26

  Ontario elementary teachers to start work-to-rule campaign Nov. 26 TORONTO — Ontario's elementary teachers will start a work-to-rule campaign on Nov. 26 that they say will not affect students, but is just the first phase in potentially escalating job action. The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario says their action will target ministry and school board administrative tasks. Members are being told not to complete Term 1 report cards, not to participate in any professional learning from their school board or the ministry outside of school hours, and not to do any online training by the ministry.

I’m striking because what seems so terribly clear to me- that lives have already been lost to the climate crisis, that if we do not take action now there will be an unfathomable human Organizers now estimate 1 million people have gone on strike worldwide, to protest inaction on climate change.

The September 2019 climate strikes , also known as the Global Week for Future, were a series of international strikes and protests to demand action be taken to address climate change

Many cafés have switched over from plastic cups to paper, and some even encourage customers to bring their own mug. Despite this switch, paper cups are still a one-time-use item, and when you add that up every day, the numbers are astronomical. This directly relates to Jevon’s Paradox (Alcott) which describes how efficiency measures are counterproductive, as our push for consuming green items is simultaneously a push for consumption. This is very true, yet we are not going to become green overnight. It’s going to take time, awareness and effort, and our way to get there starts by replacing plastic with paper until we can find something better.

It can be easy to disregard these small efforts as un-impactful in the big picture. But that’s such a glass-half-empty way of looking at it. Yes, industries have enormous influence and power, but our buying power can dictate their actions. Think more conscientiously about what you consume, and if enough people start voicing their opinions industries will be economically inclined to make some changes.

Ontario high school teachers, education workers vote in favour of a strike

  Ontario high school teachers, education workers vote in favour of a strike TORONTO — The union representing Ontario's high school teachers says its members have voted 95 per cent in favour of a strike. The Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation says the result gives it an "overwhelming" mandate to take job action if necessary. The union also represents education workers who voted 92 per cent in favour of taking strike action. The OSSTF is already in a legal strike position as of today, though it's also requiredThe Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation says the result gives it an "overwhelming" mandate to take job action if necessary.

Greta Thunberg and her fellow climate change strikers around the world urge adults to join their fight.

The Learning Network|Are You Going to a Youth Climate Strike ? Will you be attending a local youth climate strike ? Why or why not? If you go , will you be penalized for missing classes? What do you think of New York City’s decision to let public school students skip classes on Friday without penalties?

Becoming sustainable is an ongoing process, and we have to keep that in mind as we continue to strive for that goal.

Remember the big picture. We live in a part of the world that is sufficiently supplied with food, water and amenities, but we must also be aware that what we take for granted is rare in other parts of the world. Our small actions are not just for us, but the rest of the world as well. Think about your choices the next time you go to plug in your three devices overnight, to drive five minutes up the road to pick up containers of takeout, to reinvent your wardrobe or the next time you brush your teeth. All these small actions are important; they speak to something larger, and ideally one day all of this action will transform into policy so that we can truly become sustainable.

Kai Vorland is a fourth-year geography student at the University of B.C. whose area of focus is in environment and sustainability.

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Thunberg to guest-edit BBC radio news programme .
Thunberg to guest-edit BBC radio news programmeThe 16-year-old climate change campaigner will be one of five prominent personalities invited to take over the "Today" programme between Christmas and New Year, the British Broadcasting Corporation said.

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