•   
  •   
  •   

Canada Support programs, housing make women safer when fleeing violence, say advocates

18:50  16 november  2019
18:50  16 november  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

City adamant shelters are not full, while video shows staff saying they're 'at capacity'

  City adamant shelters are not full, while video shows staff saying they're 'at capacity' Senior managers are adamant occupancy levels at shelters throughout the city are below capacity, even though advocates maintain that people are regularly being turning away.Pastor Doug Johnson Hatlem of Waterloo, Ont., who has years of experience doing outreach work in Toronto, filmed staff at the city's shelter referral office on Peter Street on Thursday night.

Housing lawyers and charities said a lack of social housing and poor council decisions meant women were increasingly being put in temporary accommodation The 36-year-old fled domestic violence with her two children and has been in the unsuitable property for two years. Homes for Haringey, the

London mayor Sadiq Khan has made a good start with his strategy for London, but much more needs to be done.

a person standing in a dark room: D.C. is one of many women in Metro Vancouver who left a violent domestic partner only to find herself without any affordable, stable housing. Advocates say emergency shelters are full, subsidized housing wait lists are long and market rents are too high for most single mothers.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation D.C. is one of many women in Metro Vancouver who left a violent domestic partner only to find herself without any affordable, stable housing. Advocates say emergency shelters are full, subsidized housing wait lists are long and market rents are too high for most single mothers. For many Metro Vancouver women escaping domestic abuse, the choice is homelessness or returning to their abuser.

As the affordability crisis makes it harder for women to take their children and flee violence, advocates are calling for more housing across B.C.

They want more emergency shelters for women to stay in the first weeks after fleeing abuse, more subsidized housing and stricter rent controls — and are calling for all levels of government to bring Vancouver's housing market into line with the wages people are paid in Metro Vancouver.

B.C. rental crisis goes far beyond impact of short-term rentals, say experts

  B.C. rental crisis goes far beyond impact of short-term rentals, say experts B.C. rental crisis goes far beyond impact of short-term rentals, say expertsRecent data from Airbnb Canada says the short-term rental company collected almost $43 million in provincial, municipal and regional taxes over the past year, which will be provided to the provincial government, regional districts and the City of Vancouver to fund housing and tourism initiatives.

Our safe house provides secure and confidential temporary housing for women and children. Our hotline advocates are available 24-hours each day to answer questions and provide Domestic Violence Support Groups. In partnership with DeKalb Legal Aid , we offer a free legal clinic one

in supportive housing and services for women and children fleeing violence will make little long-term difference without drastic measures to control housing and “We have a huge housing crisis at the moment, and what women really need after living in safe houses and second-stage houses is

But beyond housing concerns, advocates are proposing several other ways to make women's lives safer and more affordable after they escape an abusive partner.

Community-based support

Tracy Porteous, who runs the Ending Violence Association of B.C., says her research has found 100 fatalities due to domestic violence in the province between 2010 and 2016.

"One of the things that is an astonishing discovery that we've made is that not one woman died who was a client of one of these community-based advocacy programs," said Porteous.

Porteous says there are 69 community-based advocacy programs across B.C. including justice system support programs, liaison services for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence, and mental health resources.

‘It’s appalling’: Women’s advocates outraged Kelowna RCMP dismissed nearly 40% of sex assault complaints last year

  ‘It’s appalling’: Women’s advocates outraged Kelowna RCMP dismissed nearly 40% of sex assault complaints last year Cpl. Meghan Foster said the detachment is “not in a position” to explain why so many sexual assault cases were deemed unfounded by investigators in the Okanagan. “For every investigation, there are many variables — each investigation is different and we do not want to deter any other survivors from bravely coming forward to report a sexual assault,” she said in a statement.Earlier this year, the detachment came under national scrutiny after video surfaced of a Mountie aggressively questioning an Indigenous teen who was allegedly the victim of a sexual assault.

SAY offers a range of housing and housing assistance programs to eligible youth. If you would like more information about our various housing options Our services include helping youth obtain ID’s, fill out employment applications, get new clothes, find housing , and support them in meeting their

Advocates say Trump administration policies will have a particularly negative effect on undocumented women and children fleeing violence . Under the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA, immigrant victims of domestic violence can qualify for special protections.

Still, that is not enough to keep up with the demand. She says B.C. needs more community workers and programs to walk women through the process of leaving a violent home.

Supervised custody drop-off and government child support

Porteous says after women with children leave an abusive partner, they need "supervised access visits."

Oftentimes mothers face conflicting orders from the authorities. For example, social workers say protect your children from violence at all costs, but family law courts say the abusive parent needs regular access to the kids.

Lisa Rupert, director of housing services and violence prevention at the YWCA, says she is haunted by a story of a mother who was dragged into her ex's car when she was meeting him to hand their child over as part of a visitation arrangement.

Rupert says there needs to be semi-public, supervised, safe places where a mother can drop off a child and then leave before the ex-spouse arrives to pick up the child.

'Back into the closet': LGBTQ seniors face housing discrimination

  'Back into the closet': LGBTQ seniors face housing discrimination Members from Ottawa's LGBTQ community say discrimination causes some people to go "back into the closet" during their search for long-term seniors housing. A Halifax researcher is holding a focus group in the capital Tuesday as part of a Canada-wide project funded by the National Housing Strategy. The plan is to discuss the unique set of housing challenges LGBTQ people face as they age. "A lot of them, what they're telling us, is they're going back into the closet," said George Hartsgrove, chair of the Ottawa Senior Pride Network.

Housing with Support . Tenant Programs & Resources. Homelessness Services & Programs . Women Fleeing Violence . BC Housing provides SAFER subsidies to more than 17,000 senior households renting apartments in the private market, including singles, couples and people sharing a unit.

When women fleeing abuse encounter housing problems, their children bear much of the cost. Almost one out of every four people receiving homeless services was a minor child in a 1996 government survey. Poverty and housing instability are especially harmful during the earliest years of childhood

This supervision, says Rupert, should be paid for by the government or organizations — not by women.

Furthermore, Rupert says, the government should assist with child support, as many women struggling to pay rent cannot always count on their former spouses to pay up.

"I think we could go even further as a society and emulate some places in Europe where the government pays the child support, so that you know that you're getting it on a regular basis and then they try and recoup it from the non-custodial parent," she said.

a close up of a device: The housing affordability crisis is making it even harder for women to take their children and leave violence.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation The housing affordability crisis is making it even harder for women to take their children and leave violence.

Listen to the full story by The Early Edition story producer Jodie Martinson:

Where to get help:

VictimLinkBC is a toll-free, confidential, multilingual telephone service available across B.C. and the Yukon 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-800-563-0808.

Service is provided in more than 110 languages, including 17 Indigenous languages.

VictimLinkBC is TTY accessible. Call TTY at 604-875-0885; to call collect, please call the Telus Relay Service at 711. Text to 604-836-6381. Email VictimLinkBC@bc211.ca

Safe Home is a CBC Vancouver series on domestic abuse and housing affordability. It can be heard on The Early Edition at 7:10 a.m. PT starting Nov. 12 as well as local morning radio shows across the province. You can also watch for coverage on CBC Vancouver News at 6 weekdays and read stories online at cbc.ca/bc.

As more people use RVs as homes, should cities find a place for them? .
Some advocates say providing RV dwellers with a safe space would be beneficial. Others warn it would just pour limited resources into another stop-gap housing measure instead of focusing on building permanent homes.  'Creative solutions'Mike Musgrove, executive director of the Surrey Urban Mission, often hears from people who live in their RVs.Musgrove thinks offering them a safe space to live would be "incredible." © Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Metro Vancouver RV Parks like this one in Surrey, B.C., have years-long wait-lists.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!