Canada: Couple awarded nearly $3M after blueberry crop destroyed at foreclosed farm they bought - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Canada Couple awarded nearly $3M after blueberry crop destroyed at foreclosed farm they bought

17:57  19 november  2019
17:57  19 november  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Doing right for the country: The Canadian War Museum's mission to save Canada's Victoria Crosses

  Doing right for the country: The Canadian War Museum's mission to save Canada's Victoria Crosses For Valour. That’s the simple inscription on the Commonwealth’s highest military medal, but it carries with it the weight of almost 100 stories of Canadian bravery. The Victoria Cross is not an elaborate medal. It’s a simple square cross, made of a bronze alloy with a crown and a lion over the inscription. Since it was first created in 1856 it has been awarded to 99 Canadians. The cross has been given to Canadian soldiers for sacrifices on the beaches of Dieppe, the fields of Passchendaele or at Hill 70. They were given to aviators who stayed inside burning planes to free trapped colleagues and a captain who moored his boat in a hostile harbour even as it caught fire.

Blueberry Seeds = 201280g & Quality Fertilizer = 50320g is what I had to buy . One BlueberryGold is worth 133g, BlueberrySilver is worth 110g, BlueberryNormal is worth I am on my way home after work, excited to harvest my first blueberry crop that I setup yesterday and I see this. It's pretty crazy.

While blueberries are tolerant of shade, better crops are obtained in the sun. At the same time, they should not be exposed to harsh, drying winds. These pink berries can be planted in nearly every climate. ‘Pink Champagne’: Another pink variety full of antioxidants and sweeter than blue blueberries .

A file photo of ripe blueberries on a farm© Getty A file photo of ripe blueberries on a farm

When Malkiat and Satwant Baring were preparing to buy a 60-acre farm in Langley, B.C., in July 2017, "the blueberry bushes were laden with ripening fruit," according to B.C. Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Gomery's decision.

The couple planned to immediately harvest the berries, but by the time they took ownership of the foreclosed farm, the produce was nearly all ruined — the fields destroyed by the herbicide, Roundup.

The Barings took the previous owners of the $5.5 million farm, brothers Zora and Harminder Grewal, to court. And they won — they've been awarded nearly $3 million in the case.

Harvest a struggle in Alberta, Saskatchewan, but a miracle in Manitoba

  Harvest a struggle in Alberta, Saskatchewan, but a miracle in Manitoba Winter's icy fingers have touched most of the Prairies since late September, causing havoc and frustration for many farmers trying to get crops off their fields. Dave Reid, who farms near Cremona, northwest of Calgary, estimates 20 to 25 per cent of his canola is still in the ground under layers of snow. Dave Reid, who farms near Cremona, northwest of Calgary, estimates 20 to 25 per cent of his canola is still in the ground under layers of snow. And it may have to stay there.

In Washington, he starts with blueberry farms in May, then travels east, ending with vineyards in the Yakima Valley and Columbia Basin through the fall. This season she permitted nearly 300 recreational falconers in the state. Thompson says she's noticed an uptick in this style of pest control.

Our blueberry farm is conveniently located just off Exit 28 of the Atlantic City Expressway. " Blueberry Bill is one of the good guys! He strives to grow the very best blueberries that he can and lets just say the proof is in the size and flavor of his crop .

What Gomery describes in his ruling is a "vindictive" act carried out by the Grewal brothers in the days leading up to the completion of the sale. He called the spraying of the herbicide wilful and malicious.

The defendants denied spraying herbicide on the crop, and entered no evidence in the case.

But Gomery concluded that nobody else could have plausibly killed the plants.

"The only apparent motive was vindictive," wrote Gomery. "They pointlessly destroyed an entire crop of blueberries and the damage done to the plants will be felt for more than a decade."

'A ruse to avoid suspicion'

"Who sprayed the herbicides on the blueberry field?" asks Gomery in his decision. "The timing and circumstances of the spraying point in the direction of Zora and Harminder Grewal."

‘Harvest from hell’: Alberta farmers demanding action from government

  ‘Harvest from hell’: Alberta farmers demanding action from government Alberta farmers are asking for aggressive action from the government on serious economic hardships following this year’s ‘harvest from hell’.Poor harvest conditions, trade disputes and a looming federal carbon tax are all weighing on the agriculture industry.

Growing Blueberries this year? It's easier than you think. Avoid these 4 beginner mistakes and you'll be on your way to a bountiful crop ! After their first season, blueberries are very low-maintenance and will produce buckets full within a couple of years!

Blueberries are perennial flowering plants with blue – or purple–colored berries . They are classified in the section Cyanococcus within the genus Vaccinium.

Gomery said the Grewals were the only ones who had assured access to the farm and to the large quantities of water required to make the 15,000 litres of herbicide solution sprayed on the fields.

They had access to the tractor and sprayer and had used the equipment in the days before the sale completed to apply a pesticide, malathion, on the fields.

"I agree with the plaintiffs' counsel that spraying malathion in the afternoon was a ruse to avoid suspicion," wrote Gomery, saying it was likely that the brothers continued spraying the fields into the night, but began applying the blueberry-killing Roundup once the pesticide spraying was complete.

The question of motive

"The most troubling aspect of the evidence is the question of motive," said Gomery. "Why would the defendants do such a thing? This only takes one so far. Why would anyone do such a thing? — yet someone did."

According to the ruling, Harminder Grewal had tried to talk Satwant Baring out of buying the house a week before the final sale, in what Gomery called a warning — if not a threat.

Millions of acres of Canadian canola freeze, compounding 'harvest from hell'

  Millions of acres of Canadian canola freeze, compounding 'harvest from hell' Millions of acres of Canadian canola freeze, compounding 'harvest from hell'Canola is renowned as Canada's most profitable crop, exported to China, Japan and Mexico to make vegetable oil and animal feed.

Dear Call Box: I always buy frozen blueberries from the grocery store, but this year I'd like to pick my Dear G.S.: There wasn't a bumper crop of the lush dusky berries this year. A late freeze after Their Dowless Blueberry Farm is at 7010 Ricker Road. Irma Jane Dowless said they hope to open to

In HGTV's series 'We Bought the Farm ', families wishing for wide-open spaces head to the great outdoors to They 're ready to crack open the books to learn about crops , cows and A couple is ready to leave their corporate life in suburban Manchester, New Hampshire, to farm in the Merrimack

Grewal told Baring that there was a dispute between the Grewals, including a third brother, and that "it is bad to get involved in somebody else's dispute."

'Their just deserts'

Gomery awarded the Barings $2,796,400 in a price abatement for the farm, based on the loss of revenue for the damaged crops, the cost to rehabilitate the farm, and expected future losses until 2028.

He also granted the plaintiffs punitive damages.

"In my judgment, an award of $150,000 is sufficient to denounce the defendants' misconduct and give them their just deserts," said the judge.

Do you have more to add to this story? Email rafferty.baker@cbc.ca

Follow Rafferty Baker on Twitter: @raffertybaker

Moose are eating N.L. harvests, say farmers, and provincial rules aren't helping .
Farmers in central Newfoundland say the persistent agricultural pest has done major damage this growing season, and a recent provincial ban on shooting moose at night isn't helping the situation.With decades of farming under his belt, Dwight Eveleigh is used to a moose or two occasionally nibbling at his crops.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 45
This is interesting!