Canada: Kenney to seek 'common ground' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation - - PressFrom - Canada
  •   
  •   
  •   

Canada Kenney to seek 'common ground' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation

00:10  23 november  2019
00:10  23 november  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Alberta premier says proposal to pull out of CPP due to hostility from others

  Alberta premier says proposal to pull out of CPP due to hostility from others KANANASKIS, Alta. — Premier Jason Kenney is defending his idea that Alberta could pull out of the federal pension plan by saying times have changed. He says bold action is needed because of unprecedented hostility from the federal and some provincial governments that are actively blocking Alberta's economic future. Kenney didn't campaign in the spring election on leaving the Canada Pension Plan and setting up a provincial one, but says Albertans would get a say through a referendum.On the weekend, Kenney announced a panel to research and hold public meetings on whether Alberta should move toward a more independent role within Canada.

The poll also found that Albertans were most in favour of creating a regional party to represent the interests of Western Canada, which Reid believes is far more likely than actual separation . “It’s similar in many respects to what happened in Quebec back in the 1970s with the formation of the Parti

SEEK is Australia’s number one employment marketplace. Find jobs and career related information or recruit the ideal candidate. Why settle? Skip to content. Try the SEEK app to find your dream job faster.

After a poll that found Quebecers would feel the most pleased to see Alberta separate from Canada, Premier Jason Kenney said Friday the two provinces have more in common than some may think.

"We are friends of Quebec," Kenney told reporters. "We are traditional allies of Quebec. We are allies in defending provincial jurisdiction."

His comments Friday came in response to a question about an Abacus Data poll released earlier in the week that found "substantial majorities" of Canadians in every province — except Quebec — would be "unhappy" or "very unhappy" to see Alberta separate from Canada.

In Quebec, 55 per cent of survey respondents said they would be "happy" or "OK" to see Alberta leave the country.

Alberta independence ideas would increase costs, says Calgary mayor

  Alberta independence ideas would increase costs, says Calgary mayor Calgary's mayor says ideas being floated to give Alberta more independence from the federal government would be costly. Naheed Nenshi says wresting control from Ottawa over things like pensions and policing would have to come with a big enough benefit to justify the expense. He says his focus in running the city is making sure services are delivered as efficiently as possible. Premier Jason Kenney's United Conservative government has formed aNaheed Nenshi says wresting control from Ottawa over things like pensions and policing would have to come with a big enough benefit to justify the expense.

New poll says majority of Conservative voters and people from Quebec feel “unfavourable” for least one minority group. Regionally, 57 per cent of respondents from Quebec felt unfavourable toward at least one of the groups, followed by 45 per cent from Alberta , 39 per cent from Atlantic Canada, 35

But the new Forum poll reveals much about Canada’s gay community and how the community Canadians living in Manitoba or Saskatchewan and in Alberta are least likely to know someone who is People living in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta were also the least supportive of same-sex

Jason Kenney et al. looking at the camera: Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks to reporters in Calgary on Friday.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks to reporters in Calgary on Friday.

Kenney, who has been in Texas for most of the week, said he hadn't seen the poll but he hoped to quell regional tensions when he speaks with Quebec Premier François Legault later in the day. The two premiers had a phone call scheduled for Friday afternoon.

The Alberta premier blamed federal Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet for escalating regional tensions and said he hoped to smooth things over in his conversation with Legault.

"I don't want to feed into the kind of division being seeded by the leader of the Bloc Québécois," Kenney said. "I want to find common ground in the federation that gets us a fair deal and I think we can do that."

‘Pick a lane’: Kenney calls out Quebec’s use of equalization payments after Blanchet’s meeting with Trudeau

  ‘Pick a lane’: Kenney calls out Quebec’s use of equalization payments after Blanchet’s meeting with Trudeau Premier Jason Kenney said Alberta has paid $600 billion in equalization payments since 1960, adding the province has contributed $23 billion each year for the past five years. "And yet we are going through an economic crisis," he said. "All we ask is a little bit of fairness -- we’re not asking for a special deal, we’re asking for a fair deal.”READ MORE: Premier Jason Kenney announces ‘Fair Deal Panel’ to advance Alberta’s interests, like pipelines The comments come on the heels of Kenney's announcement of a "fair deal" panel on Saturday, which is aimed at pushing forward with Alberta's interests.

Over the next two weeks at Common Ground we are going to look at the idea of money, mammon, taxes, images, and finally, what it means to live into the socio-political world that Jesus invites his followers into. We hope you join us at the Silk Mill or in a House Church over the next two weeks as

Common ground is the overlap between the positions of parties that may otherwise disagree. " Finding common ground " is a technique people use to facilitate interpersonal relationships. To find common ground between parties, participants must search for signals of recognition

Kenney also said he was pleased by Quebec Finance Minister Eric Girard's recent support for reforming Canada's fiscal stabilization program.

"Quebec supports Alberta's proposal that the federal government make the necessary improvements to this program," Girard wrote in the Financial Post. "Indeed, Quebec wants Alberta, Saskatchewan and all Canadian provinces to prosper."

Alberta received about $250 million from the fiscal stabilization program in 2016, but the federal formula for calculating payouts has been criticized in the province as being outdated and poorly suited to addressing recessions related to downturns in oil and gas.

Under the current rules, a province can apply for financial assistance if its non-resource revenues decline by more than five per cent from one year to the next.

Payments are also capped based on a province's population, with a maximum of $60 per person, and assistance is not automatic; it must be approved on a case-by-case basis by the federal government.

'Reject this arrogance': Jason Kenney has message for Quebecers amid dispute with Bloc leader

  'Reject this arrogance': Jason Kenney has message for Quebecers amid dispute with Bloc leader Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is urging Quebecers to reject the “arrogance” of Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet. Kenney and Blanchet have been sparring with each other after the Bloc leader this week made dismissive remarks about Alberta’s oil industry. Kenney returned to the fray on Friday when he addressed the Rural Municipalities of Alberta Fall Convention in Edmonton. “We Albertans are friends with Quebecers,” said Kenney. He said Kenney and Blanchet have been sparring with each other after the Bloc leader this week made dismissive remarks about Alberta’s oil industry.

The 2008–09 Canadian parliamentary dispute was a political dispute during the 40th Canadian Parliament. It was triggered by the expressed intention of the opposition parties

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney 's reaction to the new cabinet lineup was far more positive. Congratulations to all of those sworn into the federal Cabinet today.

The Government of Alberta hopes to find common ground with the federal government to create jobs & growth, in

Survey finds most Albertans oppose separation

As an upstart western separatist party organizes candidates to run in the next federal election, the Abacus survey found three-quarters of Albertans feel their province is treated "unfairly" in its relationship with the rest of the country.

At the same time, however, three-quarters said they would vote to remain a part of Canada in a hypothetical referendum on separation.

Kenney said Albertans continue to be frustrated with numerous federal polices but he's also been encouraged by recent conversations with members of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's newly appointed cabinet.

He said he spoke Thursday with Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland and Jim Carr, the Winnipeg South Centre MP who has been designated as the federal government's special representative to the Prairies.

"And I hope to be meeting with the prime minister in early December," Kenney said, "to convey to him personally what I've said in writing to him, which is that if he's really committed to healing the wounds and addressing the divisions, we need more than words. We need actions."

Abacus says the survey was conducted online with 3,000 adults from Nov. 12 to 17 and results were weighted according to census data "to ensure that the sample matched Canada's population according to age, gender, educational attainment, and region."

For comparison purposes, a probability-based sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of plus or minus 1.8 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. The margins of error would be higher on provincial results or other subsets of the main sample.

Alberta's Kenney, deputy PM Freeland meet in Edmonton to find common ground .
EDMONTON — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland met up in Edmonton to try to find some common ground in a region that shut out the Liberals in the federal election. Freeland, also named intergovernmental affairs minister in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's new cabinet, says she is here to listen and work to find solutions with Alberta. She is also to meet Tuesday with Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe. Voters inFreeland, also named intergovernmental affairs minister in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's new cabinet, says she is here to listen and work to find solutions with Alberta.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!