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Canada Kenney to seek 'common ground' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation

00:10  23 november  2019
00:10  23 november  2019 Source:   cbc.ca

Can anything stop Jason Kenney? Alberta premier rides high approval rating as his party gathers for convention

  Can anything stop Jason Kenney? Alberta premier rides high approval rating as his party gathers for convention EDMONTON — On Monday, Premier Jason Kenney stood beside the Toronto MP and Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland in his office at the Alberta legislature and warmly welcomed her, an “Alberta girl” from Peace River, Alta., back home. That was after earlier this month, in a speech before conservative faithful, condemning the “record of assaults” of Freeland’s own Liberal government on Alberta. This is part of Kenney’s skill as a politician. He knows his audience and can be a peacemaker behind doors while delivering a rousing barn burner of a speech in public. He, in the words of country legend Kenny Rogers, knows when to hold ‘em.

After a poll that found Quebecers would feel the most pleased to see Alberta separate from Canada, Premier Jason Kenney said Friday In Quebec, 55 per cent of survey respondents said they would be "happy" or " OK " to see Alberta leave the country. How survey respondents said they would feel about

Kenney also said while the renewed sense of alienation in Alberta is real and should not be ignored, most people in the province don't favour separation . Kenney to seek ' common ground ' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation .

After a poll that found Quebecers would feel the most pleased to see Alberta separate from Canada, Premier Jason Kenney said Friday the two provinces have more in common than some may think.

"We are friends of Quebec," Kenney told reporters. "We are traditional allies of Quebec. We are allies in defending provincial jurisdiction."

His comments Friday came in response to a question about an Abacus Data poll released earlier in the week that found "substantial majorities" of Canadians in every province — except Quebec — would be "unhappy" or "very unhappy" to see Alberta separate from Canada.

In Quebec, 55 per cent of survey respondents said they would be "happy" or "OK" to see Alberta leave the country.

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  John Ivison: Jason Kenney needs to play it cool to deal with Wexit heat What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate. Eastern Liberals like Kathleen Wynne on CTV’s Question Period spent the weekend accusing Alberta Premier Jason Kenney of “fanning the flames” of Western separatism. Those closer to the action could only shake their heads and point out that Kenney is Canada’s best hope for taking the sting out of a Wexit movement that is becoming ever more venomous. Sources close to Kenney note his frustration that he is being denounced as perfidious by people who should know better.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is dismissing concerns over a new law that fired the man who was investigating wrongdoing within the United Conservative Kenney to seek ' common ground ' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation . Alberta energy minister 'very encouraged' after

Alberta seeks to lessen financial hit of Supreme Court ruling on orphan wells. The Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors recently predicted just nine more wells will be drilled in Kenney to seek ' common ground ' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation .

Jason Kenney et al. looking at the camera: Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks to reporters in Calgary on Friday.© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks to reporters in Calgary on Friday.

Kenney, who has been in Texas for most of the week, said he hadn't seen the poll but he hoped to quell regional tensions when he speaks with Quebec Premier François Legault later in the day. The two premiers had a phone call scheduled for Friday afternoon.

The Alberta premier blamed federal Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet for escalating regional tensions and said he hoped to smooth things over in his conversation with Legault.

"I don't want to feed into the kind of division being seeded by the leader of the Bloc Québécois," Kenney said. "I want to find common ground in the federation that gets us a fair deal and I think we can do that."

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Kenney likes to boast about how his party won a "historic mandate," with more than a million votes in the April election. For Kenney , that number is both amulet and Kenney to seek ' common ground ' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation . Opinion. What's the deal with Alberta ?

More than anything, Lalli would like to see city council find a longer term tax solution for business owners rather than lurching along year by year. Kenney to seek ' common ground ' as poll finds Quebecers most OK with Alberta separation . 'No excitement at all' as oilpatch interest wanes for

Kenney also said he was pleased by Quebec Finance Minister Eric Girard's recent support for reforming Canada's fiscal stabilization program.

"Quebec supports Alberta's proposal that the federal government make the necessary improvements to this program," Girard wrote in the Financial Post. "Indeed, Quebec wants Alberta, Saskatchewan and all Canadian provinces to prosper."

Alberta received about $250 million from the fiscal stabilization program in 2016, but the federal formula for calculating payouts has been criticized in the province as being outdated and poorly suited to addressing recessions related to downturns in oil and gas.

Under the current rules, a province can apply for financial assistance if its non-resource revenues decline by more than five per cent from one year to the next.

Payments are also capped based on a province's population, with a maximum of $60 per person, and assistance is not automatic; it must be approved on a case-by-case basis by the federal government.

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The polling , drawn from an online survey of more than 4,000 Canadians across the country who are members of the Angus Reid Forum, a group of Just more than one-third of all Canadians believe Alberta gives more than they get to Confederation, while 16 per cent believe Saskatchewan does

You will find people wanting separation in Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador, so Many years ago, there was a rally in which many people went to Quebec to get them to stay but some -The forced conscription of Quebecers to go fight in WW1 and WW2. -John Diefenbaker's betreyal of

Survey finds most Albertans oppose separation

As an upstart western separatist party organizes candidates to run in the next federal election, the Abacus survey found three-quarters of Albertans feel their province is treated "unfairly" in its relationship with the rest of the country.

At the same time, however, three-quarters said they would vote to remain a part of Canada in a hypothetical referendum on separation.

Kenney said Albertans continue to be frustrated with numerous federal polices but he's also been encouraged by recent conversations with members of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's newly appointed cabinet.

He said he spoke Thursday with Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland and Jim Carr, the Winnipeg South Centre MP who has been designated as the federal government's special representative to the Prairies.

"And I hope to be meeting with the prime minister in early December," Kenney said, "to convey to him personally what I've said in writing to him, which is that if he's really committed to healing the wounds and addressing the divisions, we need more than words. We need actions."

Abacus says the survey was conducted online with 3,000 adults from Nov. 12 to 17 and results were weighted according to census data "to ensure that the sample matched Canada's population according to age, gender, educational attainment, and region."

For comparison purposes, a probability-based sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of plus or minus 1.8 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. The margins of error would be higher on provincial results or other subsets of the main sample.

ANALYSIS | Anger, anxiety and the 'deep story' behind Wexit .
Wexit rhetoric is not the product of a vacuum. It stems from the belief that wealthy and oil-rich Alberta is being left behind by the rest of the country and the rest of the world. It's a sense of loss that can produce anger and anxiety far more powerful than a yearning in those who've never tasted riches. And it stems from a Canadian version of what famed sociologist Arlie Hochschild calls the deep story. The deep story from the deep southHochschild noticed something was wrong in the United States and she wanted to figure out what it was.

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