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Canada Student's dino skull discovery defies scientists' assumptions: U of A

01:25  26 november  2019
01:25  26 november  2019 Source:   edmontonjournal.com

'Welcome home:' More than 2,000-year-old bison skull returned to Blackfoot

  'Welcome home:' More than 2,000-year-old bison skull returned to Blackfoot SIKSIKA, Alta. — A more than 2,000-year-old bison skull unearthed during utility work in downtown Banff, Alta., has been returned to a southern Alberta Indigenous community. "It's like a welcome home to the buffalo skull," Siksika Nation councillor Eldon Weasel Child said Friday. The skull was given a traditional blessing at the Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park east of Calgary, which was the site of the signing of Treaty 7 in 1877. Members of the Siksika Nation then sang Blackfoot honour songs accompanied by drums and rattles."Any prayer we are involved with is first and foremost to give thanks for life and the gifts that we receive," said Weasel Child.

Paving the way for great discoveries and inventions is one of the biggest achievements for a scientist . However, unaware of the deadly consequences of radiation exposure, she died of an extremely widespread and violent cancer, and is remembered as one of the “martyrs of radiology.”

Scientists at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, used advanced CT scanning technology to image and digitally reconstruct -- bone by bone -- a detailed 3D model of the skull of Massospondylus, a sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic.

a person holding a dog: Scott Persons poses with Hannah, the skull of a Styracosaurus dinosaur that has asymmetrical horns, and Hannah, his dog which he named the skull after. Persons discovered the skull while he was a University of Alberta graduate student.© Supplied Scott Persons poses with Hannah, the skull of a Styracosaurus dinosaur that has asymmetrical horns, and Hannah, his dog which he named the skull after. Persons discovered the skull while he was a University of Alberta graduate student.

A dino skull discovered by a University of Alberta graduate student in 2015 is upending assumptions about the facial structure of dinosaurs.

Scott Persons, now a professor and museum curator at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, found the well-preserved Styracosaurus skull in the badlands northwest of Alberta’s Dinosaur Provincial Park. The spiky dinosaur, whose name means “spiked lizard,” was over five metres and had a fan of long horns.

'It felt really powerful:' 2,400-year-old bison skull welcomed by Siksika Nation

  'It felt really powerful:' 2,400-year-old bison skull welcomed by Siksika Nation A more than 2,000 year-old bison skull was welcomed by the Siksika Nation in a blessing ceremony this week, and will stay there as part of a full exhibit dedicated to their heritage.The skull of a bison which once roamed the Canadian prairies more than 2,000 years ago was welcomed by the Siksika Nation, in southern Alberta, during a traditional ceremony on Friday.

The Young Scientist Challenge is a youth science and engineering competition administered by Discovery Education and 3M for middle school students in the United States

Ancient skull discovery – Researchers have discovered the fossilized skull of an early human relative, which they say is the most complete skull ever of the early Homo genus, in Dmanisi, Georgia. That defies the current understanding of how early human relatives should be classified.

But the skull found by Persons has a trait that challenges a long-held assumption by paleontologists — its horns are asymmetrical.

Persons affectionately named his dinosaur discovery ‘Hannah,’ after his dog, though the sex of the prehistoric creature can’t be determined by its skull. He explains that in the past, dino scientists operated under the assumption that both sides of a skull had the same structure.

“When parts of one side of the skull were missing, paleontologists have assumed that the missing side was symmetrical to the one that was preserved,” Persons said in a news release. “Turns out, it isn’t necessarily. Today, deer often have left and right antlers that are different in terms of their branching patterns. Hannah shows dramatically that dinosaurs could be the same way.”

Archaeologists found ancient babies wearing skulls like helmets

  Archaeologists found ancient babies wearing skulls like helmets Archaeologists in Ecuador have uncovered the remains of babies buried over 2,000 years ago. It would be an interesting find no matter the context, but these infants are leaving researchers scratching their heads for a very specific reason: The children were buried in “helmets” made from the skulls of other, older children. The discovery is the subject of a new paper published in Latin American Antiquity. The team studying the site, led by Dr. Sara Juengst, was left struggling to explain the symbolism behind the apparently rare custom, as it’s the first time archaeologists have found anything like it.

In Ranking, U . S . Students Trail Global Leaders. The U . S . is facing a national STEM crisis, fueled by a combination of an under-resourced STEM education system, a declining interest in STEM subjects among students , and a rapidly increasing global demand for a workforce highly skilled in STEM fields.

These 5 assumptions of science seem pretty solid. But are they? Such a discovery wold send cosmology into a state of chaos for a while. A violation of any of the assumptions of science might mean that some of the major scientific theories are incorrect.

The breakthrough will mean that some partial skulls that have been discovered will have to be reevaluated as potential matches for one another. Much like moose antlers, scientists expect that there could be dramatic differences between the horn structures of different dinosaurs of the same genus, even within an individual dinosaur.

In fact, if paleontologists had discovered Hannah’s skull as two isolated halves instead of as a whole, they could have concluded those two halves came from different creatures.

Hannah’s interesting facial structure can now examined by scientists across the world after U of A researchers performed a 3-D laser scan of the skull, which paleontologists can download for detailed study.

jherring@postmedia.com

twitter.com/jasonfherring

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