Canada: New ‘line-tapping’ technology being used to scam unsuspecting victims, York police warn - - PressFrom - Canada
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Canada New ‘line-tapping’ technology being used to scam unsuspecting victims, York police warn

20:20  28 november  2019
20:20  28 november  2019 Source:   globalnews.ca

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a car parked in a parking lot: A York Regional Police cruiser at the service's Richmond Hill station.© Nick Westoll / File / Global News A York Regional Police cruiser at the service's Richmond Hill station.

York police are warning the public of a new "line-tapping" technology being used by fraudsters to scam victims out of money and personal information.

Police said on Nov 6., a woman reported to officers that she received a call from someone informing her she's been a victim of identity theft. The caller told the woman to call York Regional Police to confirm this was the case.

READ MORE: Mississauga suspects arrested after elderly targeted in ’emergency scam’: Peel police

Investigators said the woman did this and believed she had spoken to police. However, after an investigation into the incident, police determined the caller utilized a line-trapping technology to remain connected to the woman's phone line.

High school students targeted in bank card scam

  High school students targeted in bank card scam Ottawa police have issued a warning about a scam targeting high school students who are being offered easy money in exchange for their banking information. According to police, the fraudsters approach young people through an acquaintance or on social media, then offer a financial reward to convince them to give up their bank cards and PINs.  The suspects will then make a deposit as "payment" — sometimes the proceeds from an earlier fraud — and immediately make a withdrawal. Banks will normally determine the deposit is fraudulent, leaving the card holder on the hook for the money that was withdrawn.

Police said when the woman thought she was making the call to police, she was just reconnected back to the suspect. The woman lost money and the suspects were also able to steal her personal information.

Police are warning the public to be cautious whenever they receive calls or emails asking for personal information.

READ MORE: Man charged after Toronto seniors allegedly targeted in fraudulent home repair scheme

"If a situation feels suspicious, trust your instincts," a release said Thursday. "Do not be talked into providing personal information or payments if you feel uncomfortable or unsure."

All businesses and organizations should understand if someone doesn't want to offer up personal information, the release continued.

"If you wish to confirm a call you receive do so on a delayed time line. Evidence suggets that the line-tapping technology being utilized has a time limit of several minutes."

West Van police spokesman goes public after cyber thieves try to drain his bank account .
Const. Kevin Goodmurphy was able to thwart an attempt to steal thousands of dollars after his personal cell phone number was ported to a device controlled by criminals.What's he's not accustomed to is naming himself as victim in a news release, which is exactly what happened after cyber thieves tried to drain his bank account after gaining control of his personal cellphone through a scam known as "porting" or "SIM swapping.

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