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Canada Butt out, says Quebec premier, after Manitoba runs ad campaign attacking secularism bill

18:11  29 november  2019
18:11  29 november  2019 Source:   nationalpost.com

Challenge to Quebec's secularism law, Bill 21, begins in Appeal Court

  Challenge to Quebec's secularism law, Bill 21, begins in Appeal Court Challenge to Quebec's secularism law, Bill 21, begins in Appeal CourtRepresentatives of a national Muslim organization and a civil liberties group and a university student who wears an Islamic head scarf are seeking to reverse a lower court decision that allowed Bill 21 to be applied across Quebec.

QUEBEC — Manitoba would be better off spending its money improving services for its Legault said the rest of Canada’s premiers know very well his position on Quebec ’s Bill 21 on state secularism and that He has not ruled out running more advertising if the campaign proves successful.

Quebec Premier François Legault is firing back at his Manitoba counterpart over ads inviting public service workers to move west because of Bill 21, Quebec 's secularism law. The Manitoba government purchased the print and digital ads , targeting people affected by the legislation.

a close up of a newspaper: One of the campaign ads taken out by the Manitoba government. © DAVE SIDAWAY/MONTREAL GAZETTE One of the campaign ads taken out by the Manitoba government.

Manitoba’s premier would be better off spending money on French-language services or retaining NHL players than trying to woo Quebec civil servants to the Prairies, Quebec Premier Francois Legault said Thursday as he shot back at his counterpart’s latest criticism of his province’s secularism law.

Brian Pallister ’s government recently announced it is rolling out a series of newspaper and electronic advertisements in Quebec that welcome government workers to move to Manitoba if they feel threatened by their province’s ban on religious symbols in the workplace.

Legault to Pallister: Focus on French services and keeping hockey players, not luring away Quebecers

  Legault to Pallister: Focus on French services and keeping hockey players, not luring away Quebecers Quebec Premier François Legault is firing back at his counterpart in Manitoba over ads inviting public service workers to move west because of Bill 21, Quebec's secularism law.The Manitoba government purchased the print and digital ads, targeting people affected by the legislation.

She said the Manitoba government's ad campaign attempting to lure Quebecers is more than gamesmanship. Relocating is something she will seriously consider The ad campaign launched Thursday is aimed at Quebecers who feel limited by the province's secularism law, which prohibits

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister speaks to reporters after meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, on Nov. He criticized the legislation again this week, saying Manitoba is looking for more bilingual civil servants and has no intention of policing what they wear.

The ads reference “21 reasons to feel at home in Manitoba” — a reference to Quebec ’s Bill 21, which was passed into law earlier this year. The legislation prevents state employees in positions of authority, such as teachers, judges and police officers, from wearing religious symbols such as hijabs or turbans on the job.

On Thursday, Legault retorted that Pallister would be better off investing the money elsewhere.

“I think this money would have been better spent for French services in Manitoba,” Legault said in Quebec City before taking a shot at the Winnipeg Jets’ lineup.

“I think Mr. Pallister must work to keep his own people in Manitoba — like Dustin Byfuglien with the Jets,” he said, referring to the complicated relationship between the NHL team and its veteran defenceman, who was suspended without pay by the Jets after he failed to report to training camp in September.

Quebec politicians tell Manitoba to butt out of Quebec's secularism policies

  Quebec politicians tell Manitoba to butt out of Quebec's secularism policies QUEBEC — Manitoba would be better off spending its money improving services for its francophone minority instead of buying ads in Quebec newspapers to try to woo away workers frustrated with Bill 21, Premier François Legault said Thursday.  But the Parti Québécois has also plunged into the interprovincial squabbling, with interim party leader Pascal Bérubé sending a letter to the editor of the Calgary Herald responding to Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s attacks on the equalization payment system.

Quebec Premier Francois Legault is not taking kindly to Manitoba 's efforts to woo Quebecers who may be affected by the law, which bans some public-sector employees, including teachers and police officers, from wearing religious symbols such as hijabs for Muslim women and yarmulkes for Jewish

The Quebec government has tabled its long-awaited secularism bill , laying down proposed ground rules it says will ensure the religious neutrality The preamble to the bill explains the Coalition Avenir Québec government's motivation. The Quebec nation, it says , "has its own characteristics, one of

It’s not the first time the two premiers have publicly disagreed over Quebec ’s religious symbols law.

In July, Pallister said he would send letters to professional organizations, colleges and other entities in Quebec to invite public-sector workers to move west.

He criticized the legislation again this week, saying Manitoba is looking for more bilingual civil servants and has no intention of policing what they wear.

“Here in Manitoba, we have respect for diversity,” Pallister said in an interview Wednesday with The Canadian Press.

“We respect personal freedoms and rights, and we’re not big on clothing police here.”

Pallister and his Progressive Conservative government also introduced a resolution in the Manitoba legislature that promoted the rights of public servants and other people to exercise religious freedom.

Amid political gamesmanship, some Quebec Muslim women enticed by offer to move to Manitoba

  Amid political gamesmanship, some Quebec Muslim women enticed by offer to move to Manitoba Amid political gamesmanship, some Quebec Muslim women enticed by offer to move to ManitobaSeeba Chaachouh, a third-year law student at Montreal's McGill University, says she felt her options shrink after the legislation was passed into law earlier this year. She said the Manitoba government's ad campaign attempting to lure Quebecers is more than gamesmanship.

The Quebec premier , François Legault, has said the bill , which also applies to Catholic crosses, Jewish skullcaps and Sikh turbans, was necessary to preserve Quebec ’s secular values and identity. It is expected to pass in the Quebec legislature, where his right-leaning party has a majority.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister speaks to reporters after meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, not shown, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Friday, Nov. Quebec Premier Francois Legault has defended the legislation as a legitimate way to ensure secularism in the public sector.

While the resolution did not specifically mention Quebec , it expressed opposition to “any law that seeks to unjustifiably limit the religious freedoms of citizens, including passing a law that unjustifiably denies an individual’s right to wear religious clothing or symbols of one’s choice.”

On Thursday, Legault repeated his assertion that Quebec ’s secularism law is moderate, arguing that some European countries have imposed even stricter bans. He asked whether Pallister planned to take out ads in those countries, too.

“Will he do the same thing in Germany, in France, in Switzerland, in Belgium, where they have the same kind of law?” he said. “I have a tough time following Mr. Pallister .”

When asked if he was worried that the ad campaign would be successful, Legault answered simply: “No.”

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