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Canada Construction advances on Canada's government-owned oil pipeline ahead of court hearing

00:10  04 december  2019
00:10  04 december  2019 Source:   reuters.com

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FILE PHOTO: Canada ' s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks about a watchdog's report that he Months later, a court blocked the project because it said the government had failed to adequately Before buying the pipeline , Trudeau won plaudits in 2016 for committing Canada to the Paris Climate

OTTAWA — A Canadian court on Thursday froze plans to expand an oil pipeline that the government is about to purchase, ruling that the government ’ s National Energy Board While the practical effect of the decision may be a comparatively short construction delay, the ruling added fuel

Dec 3 (Reuters) - Expansion of Canada's Trans Mountain oil pipeline accelerated on Tuesday just two weeks before a court hearing in British Columbia that will decide whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government can complete the project.

The proposal to nearly triple Trans Mountain's flow of crude to 890,000 barrels per day is one of three by the industry to expand pipelines extending from Alberta, where existing pipelines are congested, to U.S. refineries. TMX, as the project is known, moves crude to the British Columbia coast, where some shipments may reach Asian markets.

Canada is the world's fourth-largest crude producer, but struggles to get new export pipelines built over opposition from environmental activists have forced the Alberta government to curtail production and prompted an exodus of foreign investors.

Rail strike, pipeline spill lead Alberta to extend oil curtailment levels

  Rail strike, pipeline spill lead Alberta to extend oil curtailment levels CALGARY — The Alberta government says it will leave its oil production quotas unchanged in January to deal with the lingering consequences after oil shipping was delayed by the Canadian National Railway Co. strike and the temporary shutdown of the Keystone pipeline following a leak in North Dakota. A spokesman for Energy Minister Sonya Savage says producers were informed Tuesday that the production limit for January will remain at 3.81 million barrels per day, the same as December, after several consecutive months of easing quotas.

WATCH: Federal court quashes construction approvals for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion “Clearly, the ruling indicated that the Trudeau government could not even follow its own process, that it failed to The Federal Court case was the most significant legal challenge facing the project and the

Canada ' s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has helped lead the international charge against climate warming, but his government has firmly supported the pipeline , seeing it as a means of boosting business. Ahead of Trump's announcement, Canadian Resources Minister James Carr said the

Federal and Alberta politicians on Tuesday marked the start of a new phase of construction near Edmonton, Alberta, involving work along the pipeline's right-of-way.

"Encouraged to finally see pipe going in the ground," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney tweeted. "There’s a long way to go, but this is good news and an important step forward."

After a legal delay, work resumed in late summer near Edmonton and in Burnaby, British Columbia, where the pipeline ends, in hopes of putting the project in service by mid-2022.

"What we’re witnessing is a lot of self-serving posturing," said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, who opposes the project. "There still is substantial opposition to the TMX project."

The Federal Court of Appeal is scheduled to hold a three-day hearing in Vancouver, British Columbia, starting on Dec. 16. The hearing will consider challenges by six indigenous groups that the Canadian government did not sufficiently consult them on the project. (Reporting by Rod Nickel in Winnipeg, Manitoba; Editing by Peter Cooney)

Next few weeks a test for Alberta-Ottawa relations, Jason Kenney says .
OTTAWA — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney left a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Tuesday with no firm commitments on the five demands he put on the table but with an air of accomplishment nonetheless, saying he felt their long-awaited face-to-face meeting was frank and realistic. Kenney said the next few weeks will be a critical time for Trudeau to prove the Liberals are serious about addressing critical issues for the province. NextKenney said the next few weeks will be a critical time for Trudeau to prove the Liberals are serious about addressing critical issues for the province.

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